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Lesson Plans


Re: National Convention

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Ditte Wolff (dwolff.us)
Tue, 1 Oct 1996 22:23:13 -0600


Here's a few more things they didn't tell you about teaching.
1. Your sub will ignore the lesson plan you spent writing up for them and
hauled yourself to school to deliver at 7:30 in the morning when you were
sick.
2. While you were out "someone" borrowed your scissors and didn't leave a note.
3. You were "volunteered" for chair of a committee no one wanted.
4. You came to school with two shoes of the same style, but different colors.
5. The water was turned off the first day of a painting project.
6. The first parent to show up at open house, turns out to be former
student.(that's for us old folks)
7. You give an inspiring welcome talk and explanation at open house, only
to discover that half of the parents do not understand English.
8. Some one puts clay in the key holes of all the doors to the art rooms.
9. You discover that the student pictures of the hand drawings you put up
in the office, have gang tattoos and the wrong finger projecting, but they
were drawn beautifully.
10. You have recorded your grades using the wrong pencil and the secretary
wants you to redo them.
11. A parent gets your home number and calls you with personal problems
every week at 10 pm.
12. You have been asked to do all the signs for the cafeteria by tomorrow.
13. Another teacher uses your room diuring your prep and the still life you
spent an hour setting up has been moved, so she can show slides.
14. You will have two misspelled words on the chalkboard or a chart when an
administrator walks in to observe.
15. You will forget to go to a faculty meeting and do something dumb the
next day as a result.

If you want a laugh, at least later in teaching. Write down a few of the
dumb goofs you make the first year, . Put down your biggest worries and
goals. Place them in an envelope and seal it Open it a year later.

Incidentally, if you identify the kids who looks to be the biggest problem
in your class the first day of the term and the brightest kid in class, put
that note in the envelope also. It is intersting to see if they remain so
at the end of the year. Often if the problem kid leaves, you quickly pick
another one to take his place. What does that tell us about our thinking?

I need the humor, keep it coming. Ditte