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Re:[teacherartexchange] is clipart ever okay?

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From: Ted and/or Patti Siegel (ted_siegel_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Wed Oct 01 2008 - 15:30:59 PDT


On Oct 1, 2008, at 3:01 AM, TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
wrote:
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> I think teaching drawing is important; I just praised a group of 9th
> graders earlier today for their fabulous concentration as they
> tackled blind contour line drawing. I love to draw; 95% of my work
> is from direct observation rather than from photos, and when I teach
> drawing I teach from direct observation. However, I am not going to
> be such a purist that I will never use commercially available images
> like clipart or stencils. When the student council kids come in and
> need to make posters and signs in five minutes a little clipart can
> come in mighty handy. Past art classes might not have drawn
> everything we need. Part of the wonder of the Internet is the
> amazing bounty of information and images available. We should be
> teaching our kids how to work with it in a responsible manner. When
> I teach 12th graders who don't want to be in art but have to have
> another elective to fill their schedules, I might let them use a
> stencil in their design so that it "looks good." When they feel
> successful about a project then they will trust me as I gently guide
> them into doing their own drawing. Besides, what is creativity and
> originality? There are successful artists who appropriate other
> images and make them their own. The 18th century French essayist
> Montaigne said there are no new ideas under the sun. In the 21st
> century we should be teaching our students how to reconstruct,
> recombine, and transform the visual culture that is all around them,
> and clipart is a part of that visual culture. Finally, if it's not
> okay for the art teachers to use clipart, why should the math
> teachers use it? Shouldn't math teachers learn how to draw? I
> certainly had to learn a lot of math--all the way through pre-
> calculus, which is more math than most people ever use in their day
> to day existence. To say that the math teachers can use the clip
> art, because they obviously can't draw, implies the reverse, that
> art teachers don't have the brains for math. I am tired of these
> kinds of stereotypes.

By the way, Cheryl, the idea about the triangular crayons for grouping
is great. I hope they sell those at Dick Blick.

Patti Siegel
St. Louis, MO
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>
> Subject: Re: Art Education Clipart
> From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2008 10:18:18 -0600
> X-Message-Number: 4
>
> The most effective clip art is the art that you or your students
> create.
> Just photograph or scan it into your computer and keep a file for
> future use. It really backs up the concept of being original and
> creative for your students. Let the math teachers use the clip art.
> Woody
>
> On Sep 30, 2008, at 10:02 AM, Cheryl Lloyd wrote:
>
>> Hello all,
>>
>> I found this great website for clipart. I'm not sure if it has been
>> mentioned before, but I thought I would share. It's great for notes
>> home. It has some cute art clipart but also teaching in general.
>>
>> http://school.discoveryeducation.com/clipart/category/art.html
>>
>>
>> Cheri Lloyd
>
>
> Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
> Read My Blog:
> http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysBlog08/September.html
>
> Watercolors on Note Cards
> http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysWatercolor/NoteCards.html
>
> 35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
> http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
>
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