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Re: artsednet digest: October 02, 2000

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From: dennycat (dennycat_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Tue Oct 03 2000 - 22:25:22 PDT


RE- small middle school lesson plans
1. I do oil pastel with grade 7 students. First we study impressionism
as the art history basis then I have students select a calendar or
postcard picture of a landscape. (Give them bonus points for bringing in
old calendars or approach a bookstore for a bargain on old ones) The kids
do their work on 8 x10 pieces of cartridge paper with a 6 x 8 box for
their image in the middle ( saves on the mess of going over the edge onto
the table) , you can try bigger if you think the group is patient enough.
With a quick sample of a picture already 1/2 done, I ask groups of 4 to
come up to my desk to see a demonstration on the dab and colour mixing
techniques for no more than 3 minutes. I make them stand 2 on each side
behind me so that I can still see the rest of the class. For weaker
students I let them copy a postcard size impressionist picture if they
feel 'translating a photo image ' into an impressionist picture is too
difficult. this lesson is very successful with most kids.
2. Linear perspective - Have them use linear perspective to build their
names. I teach them the basics of two point perspective on the overhead,
one step at a time, stopping to make sure I don't lose anyone. Once they
have the basics we do a short art history lesson on surrealism featuring
mostly Dali and De Chirco. Then we do their names in watercolour pencils.
Almost all kids are successful and they love it because it is their name.
Each student in a group of four is numbered 1-4 and they all have their
jobs to do. I don't ask them to decide amongst themselves as to who does
what because they spend so much time squabbling. Each group has a tray of
supplies and they return the tray to a bookshelf where I am usually
standing and I check the materials before they leave. Hope this helps,
Catharine