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[teacherartexchange] Thomas J. Watson Library of The Metropolitan Museum of Art announces Knoedler & Company Exhibition Catalogs collaborative project

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From: Bowling, Melissa (Melissa.Bowling_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Mon Oct 31 2011 - 08:40:41 PDT


The Knoedler & Company Exhibition Catalogs collaborative project

This announcement marks the completion of collaborative project coordinated by the Thomas J. Watson Library at The Metropolitan Museum of Art to preserve and digitize the early exhibition catalogs of Knoedler & Company, a renowned art gallery in New York.

Knoedler & Company

Knoedler & Company was established in 1857 and has been among the most important art dealers in New York City for a century and a half. Following the pattern of Watson Library's successful collaboration with the Frick Art Reference Library on the Macbeth Gallery project, we worked with Knoedler & Company and the Arcade libraries (Frick Art Reference Library, Brooklyn Museum Libraries and Archives, and the Museum of Modern Art Library) to identify Knoedler exhibition catalogs, pamphlets, and checklists in our collections to create a series that is as complete as possible.

In total, we digitized 898 catalogs, checklists, and unpublished materials from the Watson, Arcade, and Knoedler collections, comprising approximately 14,000 pages of content created between 1869 and 1946. Many items include extensive handwritten annotations; in several cases, more than one copy of a particular catalog was digitized to capture these unique additions.

Access to these items is available through the libraries' respective online catalogs, Watsonline and Arcade, as well as the OCLC library cooperative catalog, WorldCat. The catalogs' contents are full-text searchable in Watson Library's digital content management system, CONTENTdm.

Watson Library CONTENTdm: http://libmma.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/landingpage/collection/p15324coll8

Watsonline: http://library.metmuseum.org/search~S1/t?SEARCH=contentdm+knoedler
Arcade: http://arcade.nyarc.org/search~S16/X?(knoedler%20digital%20project)&searchscope=16&SORT=DX

This project was made possible by the Lifchez Stronach Fund for Preservation at the Thomas J. Watson Library and funds from the Frick Art Reference Library.

Best regards,
Dan Lipcan

Assistant Museum Librarian for Systems and Special Projects
Thomas J. Watson Library
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10028
212.650.2982
http://library.metmuseum.org/

About the Watson Library Digitization Initiative

The primary mission of the Watson Library Digitization Initiative is to expand access to the Library's rare and unique materials by developing, supporting, and promoting a distinctive digital collection of these items. The initiative targets materials that fall outside parameters of other major digitization efforts such as Google Books or the Internet Archive and makes them accessible to support the scholarly research of the Museum staff and an international community of researchers. Digitization also addresses many of our physical preservation concerns for rare and fragile materials. These benefits have been extended to other Museum departments with research collections suitable for digitization.

We again employed Northern Micrographics, located in Wisconsin, to digitize the majority of the Knoedler materials. Some material was digitized by the library using our Zeutschel scanner. Watson Library continues to concentrate on the digitization of selected rare and fragile items, in addition to the physical repair and rehousing of materials. Digitization is an excellent preservation tool, protecting the original item from damage through repeated use, and it allows the greatest possible access to its contents.

-----Original Message-----
From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest [mailto:teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu]
Sent: Thursday, October 06, 2011 3:01 AM
To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: October 05, 2011

TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Wednesday, October 05, 2011.

1. RE: Music in the artroom K-5
2. RE: Music in the artroom K-5
3. music in the artroom
4. Re: music in the artroom

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Subject: RE: Music in the artroom K-5
From: "Strandberg, Debra" <dstrandberg@mwisd.net>
Date: Wed, 5 Oct 2011 08:11:08 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

I use pianist Jim Brickman for 4th, 5th and 6th grade art...more to the classical side, but his has many collections...

________________________________________
From: Fran Legman [fran.legman@gmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, October 04, 2011 10:14 PM
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
Subject: [teacherartexchange] Music in the artroom K-5

Any suggestions for music for K-5?
Jazz, classical and popular (esp for 5th grade)?

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Subject: RE: Music in the artroom K-5
From: "Amy Broady" <ABroady@comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 5 Oct 2011 09:57:34 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2
Greg Percy is great to have on hand...fun tunes that teach kids about art concepts and artists. Fairly lively in a variety of styles. I love the "Picasso Polka," "Pop Andy" (about Andy Warhol), and "Where's the Tiger?"
(about Rouseau).
If you are not familiar with him, he has 5 DVDs called Songs in the Key of Art (Volumes 1-5). You can also get the lyrics.
Here's a link to his website:
http://www.songsinthekeyofart.com/
For peaceful background music, I play the Native American flute music of Rick Roberts, who is one of the co-creators of Zentangle.
(www.zentangle.com). Rick not only recorded the music, but he himself made the flute on which he performs!
Instrumental Celtic tunes are another favorite.
I also love the ukulele music of Jake Shimabukuru. I only have one CD of his; I don't know if he has other albums, but the one I play often is "(peace sign) (heart) ukulele"
The Relaxation Company has lots of got soft, relaxing soundtracks. I bought a bunch of them when Borders was closing...40% off music is hard for me to resist. (Moment of silence here in fond memory of Borders. I feel the void.)
Speaking of good deals, I found some good classical soundtracks at Tuesday Morning for good prices.
Sorry to ramble on...I love having music in the background of my art room!
Amy in TN
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Subject: music in the artroom
From: ruth campbell <campbellruthscott@yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 5 Oct 2011 17:51:41 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 3
re: music in the artroom ( K-12)
 
Here's a tip==
If you google  ITunes, open it  and select Radio from the Menu, it opens to all genres== I often select Classical, which then opens to tons of radio station sub list choices;   "calm radio" offerings are my frequent choice esp.
" piano and guitar solos"  great-- no commercials, no lyrics= I always choose specifically instrumental stations.
 
In the  initial list of genres you can find ambient, new age, jazz, techno, and many, many more.
I keep the icon on my desktop, and open it first thing when I get to school. Haunting and eerie ones for the spooky season.
Enjoy!
R
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Subject: Re: music in the artroom
From: Gayle Parent <gayleparent@gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 5 Oct 2011 20:35:22 -0700
X-Message-Number: 4
Wow, what a helpful email!  Thank you!
Gayle
On Oct 5, 2011, at 5:51 PM, ruth campbell wrote:
> re: music in the artroom ( K-12)
>  
> Here's a tip==
> If you google  ITunes, open it  and select Radio from the Menu, it 
> opens to all genres== I often select Classical, which then opens to tons of radio station
> sub list choices;   "calm radio" offerings are my frequent choice esp.
> " piano and guitar solos"  great-- no commercials, no lyrics= I always 
> choose specifically instrumental stations.
>  
> In the  initial list of genres you can find ambient, new age, jazz, 
> techno, and many, many more.
> I keep the icon on my desktop, and open it first thing when I get to 
> school. Haunting and eerie ones for the spooky season.
> Enjoy!
> R
> 
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> 
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END OF DIGEST
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