Note: To protect the privacy of our members, e-mail addresses have been removed from the archived messages. As a result, some links may be broken.

Find Lesson Plans on getty.edu! GettyGames

RE:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: September 28, 2009

---------

From: Daniel Murren (djmurren_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Fri Oct 02 2009 - 12:52:01 PDT


Here is the link to the Wayne Thiebaud YouTube video. It is really
wonderful! Take a look.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vI_QJ5D9Qm8 or type in YouTube Wayne
Thiebaud-CBS Sunday Morning.

-----Original Message-----
From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
[mailto:teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, September 29, 2009 4:00 AM
To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: September 28, 2009

TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Monday, September 28, 2009.

1. RE: teacherartexchange digest: September 26, 2009
2. RE: plastic picture plane
3. help ordering clay
4. help ordering clay...
5. RE: help ordering clay...
6. RE: plastic picture plane
7. Re: RE:teacherartexchange digest: September 26, 2009
8. Assignments for suspended students
9. RE: Assignments for suspended students
10. participation grades
11. Re: help ordering clay
12. Help with Wayne Thiebaud lesson
13. Re: Assignments for suspended students
14. Re: help ordering clay...
15. Re: Plastic Picture Plane
16. RE: Help with Wayne Thiebaud lesson
17. Re: Plastic Picture Plane
18. buying stools

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: teacherartexchange digest: September 26, 2009
From: "Hillmer, Jan" <HillmJan@Berkeleyprep.org>
Date: Mon, 28 Sep 2009 07:28:57 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Please share a bit more about the YouTube Video.
Thanks!

Jan in Tampa

-----Original Message-----
From: Daniel Murren [mailto:djmurren@verizon.net]
Sent: Sunday, September 27, 2009 8:29 PM
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
Subject: RE:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: September
26, 2009

I am planning to do a lesson on Wayne Thiebaud "Paint a cake". It will
be
done on drawing paper with cheap thin acrylic paint. Is there a way to
make
the paint thicker to add frosting flowers? I don't want anything too
thick
that might fall off the paper. I showed my 6th. and 7th. grade students
a
YouTube video done by CBS Sunday morning show and they were so excited
to
start drawing their ideas for cakes. I posted this before but received
no
replies. Any ideas out there?

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: plastic picture plane
From: Robin Phillips <rphillips@mvsd.net>
Date: Mon, 28 Sep 2009 08:02:14 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Dana,

I use plexiglass sheets donated by a parent and use dry erase markers. I
use it with 6th graders and some of them find it hard to keep the marker
from sliding around. All the lines are pretty shaky, but they get the idea.
I have also used transparency sheets with a grid printed on them for other
"seeing" exercises. They other thing that I use for viewfinders is
stretcher strips assembled in a rectangle or square. With just a little
modeling clay supporting them, they stay up on the tabletop.
I'd love to see your PowerPoints and whatever else you come up with. Thanks
for sharing.

Robin in PA
Subject: Plastic Picture Plane
From: Dana Paternoster <thenatureofart@hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Sep 2009 20:20:30 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

 
I am working on making lessons from the "Drawing on the Right Side of the
Brain" book, and have gotten to the Plastic Picture Plane part.
 
What do you all do about that? Do you make them from scratch? I know I
made some a few years ago at my previous school, but I don't hardly have
that kind of time anymore to make enough for 32 students. Before I made
cardboard frames and taped in overhead projector sheets?
 
Any ideas? Do you just skip those lessons?
 
Thanks in advance.
 
Dana
 
P.S.
If anyone is interested...in a week or so when I finish putting the lessons
together, I will be happy to share what I have typed and the PowerPoints.
Let me know, and I will email them.
_________________________________________________________________

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: help ordering clay
From: paulette keck <paulettekeck@hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Sep 2009 12:16:13 +0000
X-Message-Number: 3

Hello there LIST,

I am lucky enough to be in a brand new
building this year with more equipment than anticipated. I teach 6th
grade art at an arts middle school and I have the room that will become
the high school art room as we grow into a 6-12 school. We have pottery
wheels and drying cabinets and 2 small to medium front loading kilns.
While I don't think we'll get into using the wheels this year, I want
to order a clay that can be used for both hand building and throwing so
I can build up a consistent program.

Its been 10 years since I
taught ceramics of any kind. I typically order out of the Sax catalog,
but am somewhat dumbfounded when I look at all the options. I know I
need some bats, a storage container and clay. What would you suggest?

Thanks so much for your help.
_________________________________________________________________
Bing brings you maps, menus, and reviews organized in one place. Try it
now.
http://www.bing.com/search?q=restaurants&form=MLOGEN&publ=WLHMTAG&crea=TEXT_
MLOGEN_Core_tagline_local_1x1
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: help ordering clay...
From: paulette keck <paulettekeck@hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Sep 2009 12:18:51 +0000
X-Message-Number: 4

Hello there LIST,

I am lucky enough to be in a brand new
building this year with more equipment than anticipated. I teach 6th
grade art at an arts middle school and I have the room that will become
the high school art room as we grow into a 6-12 school. We have pottery
wheels and drying cabinets and 2 small to medium front loading kilns.
While I don't think we'll get into using the wheels this year, I want
to order a clay that can be used for both hand building and throwing so
I can build up a consistent program.

Its been 10 years since I
taught ceramics of any kind. I typically order out of the Sax catalog,
but am somewhat dumbfounded when I look at all the options. I know I
need some bats, a storage container and clay. What would you suggest?

Thanks so much for your help.

Paulette
Bronx Studio School for Writers & Artists
                                               
_________________________________________________________________
Lauren found her dream laptop. Find the PC thats right for you.
http://www.microsoft.com/windows/choosepc/?ocid=ftp_val_wl_290
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: help ordering clay...
From: San D Hasselman <shasselman@hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Sep 2009 12:42:50 +0000
X-Message-Number: 5

Here's what I would get to start a studio. And by the way check your local
artisans they might be able to tell you where the local clay supplier is. We
order in-state, shipping is cheaper and you are dealing with someone that
you can talk to over the phone.
 
Kiln supplies:
shelves
shelf wash
cones (check your clay to see what cone you need to fire the clay)
stilts to hold up shelves
small holders to hold up pottery
gloves
 
Clay supplies
earthenware clay (without grog) (white) wheel work
earthenware clay (red) handbuilding
wedging boards (you can make these yourselves)
piano wire to cut clay
clay tools (loop, fettling)
rolling pins
needle tools
small sponges
containers for water
plastic bags to store work
small boards as bases to put work on to transport (we used cafeteria trays).
canvas
burlap
(bats are a luxury item, you can teach kids how to cut off the pot from
wheel and get pot lifters to remove the work)
 
 
spackle buckets to store clay in (you can get these free at your local
bakery I think icing or something comes in them)
 
glazes
Buy glazes already mixed either from Sax (then make sure it is compatable
with your clay body) or from the supplier.
brushes
large bowls to put work over if you decide to pour glazes, then the bowl
captures glaze for you to pour back into container
underglazes
clear transparent glaze
wax resist (only if you are ready for the smells)
 
that's all I can remember at this time. I haven't taught ceramics in over 20
years.
 
San D
 
 
 

>> Hello there LIST,
>
> I am lucky enough to be in a brand new
> building this year with more equipment than anticipated. I teach 6th
> grade art at an arts middle school and I have the room that will become
> the high school art room as we grow into a 6-12 school. We have pottery
> wheels and drying cabinets and 2 small to medium front loading kilns.
> While I don't think we'll get into using the wheels this year, I want
> to order a clay that can be used for both hand building and throwing so
> I can build up a consistent program.
>
> Its been 10 years since I
> taught ceramics of any kind. I typically order out of the Sax catalog,
> but am somewhat dumbfounded when I look at all the options. I know I
> need some bats, a storage container and clay. What would you suggest?
>
> Thanks so much for your help.
>
> Paulette
> Bronx Studio School for Writers & Artists
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: plastic picture plane
From: Tina Vercelli <tvercelli@ardmore.k12.ok.us>
Date: Mon, 28 Sep 2009 08:14:37 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

I cut a classroom set of frames out of posterboard, laminated them, and then
drew out the quadrants with a sharpie. They work OK, but if I did it over
again, I would use a thicker piece of cardboard.

I like the plexiglass idea...although there's a cost to it, Im sure they
last much longer than mine.

I would also like to see your powerpoint!

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: RE:teacherartexchange digest: September 26, 2009
From: Denise Pannell <cen_aca_dp@nwoca.org>
Date: Mon, 28 Sep 2009 10:00:46 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7

You can add color to ModPodge using watercolor or other paint mediums. It
will dry shiny and semi-transluscent. Acrylic modeling paste might be a
better solution, if you want them to look like creamy frosting. SOunds like
a fun project!

Denise Pannell

http://www.artsonia.com/schools/school.asp?id=36837

> I am planning to do a lesson on Wayne Thiebaud "Paint a cake". It
> will bedone on drawing paper with cheap thin acrylic paint. Is there a
way to
> makethe paint thicker to add frosting flowers?

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Assignments for suspended students
From: Tina Vercelli <tvercelli@ardmore.k12.ok.us>
Date: Mon, 28 Sep 2009 12:51:31 -0500
X-Message-Number: 8

I have several students who are on long term suspensions from our Middle
school. We are still required to "teach" them and provide lessons for them
to do while they are away. I'm running out of simple lessons to send home
for them to do. For obvious reasons they can't do certain projects that we
are doing in class, so I'm needing things that they can do on their own at
home.
Any suggestions?

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Assignments for suspended students
From: Victoria Lambert <Victoria.Lambert@wjusd.org>
Date: Mon, 28 Sep 2009 11:15:43 -0700
X-Message-Number: 9

Altered books?

Victoria Nicholson Lambert
 Art Program Coordinator
C. E. Dingle Elementary School

________________________________________
From: Tina Vercelli [tvercelli@ardmore.k12.ok.us]
Sent: Monday, September 28, 2009 10:51 AM
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
Subject: [teacherartexchange] Assignments for suspended students

I have several students who are on long term suspensions from our Middle
school. We are still required to "teach" them and provide lessons for them
to do while they are away. I'm running out of simple lessons to send home
for them to do. For obvious reasons they can't do certain projects that we
are doing in class, so I'm needing things that they can do on their own at
home.
Any suggestions?

---
To unsubscribe go to
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
Woodland Joint Unified School District has scanned this message for viruses
and dangerous content
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: participation grades
From: "Elizabeth Blair" <BLAIREA@pwcs.edu>
Date: Mon, 28 Sep 2009 14:17:32 -0400
X-Message-Number: 10
Those of you who use these daily progress participation grades, do you have
rubrics that you use?  Or a checklist of some sort?
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: help ordering clay
From: "Dobbelaere" <dobbe@tds.net>
Date: Mon, 28 Sep 2009 15:42:44 -0400
X-Message-Number: 11
Hey I don't know where you live but I get my clay from a local college they 
sell it to th elocal art teachers and we just pick up th ebags everyso often
I have 3 clay cl;asses all year and I order about 30 -35 bags of clay from 
thenm they weigh about 30  pounds each  and cost me about $17 a bag  if I 
order through Sax or United arts I get half as much clay and they charge 
what the clay costs in shipping.  It is a stone ware and we hand build and 
throw on the wheels also make tiles and carved slabs  you might want to 
check with some of your local colleges to see if they also do this service. 
The Prof at the college hires a kid to mix it in th emixers and sells the 
bags.  I just make a P.O.  out to the college.
Sandy Dobbelaere
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "paulette keck" <paulettekeck@hotmail.com>
To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group" 
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Sent: Monday, September 28, 2009 8:16 AM
Subject: [teacherartexchange] help ordering clay
Hello there LIST,
I am lucky enough to be in a brand new
building this year with more equipment than anticipated. I teach 6th
grade art at an arts middle school and I have the room that will become
the high school art room as we grow into a 6-12 school. We have pottery
wheels and drying cabinets and 2 small to medium front loading kilns.
While I don't think we'll get into using the wheels this year, I want
to order a clay that can be used for both hand building and throwing so
I can build up a consistent program.
Its been 10 years since I
taught ceramics of any kind. I typically order out of the Sax catalog,
but am somewhat dumbfounded when I look at all the options. I know I
need some bats, a storage container and clay. What would you suggest?
Thanks so much for your help.
_________________________________________________________________
Bing  brings you maps, menus, and reviews organized in one place.   Try it 
now.
http://www.bing.com/search?q=restaurants&form=MLOGEN&publ=WLHMTAG&crea=TEXT_
MLOGEN_Core_tagline_local_1x1
---
To unsubscribe go to
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Help with Wayne Thiebaud lesson
From: "Daniel Murren" <djmurren@verizon.net>
Date: Mon, 28 Sep 2009 16:13:32 -0400
X-Message-Number: 12
I am planning to do a lesson on Wayne Thiebaud "Paint a cake". It will be
done on drawing paper with cheap thin acrylic paint.  Is there a way to make
the paint thicker to add frosting flowers?  I don't want anything too thick
that might fall off the paper.  I showed my 6th. and 7th. grade students a
YouTube video done by CBS Sunday morning show and they were so excited to
start drawing their ideas for cakes.  Any ideas out there?
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Assignments for suspended students
From: Judy Decker <jdecker4art@gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Sep 2009 16:44:59 -0400
X-Message-Number: 13
Greetings Tina,
I always took pretty good care of my suspended students (of course,
never suspended for anything they did in art class).
Altered Books - or Altered Book tip in pages - is an excellent
suggestion. I am not sure how far the students would go without
instruction. There is a lesson on Incredible Art Department as well as
examples of Tip In pages. If you need help on what a Tip In page is,
write to me off list (do not post a reply that includes my email
address - please).
Another suggestion would be a collage that deals with some kind of
social injustice using old magazines. There are lessons on IAD about
social comment. Maybe - just maybe you will get the students to think
about their own behaviour?
Have them work on a portrait of sorts about a personal hero (and write
why that person is a hero). I do have some Heroes lessons on IAD, too.
My mind is just swimming with more ideas for you - but I have already
spent way too much time answering questions/emails today (9:00 am to
4:40 pm is a long time to be at a computer -- oh, I did take a few
breaks - but not for long -- smile). Mind you, I am enjoying getting
back into a bit of my "former life" - but now have more things to
attend to.
Best wishes,
Judy Decker
Reminder to all members: Please remember to remove email addresses
when you click reply. It only takes a second of your time.
On Mon, Sep 28, 2009 at 1:51 PM, Tina Vercelli wrote:
> I have several students who are on long term suspensions from our Middle
> school. We are still required to "teach" them and provide lessons for them
> to do while they are away. I'm running out of simple lessons to send home
> for them to do. For obvious reasons they can't do certain projects that we
> are doing in class, so I'm needing things that they can do on their own at
> home.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: help ordering clay...
From: "Sidnie Miller" <SMILLER@elko.k12.nv.us>
Date: Mon, 28 Sep 2009 13:50:52 -0700
X-Message-Number: 14
Hi Paulette,  I would try to find a local supplier for clay--I drive 3
hours to a big
city to get clay--the cost of shipping is often more than the clay
itself.   I would
recommend that you use low fire  cone 05 clay--it's way cheaper to fire
and the
kids aren't going to be making sets of dishes anyway.  I have always
made coffee cups
out of low fire clay and they are fine--use the dishwasher and
everything.  There is
a huge array of glazes for cone 05--there are underglaze watercolors
also so the 
students can really experiment.  I fire greenware and glazed pots in
the same load
which saves tons of time and money.  Most people will tell you this
isn't a good idea,
but it works for me with no problems.  I keep the clay in old 5 gal.
buckets and
recycle constantly.  I use the old clay boxes to make cardboard squares
that the
kids put their work on--heavy stuff might need wood, but I got some of
that from
the shop teacher.  I keep all the bags the clay comes in and use it for
storage of
kids' work.  I have students turn their greenware in on a shelf by the
kiln.  I put
it in the kiln right away, and when it's full I turn it on all night
with the lid open and then
I fire the next day.  That way I don't worry about whether it's dry
completely--it will
be by the next day.  Let me know if you have specific questions.  Sid
>>> paulette keck <paulettekeck@hotmail.com> 9/28/2009 5:18 AM >>>
Hello there LIST,
I am lucky enough to be in a brand new
building this year with more equipment than anticipated. I teach 6th
grade art at an arts middle school and I have the room that will
become
the high school art room as we grow into a 6-12 school. We have
pottery
wheels and drying cabinets and 2 small to medium front loading kilns.
While I don't think we'll get into using the wheels this year, I want
to order a clay that can be used for both hand building and throwing
so
I can build up a consistent program.
Its been 10 years since I
taught ceramics of any kind. I typically order out of the Sax catalog,
but am somewhat dumbfounded when I look at all the options.  I know I
need some bats, a storage container and clay. What would you suggest?
Thanks so much for your help.
Paulette
Bronx Studio School for Writers & Artists
     
_________________________________________________________________
Lauren found her dream laptop. Find the PC thatb
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Plastic Picture Plane
From: "Dulcius" <dulcius@mailnew.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Sep 2009 18:10:06 -0400
X-Message-Number: 15
I use them for two of the projects on my Artsonia page from last year - the 
Hand Ribbon Contour, based on the Betty Edwards exercise, and the Negative 
Space Plant Collage.  I tell the kids the Picture Planes are like training 
wheels - just a way to get used to things, but they won't use (or need) it 
for long, because the goal is to "internalize" it.  I think it works great 
to get them used to the concepts of contour and negative space.  After each 
of those two projects, we do a related project WITHOUT the "P.P.'s".  I have
found they are so much more successful on these subsequent projects after 
having worked with these simple tools.
-Lydia in Toledo
Toledo School for the Arts, 
http://www.artsonia.com/schools/school.asp?id=95054
----- Original Message ----- 
From: <occasm@aol.com>
To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group" 
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Sent: Sunday, September 27, 2009 11:53 PM
Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] Plastic Picture Plane
I made these as well a few years back and you used them once. Did the
hand drawing exercise from the Edward's book. Besides using them as
straight viewfinders for observation (which I might do), how do you
guys use them?
Mike Sacco
PJG JHS
Setauket, NY
-----Original Message-----
From: Dulcius <dulcius@mailnew.com>
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Sent: Sun, Sep 27, 2009 11:35 pm
Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] Plastic Picture Plane
While these are definitely not as long-lasting as the plexi idea, I use
ones I made using some overhead transparency frames that were in my
school's supply room; I don't think anyone had a use for them, but I
did! They're made from poster-board weight white cardboard, they have
about a 1.5" frame all around, with rounded corners and an opening big
enough to tape an overhead transparency into. I just printed out a
sheet with the "quadrants" on it, then photocopied it onto transparency
sheets, then taped them into the frames. So far, I've used my original
set of them with 5 classes, and they're holding up ok.
-Lydia in Toledo
Toledo School for the Arts
----- Original Message ----- From: "watercolorwiz"
<watercolorwiz@bellsouth.net>
To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Sent: Sunday, September 27, 2009 9:57 PM
Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] Plastic Picture Plane
0A
I use Plexiglas, 8 x 10, divided into quadrants with Sharpie. Lasts
forever; relatively cheap, much more stable to make those vis-a-vis
marks upon!
________________________________
From: Dana Paternoster <thenatureofart@hotmail.com>
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Sent: Sunday, September 27, 2009 7:20:30 PM
Subject: [teacherartexchange] Plastic Picture Plane
I am working on making lessons from the "Drawing on the Right Side of
the Brain" book, and have gotten to the Plastic Picture Plane part.
What do you all do about that? Do you make them from scratch? I know I
made some a few years ago at my previous school, but I don't hardly
have that kind of time anymore to make enough for 32 students. Before I
made cardboard frames and taped in overhead projector sheets?
Any ideas? Do you just skip those lessons?
Thanks in advance.
Dana
P.S.
If anyone is interested...in a week or so when I finish putting the
lessons together, I will be happy to share what I have typed and the
PowerPoints. Let me know, and I will email them.
_________________________________________________________________
Insert movie times and more without leaving Hotmail..
http://windowslive.com/Tutorial/Hotmail/QuickAdd?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_HM_Tutori
al_QuickAdd_062009
--- 
To unsubscribe go to
http://www
.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
--- 
To unsubscribe go to
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
--- 
To unsubscribe go to
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
---
To unsubscribe go to
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: RE: Help with Wayne Thiebaud lesson
From: "Sears, Ellen" <ELLEN.SEARS@Anchorage.kyschools.us>
Date: Mon, 28 Sep 2009 22:04:37 -0400
X-Message-Number: 16
I have been thinking about what you want to do - for some reason I
thought one of my collage books mentioned paint with spackle  - but when
I googled it said it would flake off...
Cake decorators would make flowers etc., separately - maybe the kids
could make flowers and things to add to the cake... or build up areas
with toilet paper and glue. Or maybe they could build up the base
(cardboard, tissue...)
(maintenance guy is cleaning my room... he said spackling would work...
he also said go by one Home Depot or Lowes - there is always new
stuff... he used to work in construction)
This was on a painting site:
Hello
Well yes and no! Yes you can add DRY spackle powder to paint to thicken
it up to achieve a texture type paint, and also yes you can add this to
your paint that has been tinted. However I still recommend that once you
create your texture effect on the wall, come back and apply at least one
coat of just paint over the top. This will seal up the texture and
protect it, because when you mix the spackle with the paint the finish
is going to be very porous and will fingerprint and scuff very easy. Now
to me, I think its much easier to buy a textured paint already premixed.
It usually comes in a 2-gallon bucket, its smooth or has sand in it, and
not only do you not have to mess of mixing your own you also will be
sure to get same consistancy every time which will make your job a
little easier. Still recommend painting over this!
Good luck! Let me know how you do or if I can be of any more help to you
with this.
There was one that mentioned joint compound:
Yes, we just built a playroom and used a 5 gallon bucket of joint
compound to texture the walls. Thin it out a little adding extra water
(just a little) then use a deep nap roller to roll it on (it will help
you build up your arm muscles). Then take a mud knife and run it over
the texturing lightly to level out the high spots. The playroom looks
great but I suggest trying out some test peices before you get to the
real thing so you know how to make it all work.  Let me know if you use
this and how it turns out
I did find this site - looks fun:
http://www.nga.gov/education/classroom/interactive/cake.htm
-----Original Message-----
From: Daniel Murren [mailto:djmurren@verizon.net] 
Sent: Monday, September 28, 2009 4:14 PM
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
Subject: [teacherartexchange] Help with Wayne Thiebaud lesson
I am planning to do a lesson on Wayne Thiebaud "Paint a cake". It will
be
done on drawing paper with cheap thin acrylic paint.  Is there a way to
make
the paint thicker to add frosting flowers?  I don't want anything too
thick
that might fall off the paper.  I showed my 6th. and 7th. grade students
a
YouTube video done by CBS Sunday morning show and they were so excited
to
start drawing their ideas for cakes.  Any ideas out there?
---
To unsubscribe go to 
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Plastic Picture Plane
From: "go4art@juno.com" <go4art@juno.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Sep 2009 07:40:49 GMT
X-Message-Number: 17
Dana, it would be great if you shared what you have developed! 
I made mine like Lydia and they are holding up fine. We have taped them to
the windows to use. Also, students take them home and make the drawing of
their room or view from window as basis for enlarging for a painting.
Afterward, we look at artist examples who have been inspired by the same
subjects.
"made using some overhead transparency frames ....I just printed out a sheet
with the "quadrants" 
on it, then photocopied it onto transparency sheets, then taped them into
the frames. "   
creatively, Linda Kieling
middle school in Oregon 
____________________________________________________________
Wanna lose weight?  Weight Loss Programs that work. Click here.
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL2141/fc/BLSrjpTFoYc3CoU3ylOWeUH0eSVDhX4K
HMXekZmC2X7TQfCwCnZi7U1tWa0/
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: buying stools
From: "go4art@juno.com" <go4art@juno.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Sep 2009 07:48:09 GMT
X-Message-Number: 18
I have 18" high stools in the art classroom studio and we have finally run
out of reserves. These have metal legs with a ring inside the stool legs and
an inset piece of masonite on the seat.  I like that part because students
have painted them, but they also stand on the ring which is only lightly
welded!!  I am looking to replace them with something that is hopefully
sturdier, Does anyone have any suggestions?
thanks in advance,
Linda Kieling
middle school in Oregon 
____________________________________________________________
Cheap Diet Help Tips. Click here.
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL2141/fc/BLSrjpTMerrvqgHY0BLJoFmfuAIGqDm8
K1pxVodr7LrTJwiWNDFELEEapfq/
---
END OF DIGEST
---
leave-648879-349383.062f67e83ae4d20ec139d8fa97f7d3fb@lists.pub.getty.edu
---
To unsubscribe go to 
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html