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Lesson Plans


ID:UA Art & Ecology, Aesthetic questioning strategy

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Gina C Tafoya (gct)
Fri, 6 Nov 1998 15:21:28 -0700 (MST)


My art & ecology group is working on creating an effective aesthetic
questioning strategy for beginning/intermediate high school students (see
previous posting from ID:UA gct).We hope to lead the
students into thought provoking inquiry on issues of recycling and art. We
would love any feedback from the listserv. Are our questions age
appropriate? Are they sequenced well? Is there an obvious missing link?
Thank-you, Gina.
The piece that is being discussed is the headdress by master
costume maker Jose Ignacio Criollo from Ecuador. This piece is used by
Indian and mestizo dancers in annual processions during the Catholic feast
day of Corpus Christi. It can be seen at the Art & Eco site at http://www.
artsednet.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/resources/Ecology/index.html in the
ecological galleries.
Questioning Strategy #1
Why do people wear what they wear?
Why do you think the people high up in the Andean mountains of
Central Ecuador wear these headdresses?
What materials were used to make this headdress?
The term appropriation describes the activity in which one
cultural group re-defines the use or meaning of an object to meet its own
needs and desires. How do these headdresses appropriate items from the
industrial world?
Does it change the headdresses to use recycled material to make
them instead of the traditional precious stones, metals and shells? If so,
how?

Questioning Strategy #2: Functional art

Hat. Bonnet. Football helmet. Headdress. All of these are articles
of clothing. Can clothes be art? What would make them art?
Is the headdress in the picture art? Why?
Did Jose Criollo intend to make art when he made this? Why/why
not?
If the headdress comes off of the dancer's head during a
particularly exciting part of the dance and it becomes damaged, is it
still valuable as art? Why/why not?
What is the difference between a painting of sunflowers by Van
Gogh and the Headdress by Criollo? Are there similarities?