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Re: [teacherartexchange] The real world vs. teaching art

---------

From: Denise Mozzetti (mozzart_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Sun Oct 23 2011 - 11:05:23 PDT


And now you know why it used to be that teachers were not allowed to marry - they weren't supposed to have a life outside of teaching!!!

Denise

On Oct 23, 2011, at 9:18 AM, Jerry Vilenski wrote:

> One thing that strikes me about teaching is that despite all the mean spirited demonizing of the profession nation-wide, I have rarely observed a profession as hard working and dedicated as those in education. Educators work in a rather unique segment of society--they are very much public servants, finding themselves working in an ever increasingly hostile environment, with considerable pressure from stressed out school boards, incompetent administrations, state legislatures bent on cutting everything to do with education and parents who believe everything they hear from the politicians, who attack public education at every opportunity. As an art educator for 34 years, I found that just "doing my job" was never enough to actually keep my job. When education is under attack (which has been the case for many decades), it is imperative that those in the arts make themselves an integral part of the educational machine, because they are usually among
> the first to go. Art educators need to become active in their communities, and that means starting with getting your programs out of the school buildings and into the public, becoming a practicing artist in your own right in order to model the behaviors that Judy D. talks about, representing art education by serving on cultural boards and art councils, serving the community by sitting on city commissions, library boards or civic organizations.
>
> I rather doubt that working in the private sector has any or many of these pressures associated with being a professional. During my career I often wished it was different, but I found that rather than being the victim of all the pressures, I would become proactive in my profession. Rather than waiting around for others to advocate for my department, I became the advocate--I became active in my teacher's union, injected myself on committees dealing with scheduling, compensation, building facilities and budgets. I made sure my name was known in the community, by founding an arts council and serving as its president for 20 years, providing visual arts, music and theater events in the community for the first time ever. I designed and built sets for theater productions, served on civic boards and committees. In doing so, I was able to pay back my community as well as become the face of my profession in the town where I worked and lived. The end
> result was an increased profile of art education as well as credibility when making the case for keeping art in the curriculum. I think it was worth the effort--it is up to the rest of you to act in your own best self interest if you expect to survive.
>
> There are several veterans on this list like San D and Judy who learned those lessons during their careers--we are lucky to have them as mentors!
>
> Jerry
>
>
> ________________________________
> From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> To: teacherartexchange digest recipients <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> Sent: Sunday, October 23, 2011 3:00 AM
> Subject: teacherartexchange digest: October 22, 2011
>
> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Saturday, October 22, 2011.
>
> 1. What are "we" doing wrong - Plus homework suggestion for middle school
> 2. Re: I haven't gotten the digest since Oct. 10
> 3. Re: I haven't gotten the digest since Oct. 10
> 4. RE: I haven't gotten the digest since Oct. 10
> 5. Re: I haven't gotten the digest since Oct. 10
> 6. The "Real World" vs Teaching - Yes the show must go on!
> 7. RE: I haven't gotten the digest since Oct. 10
> 8. RE: I haven't gotten the digest since Oct. 10
> 9. Re: I haven't gotten the digest since Oct. 10
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: What are "we" doing wrong - Plus homework suggestion for middle school
> From: Judy Decker <jdecker4art@gmail.com>
> Date: Sat, 22 Oct 2011 11:37:37 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 1
>
> Greetings Art Educators,
>
> I am doing two posts in one. An Art Education list member needs
> homework suggestions for middle school (homework at the bottom of this
> post).
>
> I was just writing to a list member lamenting how "ordinary"
> everything is now at Pier 1 and even Ten Thousand Villages items are
> becoming more and more "ordinary" looking. Why doesn't extraordinary
> sell anymore? What are art teachers across our country not doing? Why
> aren't people flocking to the stores to BUY beautiful things made by
> others? Not all students will grow up to be great artists - but they
> can certainly appreciate beautiful art. I use to volunteer at a Ten
> Thousand Villages near by and was thrilled when former students of
> mine would come in to BUY art - looking for something interesting and
> unique.
>
> My home is filled with beautiful things made by people around the
> world and as many of you know, a lot from Africa. I always took my
> cultural treasures in to enhance my art lessons. No, we didn't copy
> the art of others, but used it for inspiration. Much of my own
> personal art has African influence....and now so does much of my
> jewelry. Oh the stories they could tell..... I am using beads from
> Africa Direct (also Tibetan beads and pendants from Africa Direct).
> Some day, I will get server space on Princeton Online again so I can
> share them with you.
>
> I am not a great artist - never have been - but I certainly do
> appreciate art and the beautiful things others make. Each year, my
> husband and I go to Ann Arbor Art Fair to BUY art. Last year, it was
> one of Valerie Bunnell's ceramic dolls - this year it was a Retablo
> from an artist we both admired for years- Nicario Jimenez - from Peru
> - now living in Florida.
>
> Do you share with your students the beautiful things you buy? Do you
> model art appreciation? Do you model passion for art?
>
> Now for the homework assignments..... Have students look for beautiful
> hand made items in their environment. Art IS a part of our daily
> lives. Have them find something hand made and write about it. If they
> can not find anything handmade in their home, how about a local museum
> (like an antique embroidery or hair wreath -- something displayed that
> is hand made). It may be hard to find something handmade in local
> stores (as I said, even Pier 1 is pretty ordinary now - more mass
> produced like Hobby Lobby). Art is a part of all things we use.
> Someone designed it. Have them write about something that they use and
> the way it was designed. Look at what their parents have chosen to put
> on the walls of their home - Interview their mother/father and find
> out why they selected that piece (even if mass produced print from
> Home Interiors and the like). Have them look for beauty in the
> buildings around them.... have them look for beauty in the fabrics of
> their clothing....etc etc. This was ALL part of DBAE when it started.
> Where have art teachers gone a stray? Their "homework" can literally
> be about their HOME (smile). Not all homework has to be drawing
> something. I could never have my students create sketchbooks as I
> don't even keep up my own sketchbook (I do have sketchbooks - filled
> with many blank pages and only a few drawings). Yes, I always made my
> students sketch a pot or sculpture to plan before they made it - but
> even that is something I never did. I worked from an idea in my head.
> With my jewelry now, sketching first would be of little value to me. I
> need to see it all put together - then tweak - and re-tweak if needed.
>
> Regards,
>
> Judy Decker
>
> P.S. As always, Getty members remember to remove email addresses of
> the original sender (if your mail program includes it). To do so,
> simply highlight the email addresses and delete it so it just reads
> "the member's name" wrote:
> Your efforts will reduce the amount of Spam members get -- and will
> make it harder for Spammers to "spoof" member email addresses in posts
> to the list.
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: I haven't gotten the digest since Oct. 10
> From: Leslie O'Shaughnessy <lbhdto@hotmail.com>
> Date: Sat, 22 Oct 2011 11:57:58 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 2
>
> End of first month seemed like middle of school year.
>
> I teach in a block schedule, 4 odd periods one day, 4 even the next, to include a planning period on odd, and an IPR period on even. IPR is used for weekly PLC meetings, lunch duty, test proctor training, other duties as as assigned, etc. Planning is used for IEP meetings and monthly mini conf presentations as directed by Admin. Planning time is also used to send weekly progress reports to parents, complete written IEP inquiries, prepare work for students serving ISS, reading weekly principal newsletter, in addition to creating plans and prototypes for teaching, calling parents of disruptive students, ordering supplies, maintaining 2 classrooms, keeping display classes filled, etc.
>
> I have 4 preps + NAHS, which I sponsor. I also serve on Governor's School Nominating Comm, NHS Nominating Comm, CAS Advisor of 4+ students, Mentor an At-Risk student, and serve on newly formed Literacy Comm, and Technology Comm., and am a mentor to a teacher new to the school.
>
> I also have pull-outs for speech and counseling, and SPED and ESOL students that require differentiation and additional instruction.
>
> And, I am currently supervising one indoor wall painting and one outdoor painted mural, and have taken on design/production for school literary magazine (glutton for punishment!)
>
> Leslie at HS in VA
>
> On Oct 21, 2011, at 9:06 AM, "Strandberg, Debra" <dstrandberg@mwisd.net> wrote:
>
>> I know what you mean about a busy year...I'm curious about your time frames on classes.
>> I have four back to back 6th and 4th grade classes. 30 minutes each, no set up time in between. I have to chunk up the lessons very carefully.
>> Good thing though is that I have them every day.
>>
>> Lots of pull-outs though for speech, counseling, etc. I'm also holding an hour tutorial in the afternoon for ESL students plus watching three recess classes a day (first time for that!) Last hour of the day are 2 5th grade art classes. Makes for a busy day!
>>
>> What are your days like?
>>
>> ________________________________________
>> From: Barbara Marder
>> Sent: Friday, October 21, 2011 5:08 AM
>> To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
>> Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] I haven't gotten the digest since Oct. 10
>>
>> Hi All,
>>
>> This is a killer year!
>> More crowded classes, more duties, more expectations-less time and in some cases NO time between classes. My classroom is a revolving door, and I have only one set of hands-so it's multi-tasking the entire school day.
>>
>> Barbara
>>
>> On Oct 21, 2011, at 4:11 AM, :
>>
>>> I don't know about you, but this year seems the absolute busiest I can ever remember and I have been teaching for a long time. I feel like I am well into the 6th month of teaching this school year and it is only the second!
>>> Hope all of you are having a greta year so far. -Katrina in Los Angeles
>>>
>>> ____________________________________________________________
>>> Penny Stock Jumping 3000%
>>> Sign up to the #1 voted penny stock newsletter for free today!
>>> http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/4ea1293471766c941edst05vuc
>>>
>>> ---
>>> To unsubscribe go to
>>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>>
>>
>>
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go to
>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go to
>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: I haven't gotten the digest since Oct. 10
> From: Barbara Marder <marder621@rcn.com>
> Date: Sat, 22 Oct 2011 12:11:27 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 3
>
> Hi All,
>
> Okay here goes:
> six classes daily K-8 so nine lesson plans
> but
> on Wednesday kids come in different configuration (too complicated to explain)-so I need 6 additional lesson plans just for Wednesday
> Also one 8th grade art elective class on wednesday-am doing some metalsmithing-cold connections
>
> Lunch duty daily
>
> Wednesday after-school prof. dev. meetings 1 1/2 to 2 hours twice monthly
>
> Multi-page lesson plans including objectives, essential questions, differentiations, habits of mind, aspirations, local and nat'l frameworks, visuals etc etc-to validate what we do for those who have no clue about visual arts education
>
> Expected to connect art to literacy
>
> All SPEDS mainstreamed including multi-handicapped and emotionally disturbed who are in inclusion programs for academics
>
> Am exhausted and take an outside class weekly so I will continue my own art-making
>
> Of course displays and art festivals need to be done-usually I do this after school since I force myself to take contractual lunch break every day-it gives me a chance to sit for a small while, interact with staff, and get some nutrition.
>
> It's challenging to teach elem. and middle school. My space is well-equipped but SMALL so I have kids packed in for some sections.
>
> Guess this is the wave of the future for those of us who survived cuts.
>
> Barbara from Boston
>
>
>
>
> On Oct 22, 2011, at 11:57 AM, Leslie O'Shaughnessy wrote:
>
>> End of first month seemed like middle of school year.
>>
>> I teach in a block schedule, 4 odd periods one day, 4 even the next, to include a planning period on odd, and an IPR period on even. IPR is used for weekly PLC meetings, lunch duty, test proctor training, other duties as as assigned, etc. Planning is used for IEP meetings and monthly mini conf presentations as directed by Admin. Planning time is also used to send weekly progress reports to parents, complete written IEP inquiries, prepare work for students serving ISS, reading weekly principal newsletter, in addition to creating plans and prototypes for teaching, calling parents of disruptive students, ordering supplies, maintaining 2 classrooms, keeping display classes filled, etc.
>>
>> I have 4 preps + NAHS, which I sponsor. I also serve on Governor's School Nominating Comm, NHS Nominating Comm, CAS Advisor of 4+ students, Mentor an At-Risk student, and serve on newly formed Literacy Comm, and Technology Comm., and am a mentor to a teacher new to the school.
>>
>> I also have pull-outs for speech and counseling, and SPED and ESOL students that require differentiation and additional instruction.
>>
>> And, I am currently supervising one indoor wall painting and one outdoor painted mural, and have taken on design/production for school literary magazine (glutton for punishment!)
>>
>> Leslie at HS in VA
>>
>> On Oct 21, 2011, at 9:06 AM, "Strandberg, Debra" <dstrandberg@mwisd.net> wrote:
>>
>>> I know what you mean about a busy year...I'm curious about your time frames on classes.
>>> I have four back to back 6th and 4th grade classes. 30 minutes each, no set up time in between. I have to chunk up the lessons very carefully.
>>> Good thing though is that I have them every day.
>>>
>>> Lots of pull-outs though for speech, counseling, etc. I'm also holding an hour tutorial in the afternoon for ESL students plus watching three recess classes a day (first time for that!) Last hour of the day are 2 5th grade art classes. Makes for a busy day!
>>>
>>> What are your days like?
>>>
>>> ________________________________________
>>> From: Barbara Marder
>>> Sent: Friday, October 21, 2011 5:08 AM
>>> To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
>>> Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] I haven't gotten the digest since Oct. 10
>>>
>>> Hi All,
>>>
>>> This is a killer year!
>>> More crowded classes, more duties, more expectations-less time and in some cases NO time between classes. My classroom is a revolving door, and I have only one set of hands-so it's multi-tasking the entire school day.
>>>
>>> Barbara
>>>
>>> On Oct 21, 2011, at 4:11 AM, :
>>>
>>>> I don't know about you, but this year seems the absolute busiest I can ever remember and I have been teaching for a long time. I feel like I am well into the 6th month of teaching this school year and it is only the second!
>>>> Hope all of you are having a greta year so far. -Katrina in Los Angeles
>>>>
>>>> ____________________________________________________________
>>>> Penny Stock Jumping 3000%
>>>> Sign up to the #1 voted penny stock newsletter for free today!
>>>> http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/4ea1293471766c941edst05vuc
>>>>
>>>> ---
>>>> To unsubscribe go to
>>>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> ---
>>> To unsubscribe go to
>>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>> ---
>>> To unsubscribe go to
>>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>>
>>
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go to
>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: I haven't gotten the digest since Oct. 10
> From: San D Hasselman <shasselman@hotmail.com>
> Date: Sat, 22 Oct 2011 16:22:10 +0000
> X-Message-Number: 4
>
>
> Dear Leslie in the high school in VA
>
> I kept that pace for 35 years, and when I retired last year, I just wanted to sit down. LOL. Everytime I hear anyone malign teachers the hair goes up on the back of my neck. I turn into a witch, and not just for Halloween (although I am present playing one in our local community Haunted House).
>
> I worked "in the real world" 7 years before I could get a full time art teaching job, and let me tell you, I worked harder as an educator than I ever did as a graphic designer,printing press operator, secretary in personnel or assistant to a collections lawyer. While "real world" jobs have their unique pressures, job to job, you are never "on" for the whole time as you are as an educator. In the real world you can gossip, go to the bathroom, have lunch for 1 hour, curse if you drop something on your foot, roll your eyes at your boss, and pass the buck. In teaching every word has to be measured, your kidneys have to be strong, and you are the boss, so you can't pass the buck. There is no such thing as a bad hair day, a day where you feel horrible, or a day where you want to slow down. The "show" must go on, while you might have taught the color wheel for 30 years, it is the first time for the kids in front of you and you want them to be excited
> about it. Educators are all too aware that we can, with a look, or a word, harm a student in a way that they won't like our subject matter for the rest of their lives. Believe me when I tell you that the other jobs that I had, none of those bosses or clients remember my name, but there are thousands of my art students that remember mine now.
>
> San D
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: I haven't gotten the digest since Oct. 10
> From: Diane Davis <dianemdavis@mac.com>
> Date: Sat, 22 Oct 2011 12:22:21 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 5
>
> We have two art teachers at our school. We both teach 13 different
> classes a week, which makes for a lot of lesson planning. We have 5-6
> classes per day of nearly an hour each, Weds. meetings after school
> and committee requirements. I work from Dec.- March on the sets for
> the school play. I also teach art club one aft. a week and the other
> teacher does after school homework club five days a week. Yes, art
> teachers are busy.....
> Diane
> On Oct 22, 2011, at 12:11 PM, Barbara Marder wrote:
>
>> Hi All,
>>
>> Okay here goes:
>> six classes daily K-8 so nine lesson plans
>> but
>> on Wednesday kids come in different configuration (too complicated
>> to explain)-so I need 6 additional lesson plans just for Wednesday
>> Also one 8th grade art elective class on wednesday-am doing some
>> metalsmithing-cold connections
>>
>> Lunch duty daily
>>
>> Wednesday after-school prof. dev. meetings 1 1/2 to 2 hours twice
>> monthly
>>
>> Multi-page lesson plans including objectives, essential questions,
>> differentiations, habits of mind, aspirations, local and nat'l
>> frameworks, visuals etc etc-to validate what we do for those who
>> have no clue about visual arts education
>>
>> Expected to connect art to literacy
>>
>> All SPEDS mainstreamed including multi-handicapped and emotionally
>> disturbed who are in inclusion programs for academics
>>
>> Am exhausted and take an outside class weekly so I will continue my
>> own art-making
>>
>> Of course displays and art festivals need to be done-usually I do
>> this after school since I force myself to take contractual lunch
>> break every day-it gives me a chance to sit for a small while,
>> interact with staff, and get some nutrition.
>>
>> It's challenging to teach elem. and middle school. My space is well-
>> equipped but SMALL so I have kids packed in for some sections.
>>
>> Guess this is the wave of the future for those of us who survived
>> cuts.
>>
>> Barbara from Boston
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Oct 22, 2011, at 11:57 AM, Leslie O'Shaughnessy wrote:
>>
>>> End of first month seemed like middle of school year.
>>>
>>> I teach in a block schedule, 4 odd periods one day, 4 even the
>>> next, to include a planning period on odd, and an IPR period on
>>> even. IPR is used for weekly PLC meetings, lunch duty, test proctor
>>> training, other duties as as assigned, etc. Planning is used for
>>> IEP meetings and monthly mini conf presentations as directed by
>>> Admin. Planning time is also used to send weekly progress reports
>>> to parents, complete written IEP inquiries, prepare work for
>>> students serving ISS, reading weekly principal newsletter, in
>>> addition to creating plans and prototypes for teaching, calling
>>> parents of disruptive students, ordering supplies, maintaining 2
>>> classrooms, keeping display classes filled, etc.
>>>
>>> I have 4 preps + NAHS, which I sponsor. I also serve on Governor's
>>> School Nominating Comm, NHS Nominating Comm, CAS Advisor of 4+
>>> students, Mentor an At-Risk student, and serve on newly formed
>>> Literacy Comm, and Technology Comm., and am a mentor to a teacher
>>> new to the school.
>>>
>>> I also have pull-outs for speech and counseling, and SPED and ESOL
>>> students that require differentiation and additional instruction.
>>>
>>> And, I am currently supervising one indoor wall painting and one
>>> outdoor painted mural, and have taken on design/production for
>>> school literary magazine (glutton for punishment!)
>>>
>>> Leslie at HS in VA
>>>
>>> On Oct 21, 2011, at 9:06 AM, "Strandberg, Debra" <dstrandberg@mwisd.net
>>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> I know what you mean about a busy year...I'm curious about your
>>>> time frames on classes.
>>>> I have four back to back 6th and 4th grade classes. 30 minutes
>>>> each, no set up time in between. I have to chunk up the lessons
>>>> very carefully.
>>>> Good thing though is that I have them every day.
>>>>
>>>> Lots of pull-outs though for speech, counseling, etc. I'm also
>>>> holding an hour tutorial in the afternoon for ESL students plus
>>>> watching three recess classes a day (first time for that!) Last
>>>> hour of the day are 2 5th grade art classes. Makes for a busy day!
>>>>
>>>> What are your days like?
>>>>
>>>> ________________________________________
>>>> From: Barbara Marder
>>>> Sent: Friday, October 21, 2011 5:08 AM
>>>> To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
>>>> Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] I haven't gotten the digest
>>>> since Oct. 10
>>>>
>>>> Hi All,
>>>>
>>>> This is a killer year!
>>>> More crowded classes, more duties, more expectations-less time and
>>>> in some cases NO time between classes. My classroom is a
>>>> revolving door, and I have only one set of hands-so it's multi-
>>>> tasking the entire school day.
>>>>
>>>> Barbara
>>>>
>>>> On Oct 21, 2011, at 4:11 AM, :
>>>>
>>>>> I don't know about you, but this year seems the absolute busiest
>>>>> I can ever remember and I have been teaching for a long time. I
>>>>> feel like I am well into the 6th month of teaching this school
>>>>> year and it is only the second!
>>>>> Hope all of you are having a greta year so far. -Katrina in Los
>>>>> Angeles
>>>>>
>>>>> ____________________________________________________________
>>>>> Penny Stock Jumping 3000%
>>>>> Sign up to the #1 voted penny stock newsletter for free today!
>>>>> http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/4ea1293471766c941edst05vuc
>>>>>
>>>>> ---
>>>>> To unsubscribe go to
>>>>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> ---
>>>> To unsubscribe go to
>>>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>>> ---
>>>> To unsubscribe go to
>>>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>>>
>>>
>>> ---
>>> To unsubscribe go to
>>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>>
>>
>>
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go to
>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: The "Real World" vs Teaching - Yes the show must go on!
> From: Judy Decker <jdecker4art@gmail.com>
> Date: Sat, 22 Oct 2011 12:55:34 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 6
>
> Greetings All,
>
> There have been some GREAT posts in this thread.... Remember to change
> the subject line to something that matches your post.... San D's was
> such a good one, that I chose to re-post it for any who may have
> thought it was just another "lament" on the list being slow....
>
> Yes, it is sooooo much fun running into former students. Even though
> my hair is gray now (instead of the brown I had when teaching), they
> still remember my name. I buy freshwater fish from one of my former
> students (who is assistant manager at a local pet store). He said he
> never liked art until he had ME! How rewarding is that?! Of course, I
> get great service there, too (smile).
>
> Regards,
>
> Judy Decker
>
> On Sat, Oct 22, 2011 at 12:22 PM, San D Hasselman wrote:
>>
>> Dear Leslie in the high school in VA
>>
>> I kept that pace for 35 years, and when I retired last year, I just wanted to sit down. LOL. Everytime I hear anyone malign teachers the hair goes up on the back of my neck. I turn into a witch, and not just for Halloween (although I am present playing one in our local community Haunted House).
>>
>> I worked "in the real world" 7 years before I could get a full time art teaching job, and let me tell you, I worked harder as an educator than I ever did as a graphic designer,printing press operator, secretary in personnel or assistant to a collections lawyer. While "real world" jobs have their unique pressures, job to job, you are never "on" for the whole time as you are as an educator. In the real world you can gossip, go to the bathroom, have lunch for 1 hour, curse if you drop something on your foot, roll your eyes at your boss, and pass the buck. In teaching every word has to be measured, your kidneys have to be strong, and you are the boss, so you can't pass the buck. There is no such thing as a bad hair day, a day where you feel horrible, or a day where you want to slow down. The "show" must go on, while you might have taught the color wheel for 30 years, it is the first time for the kids in front of you and you want them to be excited
> about it. Educators are all too aware that we can, with a look, or a word, harm a student in a way that they won't like our subject matter for the rest of their lives. Believe me when I tell you that the other jobs that I had, none of those bosses or clients remember my name, but there are thousands of my art students that remember mine now.
>>
>> San D
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: I haven't gotten the digest since Oct. 10
> From: "Michal Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
> Date: Sat, 22 Oct 2011 12:07:55 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 7
>
> Reading about all of your days makes me 1) feel like I'm not alone in this
> craziness, and 2) wonder why on earth THIS is the career I chose? *L* I do
> love my job, but I do nothing but run from the moment I get up. I'm putting
> in 14 hour days 2 or 3 times a week. I think one reason there hasn't been as
> much chatter on the list is that teaching has changed considerably since I
> started teaching. It used to be that if I had a question I had 10,000 art
> teachers just an email away. Now, I am inundated with lesson ideas on every
> website I visit, and if it is a technical decision I can search for an
> answer & find it within seconds.
>
> My day begins as I help teachers in our district with Technology
> Integration. I am the district specialist and I never know if I'm going to
> be helping create videos or podcasts, troubleshooting a troublesome computer
> or projector, hooking up a document camera, installing software, or lately,
> helping to integrate iPads into the classrooms. During this time I am also
> monitoring a HS teacher aide who works on the district webpage (I hope I can
> keep him, and get another student trained since this has freed up a lot of
> my time. If I can't train another student by the time this one graduates
> I'll have to edit the webpage myself again).Then, if I'm lucky, I get 40
> minutes of plan time, followed by HS Art with not only the students in my
> own classroom but students in 2 other towns, via Distance Learning program.
> I have 2 42" plasma tvs and we interact live. It is interesting &
> challenging, to say the least. Have you ever tried to teach ceramics over
> the tv? It can be done, but you have to be pretty creative in walking
> students through their challenges. My next class is a Digital Communications
> class focusing on Photoshop & video editing. We are gearing up to start
> filming basketball games live, so we have that learning challenge ahead of
> us. We also put together the yearbook, which is completely digital.
>
> Quick lunch, then I take my HS teacher aides and get them busy on stocking
> concessions or out to classrooms to help teachers on technology needs. Off I
> go to the intermediate to teach an hour of art class - one grade per week
> (we are a really small district) Mon - Thur 3rd-6th grade, and Friday I have
> 3/4 or 5/6 for a computer class. Back to the high school for a middle school
> art class, followed by HS art where I also have another school via IDL.
> After school I am often running the concession stand (I'm senior class
> sponsor), running FEA meetings (I'm our local NEA president), finishing all
> the technology needs I didn't get to during the school day, teaching
> technology integration classes to teachers, or doing "art teacher jobs" like
> cutting paper or prepping for the next day. I gave up hanging art displays
> long ago. My elementary students finish a project & I hand them sticky tack
> & send them to the hallway to hang their artwork. My end of the hallway at
> the grade school definitely looks like a children's art room! *L*
>
> I can't complain - most of our teachers have had their bulletin boards taken
> down by request. The only boards that survived host year long learning
> stations. Gone are the days of decorating seasonally. Our school is in the
> top 3% academically in the state, and expectations are high to keep them
> there. If a student is failing a class he/she goes to that classroom before
> & after school until their grade is passing. That means if a student is
> failing my class I have to be there at least 30 minutes before school to
> work with them. That means no early morning prep for me (I live 35 miles
> from my school - I refuse to leave my house earlier than 6:45 to get to work
> when I often don't get home before 7 or 8:00 pm).
>
> Also, I am very community oriented, so I write the city newsletter for the
> town I live in, run the city webpage, am president of the local library
> board, and help my husband with grants - he is the fire chief and we have
> replaced all 4 fire trucks through grants and are trying to build a new fire
> station). Oh, and just to prove I'm insane, I started a cake decorating
> business on the side! I think one of the biggest perks of getting older is
> you do get really great time management skills!
>
> Good thing we have time off for holidays & summer vacation. :)
>
> ~ Michal
>>
>> What are your days like?
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: I haven't gotten the digest since Oct. 10
> From: "Michal Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
> Date: Sat, 22 Oct 2011 12:11:32 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 8
>
> San D - I LOVE this line! There is nothing more rewarding than going to the
> store and running into a student you taught 15 years ago be excited to see
> you (usually one of the ones who caused me to have to color the gray out of
> my hair!). Enjoy your "sit" time - you've earned it!
> ~Michal
>
>
> Believe me when I tell you that the other jobs that I had, none of those
> bosses or clients remember my name, but there are thousands of my art
> students that remember mine now.
>
> San D
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: I haven't gotten the digest since Oct. 10
> From: Leslie O'Shaughnessy <lbhdto@hotmail.com>
> Date: Sat, 22 Oct 2011 17:06:42 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 9
>
> Hi San,
>
> Interesting thing is, teaching art is a career change for me, as well. I did accounting/staff management stuff for 12 years, followed by non-profit/meeting planning stuff for 4 years, then political action committee work for 7 years, and graphic design work for 9 years. I totally agree the office stuff was easier, and I didn't have to pull a lesson plan out of my butt if I wanted to be sick.
>
> I concur with you in that I came to teaching to "change a life" which I know I am doing, and that part is rewarding, but there is certainly a lot if character-building stuff along the way :) And, this is the least amount of money I have ever earned. BUT, when I lay my head down at night, I do know I have made a difference in my world. AND, like I tell many others, so much of what I teach is more than art or computer graphics, it is human compassion and civilized behavior ;)
>
> Leslie
>
> On Oct 22, 2011, at 12:22 PM, "San D Hasselman" <shasselman@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>>
>> Dear Leslie in the high school in VA
>>
>> I kept that pace for 35 years, and when I retired last year, I just wanted to sit down. LOL. Everytime I hear anyone malign teachers the hair goes up on the back of my neck. I turn into a witch, and not just for Halloween (although I am present playing one in our local community Haunted House).
>>
>> I worked "in the real world" 7 years before I could get a full time art teaching job, and let me tell you, I worked harder as an educator than I ever did as a graphic designer,printing press operator, secretary in personnel or assistant to a collections lawyer. While "real world" jobs have their unique pressures, job to job, you are never "on" for the whole time as you are as an educator. In the real world you can gossip, go to the bathroom, have lunch for 1 hour, curse if you drop something on your foot, roll your eyes at your boss, and pass the buck. In teaching every word has to be measured, your kidneys have to be strong, and you are the boss, so you can't pass the buck. There is no such thing as a bad hair day, a day where you feel horrible, or a day where you want to slow down. The "show" must go on, while you might have taught the color wheel for 30 years, it is the first time for the kids in front of you and you want them to be excited
> about it. Educators are all too aware that we can, with a look, or a word, harm a student in a way that they won't like our subject matter for the rest of their lives. Believe me when I tell you that the other jobs that I had, none of those bosses or clients remember my name, but there are thousands of my art students that remember mine now.
>>
>> San D
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