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Lesson Plans


Re: artsednet-digest V2 #438

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Lindsay J Crelman (lcrelman)
Wed, 5 Nov 1997 16:19:05 -0700 (MST)

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On Fri, 31 Oct 1997, artsednet-digest wrote:

>
> artsednet-digest Friday, October 31 1997 Volume 02 : Number 438
>
>
>
> This edition includes :
> Native American project
> Wall Painting
> query
> Re: art therapy
> Re: query
> Re: artist as teacher vs. teacher
> a&e "Witness for Nature"
> Stained Glass Workshop
> Re: Native American project
> A&E: Endangered Species
> Re: halloween
> Re: artist as teacher vs. teacher
> Re: artist as teacher vs. teacher
> Re: artist as teacher vs. teacher
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 30 Oct 1997 20:34:18 -0500
> From: "The Baldwins" <dgbaldwin>
> Subject: Native American project
>
> A former student of mine who is studying to be an elementary teacher is in
> need of an idea for an art project that deals with Native Americans.
> She'll will be working with 4th and 5th graders for an hour max.
>
> Any ideas?
>
> Thanks, Sally
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 30 Oct 1997 19:24:40 -0800
> From: Judith Auslander <judith>
> Subject: Wall Painting
>
> Got this off of Storytell - thought you guys might enjoy it. Judith
>
> There was this world famous painter. In the prime of her career,
> she started losing her eyesight. Fearful that she might lose her
> life as a painter, she went to see the best eye surgeon in the
> world. After several weeks of delicate surgery and therapy, her
> eyesight was restored. The painter was so grateful that she
> decided to show her gratitude by repainting the doctor's office.
> Part
> of her work included painting a gigantic eye on one wall.
> When she had finished her work, she held a press conference to
> unveil
> her latest work of art: the doctor's office. During the press
> conference, one reporter noticed the eye on the wall, and
> asked the doctor, "What was your first reaction upon seeing your
> newly
>
> painted office, especially that large eye on the wall?"
> To this, the eye doctor responded, "I said to myself 'Thank God I'm
>
> not a gynecologist or proctologist.'
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 30 Oct 1997 11:22:45
> From: wendy sauls <wsauls>
> Subject: query
>
> hi!
>
> does anyone know of a book or net site or some reference/compilation of
> religous/spiritual architecture? i'm looking for something that includes
> structures from throughout history, from many cultures and locales, not
> just euro-religions. thanks!
>
> :D wendy :D
>
> Wendy Sauls
> Art Teacher, Kanapaha Middle School, Gainesville, FL
> Doctoral Student, Art Education, Florida State University - special
> interest in aesthetics
> wsauls
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 30 Oct 1997 09:32:50 -0800
> From: bryan <rekcets>
> Subject: Re: art therapy
>
> sara oneill wrote:
> >
> > Hi Chad,
> > My name is Sara and I am a senior at SUNY New Paltz, in New York. I read
> > your brief message from you and Jennifer and noticed you work with an
> > autistic child. I too, work with people with mental retardation or autism.
> > What really caught my eye though was your interest in Art Therapy. I am very
> > interested in this kind of field and perhaps might go to Grad school for
> > that after I receive my teaching degree. Not many people have heard of it,
> > if you have any info about where a good school for art therapy is or any
> > info at all please let me know. Thanks. Hope to hear from you soon.
> > -Sara
>
> Sara:
>
> There are many schools that offer graduate programs in Art Therapy.
> Living in New York state you most likely have a local chapter of the
> national art therapy association. They can be a big help. I believe
> Columbia University had the first program in Art Therpy. Margaret
> Naumberg started it in the sixties or seventies. Pratt Institute had one
> years ago and Leslie College in Boston has one. There are many, many
> more. The only area of the United States that seems to be light in
> schools and positions is the Northwest (where I live).
> Be sure to look into job posibilities in the state you would like to
> live in. I recently dropped out of a graduate program in Art Therapy
> because the job possibilities were very poor in Oregon, and I don't want
> to move. It is a facinating area of study. Good Luck!
>
> Anne Stecker
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 30 Oct 1997 21:11:53 -0800
> From: Judith Auslander <judith>
> Subject: Re: query
>
> Check out Baha'i arcitecture, especially the temple in India. Judith
>
> wendy sauls wrote:
>
> > hi!
> >
> > does anyone know of a book or net site or some reference/compilation
> > of
> > religous/spiritual architecture? i'm looking for something that
> > includes
> > structures from throughout history, from many cultures and locales,
> > not
> > just euro-religions. thanks!
> >
> > :D wendy :D
> >
> > Wendy Sauls
> > Art Teacher, Kanapaha Middle School, Gainesville, FL
> > Doctoral Student, Art Education, Florida State University - special
> > interest in aesthetics
> > wsauls
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 30 Oct 1997 23:58:07 -0600
> From: Sandra Poos <klpoos>
> Subject: Re: artist as teacher vs. teacher
>
> Michelle Vidro,
> Please don't give up on these kids. They NEED you!!! I FEEL for you
> right now. I kinda know what you are going through. I teach a Basic Ed
> class and the homeroom teacher sounds like the one you are dealing with,
> they ARE control freaks, can't let go. She ALWAYS stays in my room for
> art with the aid, and rarely lets them express themselves. One little
> girl was in tears last week, aa the teacher drew the witch on paper with
> black paint. She wanted to draw her OWN witch with black paint.
> I talked to the principal, and I have the class to myself. Maybe YOU
> should talk to the principal about what is going on in the classroom. It
> does make a difference.
> It sounds like you are TRYING to give these first graders a great
> education in art, if only the homeroom teacher wasn't there!!! She needs
> to take a break away from the class while you are teaching the kids art.
> Ask the principal if this would be alright with her/him. Usually, they
> are understanding if you tell them what is going on.
> This teacher wants to stifle the kids, and soon they won't want to
> express themselves. She needs to be out of the classroom when you are
> teaching art to the kids.
> Alot of the OLD teachers think Art is not as important as the other
> subjects, so.. they sometimes cut out Art time, take a child out of my
> class to take a test they missed,etc. I always tell them, this class is
> as importatnt as a Math class, and no they can't miss Art to take a
> test.
> It sounds like you are really TRYING to teach this first grade class
> art and not Halloween busy-work.
> Yes you did come up with a good idea of having the teacher pose for the
> class. At least she won't be bothering you for a while.
> Don't EVER be scared to go in and talk to a teacher. We are only human,
> and do make mistakes.
> PLEASE, don't let this one teacher get you down. I feel sorry for the
> kids , as they have to put up with this teacher every day.
> I think it is GREAT that you son drew his own lion instead of using a
> template. They should be able to take the tiles home to finish their
> project. This teacher IS a control freak. I always let the kids take
> home materials, to finish their project. I do mosaics in 6th grade as it
> is a tedious project. Maybe you should have done an easier project with
> 1st grade, that didn't take so... long.
> I also do portraits with first grade, and we draw the principal of the
> school. We also do clay slab plaques, where the kids make a self
> portrait.
> Hang in there Michelle, and talk to the principal. Its great that you
> are volunteering your time, so the kids can have a quality art time.
> Sandy Poos
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 08:22:40 CST6CDT
> From: "Kathrine Walker" <klwalk>
> Subject: a&e "Witness for Nature"
>
> Picked up from the Museum-ed listserve....
>
> On the Web at www.rachelcarson.org/witness.html - with reviews,
> contents, author bio and appearances, buy the book
>
>
> We are pleased to announce the release of "Rachel Carson: Witness for
> Nature" (Henry Holt and Company), by Linda Lear, the long-awaited
> biography of the courageous ecologist and nature writer whose book
> "Silent Spring" began a movement that transformed the way we
> understand ourselves and the living world.
>
> "The splendid, definitive biography we have been waiting for."-
> Stewart L. Udall, former Secretary of the Interior
>
> By drawing on previously unavailable sources and on interviews with
> those who knew her, Linda Lear gives a compelling portrait of
> Carson's connection with nature and of her determination to save what
> she loved.
>
> "...The definitive biography of one of the most important Americans
> of
> the twentieth century."- Edward O. Wilson
>
> Linda Lear is a native of Glenshaw, Pennsylvania and grew up not far
> from Rachel Carson's childhood homestead. Lear is currently Research
> Professor of Environmental History at George Washington University
> and a research collaborator in the Office of Smithsonian Institution
> Archives. Lear served as a historical consultant for the PBS
> documentary "Rachel Carson's Silent Spring."
>
> "The more time passes, the larger Rachel Carson looms...This book
> could not come at a better time...Would that we had someone of her
> stature to turn the tide, to remind us of how precious and how
> vulnerable the threatened world really is."- Bill McKibben
>
> The Rachel Carson Homestead is Rachel Carson's birthplace and
> childhood home, where her early years nurtured a love and respect for
> nature that would guide her for the rest of her life. The Rachel
> Carson Homestead Association preserves, restores, and interprets her
> Springdale birthplace; offers education programs which advance her
> environmental ethic; and serves as an international resource for
> information about her life and work.
>
> "Rachel Carson: Witness for Nature" is available directly from the
> Rachel Carson Homestead Association. All proceeds will be used to
> support our preservation efforts and education programs.
>
>
>
> Kathrine Walker, Education Coordinator
> Beach Museum of Art, Kansas State University
> klwalk
> www.ksu.edu/bma
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 08:23:59 CST6CDT
> From: "Kathrine Walker" <klwalk>
> Subject: Stained Glass Workshop
>
> - ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> Date: Thu, 30 Oct 1997 15:00:25 -0500
> From: Martha Jackson <mjackson.NC.US>
> Reply-To: Museum discussion list <MUSEUM-L.COM>
> To: MUSEUM-L.COM
> Newsgroups: bit.listserv.museum-l
> Subject: Stained Glass Workshop
>
> The Jekyll Island Museum is presenting a Stained Glass Workshop, January
> 23-25, 1998 at The Jekyll Island National Historic District, Jekyll
> Island, GA. The 3-day seminar, designed primarily for the stained glass
> layperson, will include professional advice and discussion of stewardship
> issues for organizations that are responsible for stained or leaded glass.
> Topics include: What is stained glass?
> How to clean and protect
> How to assess condition
> What is restoration of stained glass?
> How to find competent contractors
> A demonstration of glass restoration
> Tips for stewardship effectiveness
> Seminar will also include:
> Sepcific analysis of Tiffany and Armstrong stained glass
> Conversational access to two of the pre-eminent stained
> glass experts in America (Arthur Femenella & Neal
> Vogel)
>
> Workshop registration fees are $300 & are due by Dec. 15; after Dec. 15,
> registration fees are $350. Participation is limited to the first 45
> registrants. A minimum registration of 25 will be required.
>
> Registration includes two continental breakfasts and two box lunches.
>
> Special room rates are available at the Jekyll Island Clarion Beachfront
> Resort at $39 per night plus tax.
>
> This workshop is co-sponsored by the Southeastern Museums Conference.
>
> For additional information, contact the Jekyll Island Museum, 375
> Riverview Drive, Jekyll Island, GA 31527; (912) 635-2119.
>
>
>
> Martha Battle Jackson, Registrar (919) 733-7862
> NC Historic Sites Fax: (919) 733-9515
> 109 East Jones Street mjackson.nc.us
> Raleigh, NC 27601-2807
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Opinions expressed in this message may not represent the policy of my agency.
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> "Don't part with your illusions. When they are gone, you may still
> exist, but you have ceased to live."--Mark Twain
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
> Kathrine Walker, Education Coordinator
> Beach Museum of Art, Kansas State University
> klwalk
> www.ksu.edu/bma
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 06:29:50 -0700
> From: ggoose (Michelle Vidro)
> Subject: Re: Native American project
>
> Sally,
> How about showing some cave paintings, and then doing your own. I did this
> with first graders and it was a big success.
>
> Cave painting:
>
> 1. Cut up some brown grocery bags into large sheets,like 12"x12" or whatever.
>
> 2. Have kids crumble them up really tight, then uncrumble them. This is
> their cave wall.
>
> 3. Put some white paint in a spray bottle. They can put their hand down on
> the paper and spray, leaving handprint as negative shape. (An object can be
> used instead of hand.) Explain how they used to put paint in their mouths
> to spray.
>
> 4. Then using brushes and a limited palette (explain that making colors was
> very time consuming because they had to gather flowers and such to grind
> into pigment) have them paint "symbols" of our time. Refer to the symbols
> that they painted, as in animals before a hunt, etc.
>
> That's it! Good luck!
> Michelle
>
>
> >A former student of mine who is studying to be an elementary teacher is in
> >need of an idea for an art project that deals with Native Americans.
> >She'll will be working with 4th and 5th graders for an hour max.
> >
> >Any ideas?
> >
> >Thanks, Sally
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 11:04:00 +0000
> From: Mary Sheridan <sheridan.23>
> Subject: A&E: Endangered Species
>
> Sara,
>
> A few years ago the Columbus Museum of Art invited classes to discuss
> and the life and art of Elijah Pierce, a well-known Columbus folk
> artist, and to look closely at his carving entitled NOAH'S ARK.
>
> Students were asked to think about the idea of an ark as a container
> that holds important things and keeps them safe and to design as "ark"
> filled with objects that they think are important to save.
>
> Classes discussed ideas and wrote a statement of intent regarding what
> and why they hoped to preserve and then created their version of "ark".
>
> The results were very diverse and presented some thoughtful solutions.
>
> Mary Sheridan
> sheridan.23
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 11:51:23 -0500 (EST)
> From: Laurann65
> Subject: Re: halloween
>
> I know it is too late for this year, but I made witches with my 1st
> graders...
>
> 9x12 orange paper for back ground
> 9x6 light green paper, cut into oval for head
> 4.5x6 black paper, cut into tall triangle for hat
> 1x9 black paper strip for rim of hat
> black crayon to draw eyes, large nose with a hairy wart and mouth
> piece of newspaper to cut into thin strips for hair
> glue it together.... ta da!
>
> It was great practice for cutting shapes and gluing, and they looked really
> cute. I don't usually do projects where they are this similar to eachother,
> but for the younger grades these witches still looked unique when they were
> finished, and they weren't pumpkins!
>
> :) Laura Allan
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 09:08:37 -0700
> From: ggoose (Michelle Vidro)
> Subject: Re: artist as teacher vs. teacher
>
> Hi Barb,
> Well, it's good to know i'm not alone. And I guess it's good that the kids
> have people like us around in those situations to try to do some damage
> control.
>
> You just made me realize, she isn't putting up any of our artwork!? But her
> silly Halloween busy work sure is up and nicely displayed. grrrrrrrr!!!!!
>
> I am getting a lot of good feeback from the parents, and the principal
> wants me to attend the School Site Council meeting to present my program
> and try to get some money for it. Again, too bad the teacher has to be
> there.
>
> I need to find a way to make this work for me....and the kids, and the
> teacher too. I will be so sad if it doesn't work out.
>
> Thanks so much for your support.
> Regards, Michelle
>
>
> >Michelle
> >It's Barb, the one who sent you the curriculum this summer. I just read
> >your story. I had a similar experience several years ago. I was
> >volunteering one day a week to a small catholic school near my home (for
> >credit towards certification), in addition to working 2 days at the
> >school where I still teach. The school I volunteered at had teachers
> >very much like yours, some worse. At the end of the year I was out of
> >there. I was lucky that I did not have a child there. I am so sorry that
> >you have to work with someone like that. It can be very frustrating. You
> >must just keep doing art and displaying everything...and you will start
> >to be noticed by everyone in the school. She will hear so many
> >compliments she is bound to lighten up sooner or later. Hope things get
> >better.
> >Barb James
> >Louisville, KY
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 09:08:26 -0700
> From: ggoose (Michelle Vidro)
> Subject: Re: artist as teacher vs. teacher
>
> Dear Jai,
> Thanks so much for your support. It's good to know i'm not alone. That's
> amazing about the yoga choice.....but I guess there are benefits from doing
> yoga too.
>
> It's encouraging to hear how things have worked out for you. I don't know
> what i'm going to do yet, but I really want to figure out a way to make
> this work out. Not only do I love doing this, but if I had to stop, the
> children would be the ones to lose out, and after all, they are what this
> is all about.
>
> Regards, Michelle
>
>
> >Dear Michelle,
> >
> >I wrote to you earlier, but I feel I should tell you that I experienced the
> >exact same thing in my daughter's first grade, and I came to the teacher as
> >a credentialled art teacher.(I felt compelled to teach art because that
> >year, for some inexplicable reason, the art teacher decided to teach yoga
> >instead of art!). Unfortunately, the first grade teacher and I never came
> >to terms, about art or much else. The good news is that I have done
> >incredible volunteer projects with ensuing second, third, fourth and
> >(second kid) Kindergarten classes. So don't give up - your ideas and
> >instincts are great. Oddly enough my second kid's first grade teacher is
> >not very welcoming - perhaps it is inherent in the species. And yes,
> >teachers can be very controlling - we all like to be lords of our
> >classrooms.
> >
> >I wish I could show you a tile and ceramic mosaic I did with the
> >Kindergarteners.The kids made ceramic flowers, with leaves and stems and
> >grass, and the parents helped me create a 4' x 8' tiled mosaic
> >"Kinder-garden" for the playground wall. The best! Once I did that, they
> >ALL wanted me to be a parent in their classrooms.
> >
> >Hang in there, and fight for your right to do art!
> >
> >Jai W.
> >Berkeley.Ca
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 09:08:53 -0700
> From: ggoose (Michelle Vidro)
> Subject: Re: artist as teacher vs. teacher
>
> Sandy,
> * please see bullets......thanks! :o)
>
> >Michelle Vidro,
> > Please don't give up on these kids. They NEED you!!! I FEEL for you
> >right now. I kinda know what you are going through. I teach a Basic Ed
> >class and the homeroom teacher sounds like the one you are dealing with,
> >they ARE control freaks, can't let go. She ALWAYS stays in my room for
> >art with the aid, and rarely lets them express themselves. One little
> >girl was in tears last week, aa the teacher drew the witch on paper with
> >black paint. She wanted to draw her OWN witch with black paint.
>
> * Of course she did! That sounds awful. Glad i'm not alone though. Maybe
> it's a good thing we are there to do "damage control"!
>
> > I talked to the principal, and I have the class to myself. Maybe YOU
> >should talk to the principal about what is going on in the classroom. It
> >does make a difference.
>
> * I am considering talking to the principal, but i'm afraid that if I make
> waves the teacher will take it out on my son. *sigh*
>
>
> > It sounds like you are TRYING to give these first graders a great
> >education in art, if only the homeroom teacher wasn't there!!! She needs
> >to take a break away from the class while you are teaching the kids art.
> >Ask the principal if this would be alright with her/him. Usually, they
> >are understanding if you tell them what is going on.
> > This teacher wants to stifle the kids, and soon they won't want to
> >express themselves. She needs to be out of the classroom when you are
> >teaching art to the kids.
>
> * I'd love it if she wasn't there. But now, I think she would take it
> personally, since we had this happen yesterday.
>
> > Alot of the OLD teachers think Art is not as important as the other
> >subjects, so.. they sometimes cut out Art time, take a child out of my
> >class to take a test they missed,etc. I always tell them, this class is
> >as importatnt as a Math class, and no they can't miss Art to take a
> >test.
>
> * I think this teacher is pretty old fashioned. In all fairness she
> actually is good as far as teaching them the 3R's. My son is learning a lot
> from her. I guess his lessons include something about the different kinds
> of people there are in the world and how to deal with them. Maybe i'm still
> learning that too.
>
> > It sounds like you are really TRYING to teach this first grade class
> >art and not Halloween busy-work.
> > Yes you did come up with a good idea of having the teacher pose for the
> >class. At least she won't be bothering you for a while.
> > Don't EVER be scared to go in and talk to a teacher. We are only human,
> >and do make mistakes.
> > PLEASE, don't let this one teacher get you down. I feel sorry for the
> >kids , as they have to put up with this teacher every day.
> > I think it is GREAT that you son drew his own lion instead of using a
> >template. They should be able to take the tiles home to finish their
> >project. This teacher IS a control freak. I always let the kids take
> >home materials, to finish their project. I do mosaics in 6th grade as it
> >is a tedious project. Maybe you should have done an easier project with
> >1st grade, that didn't take so... long.
> > I also do portraits with first grade, and we draw the principal of the
> >school. We also do clay slab plaques, where the kids make a self
> >portrait.
> > Hang in there Michelle, and talk to the principal. Its great that you
> >are volunteering your time, so the kids can have a quality art time.
> > Sandy Poos
>
> * Thanks for your support. It means a great deal to me.
> Regards, Michelle
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of artsednet-digest V2 #438
> *******************************
>
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