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Lesson Plans


Re: art tests

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Michelle H. Harrell (mmhar)
Tue, 17 Nov 1998 20:48:27 PST


In response to Yolanda Brown's question about an art test, Joseph
Augusta wrote:

"You mean like the old US Art School Home Study Course (or something
like that) ads such as: "If you can draw this face, you too can be an
artist?" And then present a simple cartoonish profile for them to copy
and grade them on how well they can do it?
Forgive me, but an art test in this day and age seems a bit retro.
Help the individual's spirit and the mind to evolve--the training of the
hand, though unnecesary in producing meaningful art, will emerge in time
and can then be developed."

Actually, I'm working on a research paper on how art teachers use
assessment in the classroom. I have found that many states are
considering a standardized form of assessment- whether a formalized test
or a pencil and paper task like Joseph humorously descibed above.
It may be something many of us will have to deal with in the future.

The National Assessment of Educational Progress
(http://nces.ed.gov.NAEP) has created performance tasks for students to
demonstrate knowledge in many different media- printaking, clay,
drawing, etc. and reflect on their own work.

For now, I think each teacher needs to come up with whatever form of
testing or assessment works for them. I like the pre-instruction
drawings at the beginning of the semester like from Betty Edward's
Drawing from the Right Side of the Brain. We time them for 5-10
minutes. 1st their hand, a portrait, and then a landscape. Later we
compare them to drawings they've done after they have been in the class
for a couple of months. The kids always seem surprised.

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