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Lesson Plans


Re: artsednet-digest V2 #1085

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Norma Navarro (nnavarro)
Mon, 30 Nov 1998 15:28:50 -0700 (MST)


n Response to Teen Suicide posted by William Lyman:
When I think of teen suicide, which is significantly higher for lesbain and
gay youth, I also think of the innovative ways youth resist depression and
hopelessness. In my high school days and currently myself and other
friends created our own zines. Most of the time they were meant to make
us laugh at society and our own lives. They also gave us the opportunity
to write out and tell our stories- many of the stories were about pain and
violence. The coolest thing about writing zines and distributing them is
other teens write you back and say hey I am going through something
similar. The world seems less hopeless when you are not alone. I would
suggest through youth zines, a lot of youth are using the web to
distribute them. Go check it out.
Norma D.N.

On Mon, 23 Nov 1998, artsednet-digest wrote:

>
> artsednet-digest Monday, November 23 1998 Volume 02 : Number 1085
>
>
>
> This edition includes :
> Re: museum resource center
> I.D. Teen Suicide
> ID:OSU-THE WEB OF LIFE
> beauty
> ID OSU Ecofeminism
> ID:OSU
> Re: artsednet-digest V2 #1084-Suzanne Bates, fundraising
> ID OSU
> id.osu art and technology
> Eric Carle is Mr. Rogers' neighbor!
> ID.OSU
> fun book
> Ky-TN conference
> Re: beauty
> Re: artsednet-digest V2 #1082
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 09:55:19 -0500
> From: Karen Hurt <khurt>
> Subject: Re: museum resource center
>
> Mary Copeland wrote:
>
> My students do not
>
> > visit the museums, and teachers are unaware of the many, many
> > resources available to them. My thesis project is to create a museum
> > resource center in Decatur to service not only DISD, but also the
> > surrounding schools in Wise County. Teachers will come to the
> > resource center here in Decatur, check out prints, videos, books,
> > slides, etc. and use them in their classrooms.
>
> Dear Mary -- First, a question -- are you trying to get art teachers to
> use your resources or all teachers?
>
> If you want a mix of users, I would look at what your state curriculum
> requires that teachers teach and what content students are tested on.
> These are the areas where classroom teachers get stale and need new ideas.
>
> There has recently been a shake-up in Virginia, as new Standards of
> Learning were put into place within the past few years, and many teachers
> who taught one subject the same way for years are now required to teach
> completely different material or choose to switch grade levels. Those who
> enjoy expanding beyond the basics or teaching in an
> integrated/interdisciplinary style need new materials and resources.
>
> There is also new cognitive information that recommends connecting
> material to larger thematic units which deal with and build upon
> experiences and community related topics -- the key is connections to what
> students know and want to know. If I were you, I would look for and
> survey some teachers who are teaching more than just "Weekly Reader"
> units, and find out what there needs are and what the interests of
> students in the community are.
>
> Sounds wonderful. Keep us posted.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 10:08:01 -0500
> From: William Lyman <lyman.2>
> Subject: I.D. Teen Suicide
>
> My life-center issue research report in my class will be addressing
> the main issues surrounding suicides among adolescents/young adults,
> particulary among gay and lesbian students in public/private schools.
> There will be an attempt to answer these concerns in regards to the
> visible and invisible aspect of this cultural phenomenon as it relates
> to suicide prevention by employing visual art. I have found several
> artists that personally have dealt with this issues in their personal
> lives and have illusrated these experiances in their works of art. Part
> of this research report reguirement is to center on a lesson plan for
> the sole of opening up dialog for classroom discussions in dealing with
> suicide awareness and prevention. If you like to share your imput on
> this issue please feel free to do so.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 15:18:10 +0000
> From: Jennifer Freshwater <freshwater.6>
> Subject: ID:OSU-THE WEB OF LIFE
>
> I'm doing a project on the Web of Life and how species are connected to
> each other and to the earth. I'm looking for artists who deal with this
> issue and strategies for teaching this issue. Any assistance would be
> appreciated.
>
> Thanks,
> Jennifer
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 10:23:21 -0500
> From: marcia m eaton <marciameaton>
> Subject: beauty
>
> The question raised about "beauty in motion" in kaleidescopes and the
> subsequent examplesof other beautifully things as they moving have been,
> dare I say it, Beautiful! Here's a related question: There are somethings
> (statues, landscapes) that seem to involve motion not just on the part of
> the object but also the viewer. One can't really appreciate a forest, for
> instance, without walking around in it. And often senses other than sight
> are involved; again the forest is a good example. In Eurocentric cultures
> we tend to associate beauty primarily with sight and hearing, but think how
> much the smell of a forest or a seashore can matter to our aesthetic
> appreciation of it. And of course we are forbidden from touching objects
> in museums---but don't many sculptures make you want to run your hands over
> their surfaces? One good questions to raise with your students might be
> whether beautiful sounds, sights, smells, etc. have anything in common. Why
> do we use the same word to describe them all? Marcia
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 11:03:45 -0500
> From: Erin Sawhill <sawhill.2>
> Subject: ID OSU Ecofeminism
>
> I am developing a lesson around the ideas of ecofeminism. If anyone has
> any images of a feminist protest or environmental protest; or a
> ecofeminist protest and can send them to me that would be wonderful. I
> need this image to compare and contrast two images; the first is showing
> women as a "mother earth" and the second is showing women in protest
> (the role of women has changed to "mother earth protecter"). Any info
> on this topic would be helpful. Thanks.
> Erin Sawhill
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 11:08:23 -0500
> From: Nicole Rickard <rickard.11>
> Subject: ID:OSU
>
> Hi! I am continuing my work on the life-centered issue of animal rights.
> In my presentation I have identified the principle of animal rights as:
> nonhuman animals deserving to live according to their own nature, free
> from harm and abuse. I am researching the visible aspects surrounding
> animals rights such as: humans exploiting animals for their own gain
> because "animal cruelty is deeply embedded in our society- in the way we
> eat and dress, in the products we use and even in the ways we chose to
> entertain ourselves". For a presentation to students for a studio
> project I would like them to think about the invisible aspects, that
> most of this abuse and torture is unnecessary. Some of my concerns
> include how to handle such difficult and controversial material as
> animal rights without any parents breathing down my neck.(I have
> gathered most of my information from The Animal Rights Handbook).
>
> Thank you, Nicole Rickard
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 11:19:59 EST
> From: Zuzu4211
> Subject: Re: artsednet-digest V2 #1084-Suzanne Bates, fundraising
>
> Dear Suzanne
> Years ago I ran an art/craft program from a library. We had no budget, at
> all. Desperate, I went to the community. I handed out a wish list and asked
> people to look in their houses for things we could use. One woman came in
> with a hundred large cardboard cones that used to have industrial thread on
> them. another brought in paintbrushes that her factory donated. We got some
> very unusual supplies, but managed to used almost everything. The local
> Jamesway donated paint and paper, Burger King gave us reams of paper. It was
> a great community effort, and a lot of fun.
> sincerely, shelley
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 11:38:57 -0500
> From: Renee Mills <mills.164>
> Subject: ID OSU
>
> For my life centered issue project in Dr. Krug's Art Education class I
> deal with Ecological Restoration. My focus is on the coming together of
> rural and urban communties. My focus artist is Agnes Denes. On of her
> works is called Wheatfield. This field was harvested and then send to
> horses stabled by the New York City Police Department, and also send
> around the world in a end of hunger exhibition. This is
> a life centered issue because hunger affects everbody. Either you turn
> on the television and are asked to send money around the world or you
> are in need of food.
> The visible aspects of the work is what you see. The viewer sees a
> beautiful wheatfield set among the skyscrapers of downtown Manhatten.
> The invisible aspects of this work are the emotions people internalize
> from viewing the work.
> Wheatfield affected people of all ages and the people of Manhatten
> wanted Denes to continue the work. I believe it made people think about
> the mismanagment of resources in America and brought them back to their
> senses. What do you think?
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 11:45:50 -0500
> From: heidi bohl <bohl.5>
> Subject: id.osu art and technology
>
> hello!!! I am still researchng the topic of art and technology for a
> project on life centered issues. I have decided to deal with this issue
> because computer technology is important in our society today. I want
> to emphasize how computer technology has influenced the way we produce
> and learn about art. I feel children need to learn how to use
> computers, in the art room, because it is an artistic medium. Two
> artists that I have been looking at are Cecil Herring and Charles
> Kohlhase. Through these artists i believe students can begin to see the
> visible and invisible aspects of computer technology used in art.
> For a lesson, I will like the students to investigate other artists and
> discover factors that have brought about this medium in art creation. To
> further my research, I would appreciate any suggestions on other
> performance objectives that would be useful towards my issue. In the
> past I have received personal e-mail and I thank those who have already
> helped --
> take care--heidi
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 09:00:51 -0700
> From: "Sheryl Ann McCoy" <smccoy>
> Subject: Eric Carle is Mr. Rogers' neighbor!
>
> Greetings all:
> Thanks to the wonderful person who told us about Eric Carle's website last summer. If you didn't go there then, you might want to see what Eric Carle is about. You can sign up to get a great fold-out poster of Mr. Carle working.
> I just received a postcard from www.eric-carle.com telling me that Mr. Rogers visited Eric Carle's studio where they painted the tissue papers, made a collage and read from Eric's book "From Head to Toe".
> The segment is #1721, and it will be rebroadcast on December 21, 1998. I can't wait to tell my daughter. We love Mr. Rogers and Eric Carle.
> If you are "too old" for Mr. Rogers, please excuse this gushy email.
> Best regards,
> Sheryl A. McCoy
> - ---
> "Nature uses only the longest threads to weave her
> patterns, so that each small piece of her fabric
> reveals the organization of the entire tapestry."
> - -Richard Feynman
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Join 18 million Eudora users by signing up for a free Eudora Web-Mail account at http://www.eudoramail.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 12:43:41 -0500
> From: Hong-Kyu Lee <lee.350>
> Subject: ID.OSU
>
> My art education class is working on issue based inquiry papers which
> include life-centered issues to explain what we are going to teach
> children about and how we are going to teach these ideas. My
> life-centered issue deals with recycling discarded materials to create a
> work of art. Throughout the history of our civilization, men have been
> using whatever is available to them. However, as a result of
> our enormous use/consumption from the natural resources, it
> has become an important issue to conserve the natural resources. I need
> to find some inquiry questions for students about this issue. If you
> have any ideas, please inform me. Thank you. Hong Lee.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 14:58:43 -0500
> From: "Fields, Linda" <fieldsl.us>
> Subject: fun book
>
> If you haven't yet run across the book called Incredible Ned by Bill Maynard
> and Frank Remkiewicz, check it out. It's a kids' book that gives art
> teachers credit for their understanding. I have bought several copies for
> the children in my life-ordered mine through Barnes and Noble. Linda in NC
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 15:01:49 -0500
> From: "Fields, Linda" <fieldsl.us>
> Subject: Ky-TN conference
>
> To all my new acquaintances in Kentucky and Tennessee-thanks so much for
> your hospitality and interest at your Arrowmont Conference last weekend. I
> enjoyed meeting all of you and hope anyone who can will go for National
> Board Certification. Let me know if I can help and how you're doing. Linda
> in NC
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 12:58:06 -0800 (PST)
> From: "R. Moore" <ronmoore>
> Subject: Re: beauty
>
> Marcia asks whether I or any other subscriber knows the French term for
> beautiful violence. Of course I don't, Marcia--you know how rudimentary
> my French is! (I once actually ordered the cover charge in a Parisian
> bistro.) My guess is that has something to do with football or marriage,
> though.
> Ron
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 13:08:47 -0800 (PST)
> From: "R. Moore" <ronmoore>
> Subject: Re: artsednet-digest V2 #1082
>
> Liz, in Rural NY points out that we often think of things in motion as
> beautiful. This is very important, since most of the examples of beauty
> we have been considering (and Marcia and I mention in our "walk") have
> been static objects. It DOES seem to me that we are frequently pleased
> aesthetically by natural motion. I vividly recall being riveted by the
> simple, sinuous beauty of the constantly changing lines of colored sand
> through which a small stream was running, on the Oregon Coast. What is it
> about such things that grabs us? Is it the tacit analogy to human motion,
> the sensuous action of the human body? Is it something even more
> primitive, the systole and diastole of life itself? Is it our
> appreciation of the inteplay of pattern and turbulence, or rhythm, or
> graceful flow? I think this is a wonderful area to explore, one on which
> philosophers have had little to say, by the way. I think kids could have
> a field day (no pun intended) with it.
> Ron Moore
>
> On Sun, 22 Nov 1998, artsednet-digest wrote:
>
> >
> > artsednet-digest Sunday, November 22 1998 Volume 02 : Number 1082
> >
> >
> >
> > This edition includes :
> > Re: Art images resource
> > ID:AZ RESPONSE TO CANCER AND ART
> > Re: Wall Paintings
> > MFA Programs available for distance learning
> > Re: beauty and motion
> > sandplay
> > (no subject)
> > Re: Art tests
> > Re: Art tests
> > Industrial Arts
> > (no subject)
> > Re: Industrial Arts
> > Re: beauty and motion
> > You can handle them all!
> > (no subject)
> > beauty - destruction of; esp. religious
> > Langer
> > Re: beauty and motion
> >
> > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >
> > Date: Sat, 21 Nov 1998 17:03:05 -0500
> > From: Joseph Augusta <jaugusta>
> > Subject: Re: Art images resource
> >
> > > Have you tried the Artchive ?
> > > (http://www.artchive.com)
> > > I have found that site indespensible !
> >
> > OK Amy! The Artchive site's OK, if a bit Eurocentric for this
> > contemporary American!
> >
> > BUT, if we're talking European artists may as well take a look at the
> > work of one of my favorites, from a show I attended way back when in the
> > dark days of 1974:
> >
> > http://www.artsednet.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/Images/Ecology/america.html
> >
> > Thanks to the Getty, no less!
> >
> > Best wishes,
> > Joseph
> >
> > ------------------------------
> >
> > Date: Sat, 21 Nov 1998 16:31:09 -0700 (MST)
> > From: Sharolyn Benfell <benfell>
> > Subject: ID:AZ RESPONSE TO CANCER AND ART
> >
> > Hi, Lynn. I believe I am one of your assigned partners. I want to try
> > to
> > respond to your 19NOV entry on ArtsEdNet regarding cancer and art. Since
> > I am not sure exactly what you need and my personal experience with the
> > subject is pretty limited, I thought I would just share some of my
> > thoughts with you. I am sorry I can't be more helpful. Anyway.....
> > I find cancer to be pretty terrifying to think about. My mother's
> > husband was recently found to have some cancer of the liver, I believe,
> > and they are now in the process of trying to determin whether they have
> > succeeded in removing all of it or not. I can hear the fear in my
> > mother's voice and the anger in his voice. My contact with them is by
> > phone since they live outside my home area. Anyway, my sense is that they
> > are very worried and going forward the best they can.
> > To tell you the truth I am a little at a loss as to how you take
> > these kinds of things into K-12 art classrooms. Not that I don't think it
> > should be dealt with if it can be usefully, you understand? Do I
> > understand correctly that the slides you presented in your class are ones
> > that could be taken into k-12 classroom and discussed from a
> > critical/aesthetic/historical standpoint? So, I guess I just answered my
> > own question......that is how you could take these issues into the art
> > classroom. I think that if I was going to try that, I would want to be
> > sure to do homework myself to be sure I could handle any emotional
> > expressions that might be elicited. I can see that you just might trip
> > the trigger for any student who had a close personal experience with this
> > kind of fear and pain.
> > Another thought.....would the art therapy world be a place where
> > you could find information helpful to you in this assignment?
> > Good luck on your search. I will be watching to see if there are
> > any further comments on the subject. Sharolyn Benfell
> >
> > ------------------------------
> >
> > Date: Sat, 21 Nov 1998 15:57:50 -0800 (PST)
> > From: Sidnie Miller <sidmill.us>
> > Subject: Re: Wall Paintings
> >
> > We took images and photocopied them on transparencies and used an overhead
> > to put them on the wall. Then we traced the designs with a black Sharpie
> > and then painted with light washes of acrylic. Painting over the concrete
> > blocks was really hard because of all the little pits. If your whole
> > design is only 1 block large, I'd go all out with preparation and fill in
> > all the holes with spackle, prime with white latex and then proceed. Sid
> >
> > ###########################
> > # Sidnie Miller #
> > # Elko Junior High School #
> > # 777 Country Club Drive #
> > # Elko, NV 89801 #
> > # 702-738-7236 #
> > ###########################
> >
> > ------------------------------
> >
> > Date: Sat, 21 Nov 1998 17:44:43 -0600
> > From: RJD <drewyor>
> > Subject: MFA Programs available for distance learning
> >
> > The Vermont Low Residency program does not do summers. I think you
> > meet at the beginning of the semester. January and September; I think.
> > Did somebody mention if another school has a summer MFA program? If
> > you are a teacher now, surely you could get vacation time off to go to
> > school.
> > I was a substitute high school teacher working my way through my B.A.
> > degree and teachers were taking a week off or two constantly.
> >
> > Richard
> >
> > ------------------------------
> >
> > Date: Sat, 21 Nov 1998 20:27:14 EST
> > From: DRLanders
> > Subject: Re: beauty and motion
> >
> > I agree,
> > Other motion that we think are beautiful:
> > The waves meeting the shore, Leaves rustling in the wind, Shooting stars.
> >
> > ------------------------------
> >
> > Date: Sat, 21 Nov 1998 20:49:37 -0500
> > From: "joym" <joym>
> > Subject: sandplay
> >
> > The therapy approach you are inquiring about is actually called "sandtray",
> > developed by Dora Kalff. In sandtray therapy one expresses themselves via
> > three dimentional sand "pictures", using the sand and archetypal figures
> > chosen from a wide variety that are made available. The "pictures" and
> > their symbolic meanings are explored with the therapist, and are seen as
> > representations of one's view of life & connection with it. Sandtray
> > therapy is used with children as well as adults.When I looked into post
> > Masters training in sandtray it was quite a process. Admission to study
> > required "a university education in medicine, psychology, pedagogy,
> > theology, clinical social work or marriage & family counseling." Training
> > included at least 100 hours in seminars, at least 2 papers, a minimum of 30
> > hours of supervision, a case study report, and on-going continuing
> > education. Successful completion of the training requirements allows one to
> > be eligible for membership in the International Society for Sandtray
> > Therapy.
> >
> > Joy Moody
> > art therapist/basketmaker
> >
> > ------------------------------
> >
> > Date: Sat, 21 Nov 1998 22:49:00 EST
> > From: Artgotch
> > Subject: (no subject)
> >
> > I'm in the process of putting together a middle school program for a computer
> > graphics class. We will be using Mac-G3's and have the following software
> > available: Dabbler, ClarisWorks, KidPix, Painter, Photoshop, Typestyler and
> > Poser, a digital camera, plus a color printer. I would appreciate any lesson
> > suggestion and in turn would share mine. Thanks in advance.
> >
> > ------------------------------
> >
> > Date: Sat, 21 Nov 1998 23:40:40 EST
> > From: EVasso
> > Subject: Re: Art tests
> >
> > Sandra wrote:
> >
> > > <<We don't teach Art just to give kids wonderful
> > > creative experiences -- we expect them to learn something as well. The
> > > best way to see if they've learned it is to design interesting problems
> > > for them to solve -- which is really a type of test.>>
> >
> > and Fred replied:
> >
> > > I'm confused by the way you pose the two alternatives: a wonderful creative
> > > experience on the one hand, learning something on the other. I always
> > thought
> > > that the best way to see if my students had learned something was to see if
> > > THEY could design interesting problems to solve -- which is really their
> > art.
> > > Was I wrong?
> >
> > <And Maggie wrote:
> >
> > <Not wrong, just misinterpreting what Sandra wrote. She's not posing two
> > <alternatives;
> > <she's expecting them to have a creative experience AS WELL AS learning
> > <something.
> > <I'm not so sure the average student is capable of designing problems on his
> > own the
> > <way a professional artist does; to me, part of teaching is to design problems
> > for <them
> > <to interpret and solve in a creative manner. Of course, there are a very few
> > students
> > <who are already capable of working independently, creating their own
> > assignments
> > <("problems") and working through them, while learning new media and
> > techniques. <Those
> > <get to work on independent study in my classes.
> >
> >
> > Dear Maggie,
> >
> > Not wrong or a misinterpretation, Maggie. Just being ironic. And the fact that
> > you missed the point is embodied in your own response: "...a creative
> > experience AS WELL AS learning something." I have always hoped that in my
> > classroom these are not two different experiences. Of course, as a teacher, I
> > offer problems to solve and directions to take. But so do my students. What do
> > your tests measure in this regard that their work fails to demonstrate? Why
> > do you make the requirement that your students design problems the way a
> > professional artist does? Why is that the goal? My students pose questions,
> > design problems, take their work in a direction thats meaningful to them, the
> > way THEY do it. They're not "professional artists" (whatever that means in
> > regard to designing problems to solve...do only "professionals" design
> > meaningful problems?). They're students, who, in my experience, are frequently
> > working independently, posing questions, finding answers...it's just that
> > often they are posing questions that are different then mine, finding answers
> > that are different than mine and (here's the part that can seem so
> > "threatening") working independently of me! I think thats a good thing but how
> > do your tests measure it?
> >
> > Fred
> > Chicago
> >
> > ------------------------------
> >
> > Date: Sat, 21 Nov 1998 22:16:10 -0700
> > From: "Sheryl Ann McCoy" <smccoy>
> > Subject: Re: Art tests
> >
> > Fred:
> > One paragraph does not an answer make. A philosophy of art shared across space and time cannot be explained so briefly. Hang with us for the long haul.
> > When I was in high school, my Spanish teacher, would often go off on a tirade towards us when he would talk about the Europeans who conquered the Americas as "your people". Some of us were not European. I always believed that type of talk was a degrading way to speak to any other human being. I hope it was not your intent to degrade Maggie for supporting Sandra. ie, "your test", etc.
> >
> > Often teaching can be activity based with little clear cut agenda for structural break points by which we teach children a coherent body of knowledge. Inquiry is to be greatly admired, but inquiry without coherence can lead children in a circle from which they never truly emerge.
> >
> > Please go gently through the night. If you allow children to inquire, let yourself inquire. Ask people what they mean, please don't assume you know. We all want to help children learn, and we usually discover that we have fewer differences than we first expected.
> >
> > Best regards in ArtED,
> > Sheryl A. McCoy
> > - ---
> > "Nature uses only the longest threads to weave her
> > patterns, so that each small piece of her fabric
> > reveals the organization of the entire tapestry."
> > - -Richard Feynman
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > Join 18 million Eudora users by signing up for a free Eudora Web-Mail account at http://www.eudoramail.com
> >
> > ------------------------------
> >
> > Date: Sun, 22 Nov 1998 08:07:37 -0600
> > From: "Lauretta A. Hendricks-Backus" <lhb.edu>
> > Subject: Industrial Arts
> >
> > Our district is starting a program in Industrial Arts. None of the
> > existing teachers have a strong background in it. If there is anyone out
> > there who has advise or a direction to go in could you give me some advise?
> >
> > Retta
> >
> > ------------------------------
> >
> > Date: Sun, 22 Nov 1998 10:15:26 EST
> > From: Lynnzi
> > Subject: (no subject)
> >
> > I am looking for information from anybody on building a clay lamp that will be
> > functional. Has anybody ever hand built a lamp maybe with a cylinder as its
> > base or a bowl shape at the base and a cylinder at top about 12 to 15 inches
> > high. The lamp hardware will go through the center of the clay to support the
> > light fixture. Has anybody done this ?
> > Help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1
> >
> > ------------------------------
> >
> > Date: Sun, 22 Nov 1998 10:42:26 -0500
> > From: kprs <KPRS>
> > Subject: Re: Industrial Arts
> >
> > Just like art teachers fighting for their own 'lives' in a school district, so
> > are industrial arts teachers. I recommend strongly that you do not ENABLE your
> > district in anyway to start an Industrial Arts Department. INSIST THEY GET AN
> > INDUSTRIAL ARTS TEACHER. How would you like it if they decided to start an art
> > department without an art teacher?
> >
> > San D
> >
> > Lauretta A. Hendricks-Backus wrote:
> >
> > > Our district is starting a program in Industrial Arts. None of the
> > > existing teachers have a strong background in it. If there is anyone out
> > > there who has advise or a direction to go in could you give me some advise?
> > >
> > > Retta
> >
> > ------------------------------
> >
> > Date: Sun, 22 Nov 1998 11:50:11 -0500
> > From: "menichino" <menichino>
> > Subject: Re: beauty and motion
> >
> > And ...
> > fields of tall grass or grain waving in the breeze;
> > those huge flocks of birds that fly around together, creating undulating
> > shapes and endless movements in the sky....
> > how I've wished that could be captured somehow -- like the scent of pine
> > needles put into an airtight container...
> > Liz in rural NY
> >
> > - ----------
> > > From: DRLanders
> > > To: artsednet.edu
> > > Subject: Re: beauty and motion
> > > Date: Saturday, November 21, 1998 8:27 PM
> > >
> > > I agree,
> > > Other motion that we think are beautiful:
> > > The waves meeting the shore, Leaves rustling in the wind, Shooting stars.
> >
> > ------------------------------
> >
> > Date: Sun, 22 Nov 1998 10:40:32 -0700
> > From: "Sheryl Ann McCoy" <smccoy>
> > Subject: You can handle them all!
> >
> > Greetings Artednetters:
> >
> > I just received my Blue Web'n weekly update of highly rated education related websites, and I wanted to share. Haven't had a chance to look at it myself, but it sounds good!
> >
> > ;-)Sheryl
> >
> >
> > You Can Handle Them All
> > http://www.disciplinehelp.com/
> > This site shares a step-by-step approach to handling misbehavior at home and in school. An overview examines the causes of misbehavior, the core needs that motivate humans, and a four-step discipline model. A behavior index applies the model to over 100 specific misbehaviors.
> > Grade Level: Adult/Professional
> > Content Area: Education (Teaching and Learning), Community Interest(Parenting/Families) [Dewey #370]
> > Application type: Resource, Reference/Tool
> >
> > - ---
> > "Nature uses only the longest threads to weave her
> > patterns, so that each small piece of her fabric
> > reveals the organization of the entire tapestry."
> > - -Richard Feynman
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > Join 18 million Eudora users by signing up for a free Eudora Web-Mail account at http://www.eudoramail.com
> >
> > ------------------------------
> >
> > Date: Sun, 22 Nov 1998 13:47:09 EST
> > From: EVasso
> > Subject: (no subject)
> >
> > Dear Sheryl,
> >
> > You wrote:
> >
> >
> > <<Fred:
> > One paragraph does not an answer make. A philosophy of art shared across
> > space and time cannot be explained so briefly. Hang with us for the long
> > haul.
> > When I was in high school, my Spanish teacher, would often go off on a tirade
> > towards us when he would talk about the Europeans who conquered the Americas
> > as "your people". Some of us were not European. I always believed that type
> > of talk was a degrading way to speak to any other human being. I hope it was
> > not your intent to degrade Maggie for supporting Sandra. ie, "your test", etc.
> >
> > Often teaching can be activity based with little clear cut agenda for
> > structural break points by which we teach children a coherent body of
> > knowledge. Inquiry is to be greatly admired, but inquiry without coherence
> > can lead children in a circle from which they never truly emerge.
> >
> > Please go gently through the night. If you allow children to inquire, let
> > yourself inquire. Ask people what they mean, please don't assume you know.
> > We all want to help children learn, and we usually discover that we have fewer
> > differences than we first expected.
> >
> > Best regards in ArtED,
> > Sheryl A. McCoy>>
> >
> >
> > If you felt somethow degraded by why I wrote, what other response could I make
> > but to apologize. But I ask the particpants of the list to go back (if they
> > are interested) to the earlier posts and check the context. I don't see how I
> > was offensive, but I am always willing to listen...
> >
> > But, Sheryl. You start your post by asking me to "hang WITH US (my emphasis)
> > for the long haul." But when I say "your tests," you claim I am degrading
> > Sandra. I am at a loss.
> >
> > As to your point about "coherent inquiry." Did I argue for incoherent
> > inquiry? I simply tried to point out that the call for testing, in the
> > traditional way we view testing, viewed the act of making art as somehow
> > alienated from the act of learning "something." If we see learning as
> > embodied in the act of changed behavior, then it is precisely in the making of
> > art, in "wonderful creative experience," as the original post described it,
> > that we can see what the student has learned. Paper and pencil tests can
> > evaluate some of this, but not nearly as well. But, this view represents only
> > my experience and my understanding of teaching and learning. Clearly your
> > experience is different.
> >
> > Fred,
> > Chicago
> >
> > ------------------------------
> >
> > Date: Sun, 22 Nov 1998 13:04:32 +0000
> > From: smuelder.US (L.Muelder)
> > Subject: beauty - destruction of; esp. religious
> >
> > When I explained to my students about the frequency of pharoahs destroying
> > either their predecessors art, or their cartouches on the art, they were
> > appropriately horrified, and immediately commented on the unfairness of
> > such actions. (They are quick, in general, to spot and object to
> > unfairness.) I would like to incorporate some "values education" the next
> > time something like this comes up, beyond simply saying that it is immoral
> > to destroy other peoples' art, whether you object to the religious values
> > it displays - or you simply think it's ugly (or obscene). I would like to
> > lead them to see that people like Cromwell and Strom Thurman need to be
> > resisted, without simply saying so. Any suggestions?
> >
> >
> > **********
> > L. Muelder
> > Churchill Junior High School
> > smuelder.US
> >
> > ------------------------------
> >
> > Date: Sun, 22 Nov 1998 11:21:22 PST
> > From: "Sharon Hause" <smhause>
> > Subject: Langer
> >
> > I am teaching high school and middle school art full time as I am
> > working on my masters in Studio Curriculum. For my graduate art seminar
> > course we are reading "Feelings and Form" by Suzanne Langer. Although
> > its a difficult read she poses many interesting ideas on art and
> > artists. I am curious to hear from other people who had read Langer and
> > how it influenced their thoughts.
> >
> > Secondly I need to choose a topic for Research in Art Education an
> > independent course, again for my masters program. Looking for ideas,
> > topics, suggestions....
> >
> > Sharon
> >
> > ______________________________________________________
> > Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
> >
> > ------------------------------
> >
> > Date: Sun, 22 Nov 1998 14:58:39 -0500
> > From: "Litesal" <Litesal>
> > Subject: Re: beauty and motion
> >
> > - -----Original Message-----
> > From: menichino <menichino>
> > To: DRLanders <DRLanders>; artsednet.edu
> > <artsednet.edu>
> > Date: Sunday, November 22, 1998 11:53 AM
> > Subject: Re: beauty and motion
> >
> >
> > These beautiful descriptions of motion remind me of the frightening
> > windstorm we had some nights ago. The moon was bright, lighting the sky in
> > an orangy haze....the silhouettes of the tall, sparse evergreens were waving
> > wildly, they appeared to be dancing to a frantic beat. It was quite
> > exciting!
> >
> > Sincerely, Leah
> >
> > >And ...
> > >fields of tall grass or grain waving in the breeze;
> > >those huge flocks of birds that fly around together, creating undulating
> > >shapes and endless movements in the sky....
> > >how I've wished that could be captured somehow -- like the scent of pine
> > >needles put into an airtight container...
> > >Liz in rural NY
> > >
> > >----------
> > >> From: DRLanders
> > >> To: artsednet.edu
> > >> Subject: Re: beauty and motion
> > >> Date: Saturday, November 21, 1998 8:27 PM
> > >>
> > >> I agree,
> > >> Other motion that we think are beautiful:
> > >> The waves meeting the shore, Leaves rustling in the wind, Shooting stars.
> >
> > ------------------------------
> >
> > End of artsednet-digest V2 #1082
> > ********************************
> >
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> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of artsednet-digest V2 #1085
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