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Lesson Plans


Re: artists and art education bias (long)

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EVasso
Tue, 5 Nov 1996 17:37:09 -0500

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Dale,

Here is where we get to the meat of the matter. The problems of teacher
training and education, (art education and otherwise) is a complicated
matter, not to be solved by what course one takes, or how many courses one
takes. It is the answer to the question: What makes a good teacher (art or
otherwise)? A beginning to the answer to this question can be found in your
response:

< I tend to assume that if you received your art ed degree and
<certificate all in a bachelors program, and you are now extremely
<knowledgeable about art and teaching methods, that you have likely
<done a lot of work and learning on your own since getting your
<initial degree. This is the impression I get from the people on this
<group. Most of you all sound as though you are on a neverending road
<of learning and discovery. I hope that you represent the majority of
<teachers in that regard. I would just prefer the system do more to
<make certain that is the case.

But, how Dale, do you create a system that makes certain that it produces
teachers who look at their lives as a "neverending road of learning and
discovery?" Do you require a course, an area of research, a paper, a
disertation?

No program can guarantee this. So how is it done?

-Fred


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