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Lesson Plans


art and science

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Sandra L. Eckert (seart)
Thu, 10 Oct 1996 18:45:01 -0400


Henry,
Next week I'm going to co-present a workshop at the PAEA State conference on
the interdisciplinary links between art and science. As you can imagine, I
have been following these discussions with a great deal of interest. I
would like to use a portion of your last epic (heehee)...you were discussing
the similarities and differences (convergent vs. divergent, concrete vs.
abstract...order vs. chaos). Is that all right with you? Of course I'll
give credit where due...
I have been thinking a lot about the similarities and differences
between art and science, and they are becoming increasingly clear to me as I
do interdisciplinary work. While there are ample opportunities for combined
experiences, there is that point at which art needs to leave the concrete
mode and break free into expression, or originality...I think that the
scientific equivalent would be in the theoretical areas...a strong basis in
fact, similar to art's skills and knowledge levels, and then theoretical
"creativity". I think that most fields of knowledge are this way; you do
the groundwork, and then you move on, at whatever level you are able to
comprehend; thus the various stages and qualities of artwork, the various
levels of math, the level of a written work...and the subjects all share a
similarity at one point, which is our BASIC SENSUAL PERCEPTION; we know the
world through our senses. We organize our world through our senses first,
and logic is born of that organization, which begets mathematics and
philosophy...you get the picture. And each field moves from it's integrated
roots to it's theoretical purity , or discreet subject area, like a
distillation...it gets stronger and more divorced from the other subjects
along the way...UNTIL you encounter something like Chaos Theory which throws
it all together again, at a higher level, and makes you question everything
you have organized so nicely...thank heaven for Chaos Theory!

I love the human mind. We haven't moved so far from our primitive beliefs
that if you can name a thing, or collect its image somehow, you own it. It
all boils down to semantics in the end, and we're all going to believe what
we want or need to believe...and keep making art!

Sandy