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Lesson Plans


Re: intergration

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Lynn Foltz (lfoltz)
Wed, 9 Oct 1996 09:35:20 -0400 (EDT)


Hi Bunki

Boy have I been misunderstood - and I take the blame if I was not clear
----when I stated that teachers think they are teaching art when they use
patterns - what I meant was that some are teachers use pre-cut, stenciled
type patterns that allow students to trace - that is not created art -
students need to be encouraged to use their own wonderful creativity and
make up their own designs - if they create their OWN pattern (or stencil)
that is one thing, but to use a pre=made pattern, or to COPY what an art
teacher gives a student, is really telling the student that they cannot
think for themselves - this is what I think is a big mistake

As for pumpkins and HOLIDAY (sorry I said seasonal) art - so very many
times, teachers use sterotypical images and allow students to just repeat
what has already been done - I believe, in my humble opinion, that -
because the curriculum in my school system is so full - we don't really
have time to assign trite art experiences - there are just too many
wonderful opportunities for students to really think for themselves and
create on their own to use overdone, repeated and stale,trite images to
waste the valuable time in the classroom. For example, for second
graders, I teach color mixing and tint mixing by bringing in pumpkins
with vines and/or leaves - students observe them, draw a "pumpkin" patch
with chalk and mix colors to paint the pumpkins, leaves and vines. This
way they learn color mixing, observe the contours of the pumpkins and use
the season (not really the holiday) to have an experience to not only
learn about art and nature(science) - they are allowed to develop their
compositio as they see fit -- I hope I have made myself more clear -
please believe me when I say I have observed many people to use cut-out
construction paper to make jack-o-lanterns with sterotypical triange eyes
and nose, etc. - we all are inundated with these images - our job is to
help children think for themselves, create for themselves - we are to
help them develope aesthetics, understand something about art history,
thus the history of the world and have an experience with art production,
but they also need the tools to create the art - understanding
vocabulary, techniques, tools, etc.

I hope you can calm down - I understand your frustrations if you thought
I wanted to eliminate patterns -- I use "pattern" almost every day in
teaching - especially for elementary students - they respond so well to
them, they learn the elements of design, but also the principles of
design while creating patterns --- that's an intrigal part of my
particular program for elementary!

Look forward to your respons, Bunki
Lynn

On Tue, 8 Oct 1996, Bunki Kramer wrote:

> Hi, Lynn, You wrote, among other posts....
>
> >Well, for goodness sakes - all I want to do is uphold and keep the
> >integrity of art education at a high standard and REALLY TEACH ART rather
> >than lose the real teaching of art by teaching students that art is a
> >salt map or a pumpkin or a Christmas tree - I have been a supervisor and
> >state presenter and Board Member of our state association and attending
> >NAEA conventions for years and years and years ----- and what I have seen
> >and observed so very many times is that people think they are teaching
> >art by using patterns and season to motivate students.... this is not
> >truly a DBAE approach------------- I also believe and live in a way that
> >other subject areas become a part of teaching art WHEN IT IS A NATURAL
> >AND REAL CONNECTION - I have fought this fight for most of my teaching
> >career and I hate to see new and experienced teachers fall into the
> >danger of creating sloppy and shallow programs - all for the sake of
> >integration ---of course I integrate many, many, many times - but I truly
> >make sure that it is APPROPRIATE for the goal or measure I am teaching
> >for art. I hope I am making myself clear......Sorry to step on so many
> >toes!!
> >Most humbly and respectfully,
> >Lynn
> ------------------end of message------------------
>
> You're comments have made me very angry and I haven't written until now so
> that I could cool down before I responded.
>
> You have mentioned that you are an experienced teacher, a supervisor, a
> presenter, a state board member and attendee of several conventions.
> Unfortunately that does not necessarily make a "good" teacher or one whose
> opinion should be validated. Although I understand your opinions, I cannot
> agree with them. Any art experience is better than no experience...be it
> pumpkins or trees, etc. Those schools which have no formal art teacher must
> rely on who is available to teach them and if people like you undermine the
> self-confidence of those who try, you will have taken away something from
> these very students.
>
> How could you EVER say..."people think they are teaching art by using
> patterns and seasons to motivate students. This is truly not a DBAE
> approach." Perhaps you need to update your information about DBAE
> approaches. Pattern is one of the 7 elements of design. What do you think
> kaleidoscope design is other than a study in pattern? It most DEFINITELY
> has a place in the artroom!
> Are you telling me that Victor Vaserely (father of Pop Art) and M.C. Escher
> are not considered artists as well as scientists and mathematicians? Art
> intergrates with everything EVERYWHERE and ANYWHERE at ANYTIME. There is
> absolutely nothing wrong with intergrating art with math, science, social
> studies, etc. in the artroom at ANYTIME!!! I'll strongly defend that with
> anyone!!! I truly believe art should not be taught with a "tight-lipped"
> approach. It's meant to be beautiful, wonderful, enlightening, engrossing,
> spiritual, meaningful, jubilent, worldly, personal, colorful, entertaining,
> intergrating and hugged with your very being. It's not meant to be taught
> with just one approach!!
>
> Sorry to be so vocal. Guess I need to cool off some more. I just did not
> care for your flippent reply to someone who was asking a genuine question
> on resources for kaleiscopes. I think we need to "care" for one another in
> this world....and who better to ask than art teachers!!!
>
>
>
>
>
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>
>
> Bunki Kramer
> Los Cerros Middle School
> 968 Blemer Road
> Danville, California 94526
> sch.# 510-552-5620
> bkramer.ca.us
>
>
>