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Lesson Plans


Re: Teachers are reluctanct to change?

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
kprs (KPRS)
Sun, 29 Nov 1998 08:12:36 -0500


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> 1) what's your response to the different positions that researchers and
> art teachers seem to take?

As with all research, the researchers depend on numbers, and not necessarily on
practical aspects of the study. I will agree that one of the nasty side effects of
teaching is that we, after many years of motivating students to a direction we are
familiar with, tend to stick with what works for us...(go figure, eh?)

> 2) what motivates you to use ArtsEdNet, and how does this work or not
> work for you?

ArtsEdNet is a lifeliine for those of us in a profession that are fighting an
ongoing battle from budget cuts, to other faculty who (having achieved an
'academic' attitude) feel what we do is mere 'fun and games' with no merit
whatsoever. Since schools only have 1 to 3 art professionals in their buildings, we
are virtually isolated, and on good days wonder if what we do is reaching anyone.
After being asked for the umpteenth time to have your students enter the local
fireman's poster contest, or being asked to letter signs for parents back to school
night, you begin to doubt what matters and what doesn't. ArtsEdNet is there to
help with those lonely down times, and quite frankly, there to boost your ego when
someone asks for a lesson plan, and you pass yours on to a colleague in cyberspace,
and they write back thanking you. (When was the last time your principal thanked
you for an original idea?)

> 3) Any personal stories of your learning/struggling process while using
> computers in your art teaching

I am "computer comfortable", but find myself in a public school with banks of
computers designed for a combination of word processing and internet use. There is
NO LAB available for the ARTIST, although I have suggested one. I would like a
bank of computers (at least 10) designated for the "visual intellect", with
software for the art students as well as for those architecture/engineering
students in other classrooms.

As for the 'computer' becoming a strong medium, "I don't think so"....nothing will
EVER replace the artists sensual connection with paint and canvas, pencil and
paper, watercolor and pushing the paint on paper, clay and hands...etc etc etc...I
just don't get that from computers, as yet.......to me they are still in the
'glorified' etch-o-sketch realm. And then there's always the problem of the
viewer......and when you actually print out that which you have produced.....can we
say "limited size, limited color, limited, limited, limited"????

Graphic designers, film makers, commercial artists, and to some extend architects,
have benefited from the technology...not only does the computer allow them to think
quicker, it also allows for great final products......BUT, there is more to art
than that, there is that ability to be 'one' with the materials both as a producer
of art and as an owner of art....put an acrylic painting (no matter how good or
bad), next to a printout of a painting, and I will be able to tell you which one is
breathing.

The long and the short of it is this....public schools can not make the committment
to the proper software and machines necessary to go beyond the basics, and if they
could, art teachers would still be stuck with last year's goods (due to the bidding
process, etc.). So I have decided on committing my students to learning how to
produce art with meaning, using a variety of technqiues, learning design
principles, aesthetics, and art history. I let them know that I am not teaching in
an "arts high" and that funding is limited, and that when they go on to art school,
they will be exposed to many more art techniques, from glass blowing, to computers,
and that I am giving them a foundation to be able to move from one to the other.

That's all this 'reluctant educator' can do.

San D

> All of the above are highly welcome. Thanks!
>
>

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        1) what's your response to the different positions that researchers and
art teachers seem to take?

As with all research, the researchers depend on numbers, and not necessarily on practical aspects of the study.  I will agree that one of the nasty side effects of teaching is that we, after many years of motivating students to a direction we are familiar with, tend to stick with what works for us...(go figure, eh?)

        2) what motivates you to use ArtsEdNet, and how does this work or not
work for you?

ArtsEdNet is a lifeliine for those of us in a profession that are fighting an ongoing battle from budget cuts, to other faculty who (having achieved an 'academic' attitude) feel what we do is mere 'fun and games' with no merit whatsoever. Since schools only have 1 to 3 art professionals in their buildings, we are virtually isolated, and on good days wonder if what we do is reaching anyone.  After being asked for the umpteenth time to have your students enter the local fireman's poster contest, or being asked to letter signs for parents back to school night, you begin to doubt what matters and what doesn't.  ArtsEdNet is there to help with those lonely down times, and quite frankly, there to boost your ego when someone asks for a lesson plan, and you pass yours on to a colleague in cyberspace, and they write back thanking you.  (When was the last time your principal thanked you for an original idea?)

        3) Any personal stories of your learning/struggling process while using
computers in your art teaching

I am "computer comfortable", but find myself in a public school with banks of computers designed for a combination of word processing and internet use.  There is NO LAB available for the ARTIST, although I have suggested one.  I would like a bank of computers (at least 10) designated for the "visual intellect", with software for the art students as well as for those architecture/engineering students in other classrooms.

As for the 'computer' becoming a strong medium, "I don't think so"....nothing will EVER replace the artists sensual connection with paint and canvas, pencil and paper, watercolor and pushing the paint on paper, clay and hands...etc etc etc...I just don't get that from computers, as yet.......to me they are still in the 'glorified' etch-o-sketch realm. And then there's always the problem of the viewer......and when you actually print out that which you have produced.....can we say "limited size, limited color, limited, limited, limited"????

Graphic designers, film makers, commercial artists, and to some extend architects, have benefited from the technology...not only does the computer allow them to think quicker, it also allows for great final products......BUT, there is more to art than that, there is that ability to be 'one' with the materials both as a producer of art and as an owner of art....put an acrylic painting (no matter how good or bad), next to a printout of a painting, and I will be able to tell you which one is breathing.

The long and the short of it is this....public schools can not make the committment to the proper software and machines necessary to go beyond the basics, and if they could, art teachers would still be stuck with last year's goods (due to the bidding process, etc.).  So I have decided on committing my students to learning how to produce art with meaning, using a variety of technqiues, learning design principles, aesthetics, and art history. I let them know that I am not teaching in an "arts high" and that funding is limited, and that when they go on to art school, they will be exposed to many more art techniques, from glass blowing, to computers, and that I am giving them a foundation to be able to move from one to the other.

That's all this 'reluctant educator' can do.

San D

         All of the above are highly welcome. Thanks!
 
 

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