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Re:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: November 25, 2008

---------

mmoore_at_TeacherArtExchange
Date: Wed Nov 26 2008 - 03:49:17 PST


Re: Plaster strips for mold making

I use either a piece of plastic wrap, with a hole cut for the nose for breathing, then the wrap placed over the entire face. Or a piece of kleenex works just as well. No need for gloppy vaseline or anything. The plastic or kleenex is enough of a barrier for the plaster strips. My students work in pairs, one being the plasterer and the other receiving the plaster. Takes about 20 minutes, with a hair dryer a little less time. Then they just wiggle their face, and the mask pops off. It does take at least 24 hours to fully dry and then you can add to it, repair, etc. with more plaster gauze. Great stuff.

Mindy in Halifax, NS, Canada

----- Original Message -----
From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Date: Wednesday, November 26, 2008 4:00 am
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: November 25, 2008

> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Tuesday, November 25, 2008.
>
> 1. RE: teacherartexchange digest: November 20, 2008
> 2. plaster strips for mold making
> 3. Re: plaster strips for mold making
> 4. Re: plaster strips for mold making
> 5. Re: plaster strips for mold making
> 6. Re: plaster strips for mold making
> 7. Re: plaster strips for mold making
> 8. art trip to India
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
>
> Subject: RE: teacherartexchange digest: November 20, 2008
> From: "Sherry Syrie" <ssyrie@cheneysd.org>
> Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2008 11:26:32 -0800
> X-Message-Number: 1
>
> Paulette-Here at Cheney Middle School, a new Performance Assessment
> Testalong with state art requirements at the high school level (1
> year of
> art now, soon to be 2 years) have mandated that we include reading and
> writing into our class requirements. I think it's GREAT! It makes me
> feel like my class can be about SO MUCH MORE than just "doing fun
> stuff"as you put it. And, it has earned us "Art Teachers" a bit
> more respect
> from other teachers of reading and writing. First, at the
> beginning of
> each quarter I make sure the kids understand and are aware that all
> artwork has a story behind it. We talk about some of the more famous
> pieces the kids know a little about and what "stories" they have.
> Thenwe talk about how knowing the story or background of a piece
> makes it
> more meaningful and memorable. That is a nice intro. for the writing
> piece I require that accompanies most art projects we complete. A few
> examples of writing in my class are; "I AM ARTWORK" where the kids
> speakin the 1st person (as the art project) and write a narrative
> aboutthemselves, how they were created, who created them (the
> student) etc.
> Also, we do a "WHISTLE CREATURE BIOGRAPHY" where after making a
> ceramicwhistle creature the kids write a biography, written in the
> 3rd person,
> about the creature's personality traits, likes, dislikes, significance
> of his/her whistle etc. As I display student art work these writing
> pieces accompany them and serve to give the kids more practice at
> writing (which as teachers we ALL are responsible for) and serve to
> maketheir own projects more interesting and meaningful to people
> appreciating their artwork in the case. As far as reading goes, I
> alsohave a thing called, "Friday Favorites" where on Fridays I
> share my
> favorite artwork, book illustrations, internet artwork/photographs
> thatpeople have sent to me etc. I tend to lean more toward sharing
> the book
> illustrations because the kids ask for that more often (even middle
> school kids LOVE to be read to). So, first I talk about why I love
> thebook so much and why it's my "Friday favorite" pick. Then I
> read the
> book to the kids and we talk about the story/message and the artwork
> that was used in the illustrations. We get pretty serious about
> exploring the artist's techniques and have a lively group discussion
> about it which usually leads to a few students doing their own
> independent research to find out more and answer some questions
> that we
> were left with about how/why etc. It's a great way to come
> together as
> a class and to TALK about artwork too.
> I hope this helps--Keep up the good fight! Sherry Syrie
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
> [mailto:teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu]
> Sent: Friday, November 21, 2008 12:01 AM
> To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
> Subject: teacherartexchange digest: November 20, 2008
>
> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Thursday, November 20, 2008.
>
> 1. Re: Elementary Art Assessment
> 2. RE: Elementary Art Assessment
> 3. Kindergarten Text
> 4. text for 6th graders?
> 5. Re: text for 6th graders?
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
>
> Subject: Re: Elementary Art Assessment
> From: "Cathy Gaul" <allgaul@comcast.net>
> Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2008 07:15:08 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 1
>
> Hi all,
> Harper, you describe the same situation as we here in Cherry Hill NJ
> will be
> approaching in the next few years. We did the alignment with the NJ
> standards this summer just so we looked legal if the State came to
> the
> schools to check, but we have nothing cohesive between schools let
> alone
> across the curriculum. Any info on meaningful assessment would be
> wonderful.
> Our current elementary assessment is the same language and same 5
> different
> areas as all the other special subjects and it seems like they were
> created
> by the PE department-mostly behavior-based and work ethic skills.
> I am sure many others would be interested in this part of our
> teaching
> paperwork!
>
> Cathy
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
>
> Subject: RE: Elementary Art Assessment
> From: "Sears, Ellen" <ELLEN.SEARS@Anchorage.kyschools.us>
> Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2008 09:59:54 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 2
>
> This is on our progress reports for primary -
>
> P-for progressing, WP -for progressing with assistance, and N- for
> eachsub- heading.
> sub headings are:
> -Exhibits creativity and craftsmanship
> -Responds to and analyzes works of art
> -Produces art that demonstrates understanding of elements and
> principlesof design
> -Uses art materials and resources appropriately
> -Completes assigned projects
> -Learning behaviors/social skills
>
> I can't say that I like them, or really use them - they are little
> kids- everyone is a 'P'...
> But maybe it is a starting point -add or delete.
>
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
>
> Subject: Kindergarten Text
> From: "Kulas Family" <makul9@gra.midco.net>
> Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2008 17:24:23 -0600
> X-Message-Number: 3
>
> Any suggestions regarding Kindergarten textbooks (looking for a Big
> Bookoption)? I received a grant to purchase a Kindergarten text for
> a small
> school in which the kindergarten teacher will collaborate with me
> (Gr.1-6
> art teacher) but I need to provide a basic resource for her.. I have
> looked
> at the Davis text (which seems very good) but not any of the other
> publishers.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Mary in MN
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
>
> Subject: text for 6th graders?
> From: paulette keck <paulettekeck@hotmail.com>
> Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2008 03:18:07 +0000
> X-Message-Number: 4
>
>
> Hi all,
>
> I've been having some serious issues with classroom
> management lately and have decided to implement a more rigid routine
> for a couple weeks to see if I can remind them that art is still a
> class even though you do fun stuff in it. I am looking for something
> the kids (6th graders) can read for 5 minutes or so at the
> beginning of
> class and then answer questions on. It can be just about anything,
> likeshort bios of notable artists, or art periods or something like
> that.Even if its something I can break into parts for several days.
>
> Of course, there's a catch... the reading levels range from 8th grade
> all
> the way down to 1st. In fact, most are probably around 4th grade
> level,so I'm really looking for a range of resources.
>
> Do any of you have a period of time dedicated to reading and
> writing?
> And if so, how does that impact your curriculum? Your classroom
> management?
> the kids' interest?
>
> Thanks so much.
>
> Paulette
> Bronx Studio School for Writers and Artists
> NYC Public Schools
> _________________________________________________________________
> Proud to be a PC? Show the world. Download the Im a PC Messenger
> themepack now.
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> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
>
> Subject: Re: text for 6th graders?
> From: Jenna Kang <jkang@srvusd.net>
> Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2008 20:10:57 -0800
> X-Message-Number: 5
>
>
> I have a daily warm up for my 7th and 8th graders for the first five
> minutes. I rotate between theme based drawing and art appreciation. In
> the
> week of art appreciation, students "read" an image through PowerPoint
> and
> answer five questions such as identify the elements of art, what
> moods,feelings are communicated, explain your liking or disliking
> of the work,
> etc. I like this time because it prepares their attitude and gives me
> time
> to do attendance.
>
> The classroom climate chart I invented (in my mind I did) has been
> working
> wonderfully especially with my 6th graders. I move the arrow up and
> downaccording to their behaviors. The highest privilege they can
> get on the
> last
> week of their wheel is extra 3 points and two days of free sitting!
>
> :)
> Jenna
> San Ramon, CA
>
>
>
> On 11/20/08 7:18 PM, "paulette keck" <paulettekeck@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> >
> > Hi all,
> >
> > I've been having some serious issues with classroom
> > management lately and have decided to implement a more rigid routine
> > for a couple weeks to see if I can remind them that art is still a
> > class even though you do fun stuff in it. I am looking for something
> > the kids (6th graders) can read for 5 minutes or so at the beginning
> of
> > class and then answer questions on. It can be just about anything,
> like
> > short bios of notable artists, or art periods or something like
> that.> Even if its something I can break into parts for several days.
> >
> > Of course, there's a catch... the reading levels range from 8th
> gradeall
> > the way down to 1st. In fact, most are probably around 4th grade
> level,
> > so I'm really looking for a range of resources.
> >
> > Do any of you have a period of time dedicated to reading and
> writing?> And if so, how does that impact your curriculum? Your
> classroommanagement?
> > the kids' interest?
> >
> > Thanks so much.
> >
> > Paulette
> > Bronx Studio School for Writers and Artists
> > NYC Public Schools
> > _________________________________________________________________
> > Proud to be a PC? Show the world. Download the 3I9m a PC2 Messenger
> themepack
> > now.
> > hthttp://clk.atdmt.com/MRT/go/119642558/direct/01/
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
>
>
> ---
>
> END OF DIGEST
>
> ---
> ssyrie@cheneysd.org
> leave-587403-
> 317167.368d5ae9c9e98b1f8b325dba41b3639c@lists.pub.getty.edu
>
> This message has been scanned for malware by Websense.
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> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
>
> Subject: plaster strips for mold making
> From: Michelle Molnar <mmolnar1@msn.com>
> Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2008 13:09:11 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 2
>
>
> Hello,
>
> Has anyone done a project where you casted students' hands or faces
> using plaster wrap? If so, did you have any issues with it
> getting too hot or with anyone being allergic? Did you just use
> vaseline as a release agent?
>
> Thanks!
> _________________________________________________________________
> Get more done, have more fun, and stay more connected with Windows
> Mobile..
> http://clk.atdmt.com/MRT/go/119642556/direct/01/
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
>
> Subject: Re: plaster strips for mold making
> From: "Sidnie Miller" <SMILLER@elko.k12.nv.us>
> Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2008 12:45:11 -0800
> X-Message-Number: 3
>
> I used to do it all the time with middle schoolers. We worked in
> pairs,spread newspaper then cut the plaster strips and arranged
> them all
> around the water bowl with each piece single stacked and not touching
> another so they won't get wet while you are working. The person to be
> plastered then put on a garbage bag with a hole in the top, and we
> tapedthe hole shut around his neck. We put a tight bandana on
> them, covering
> all of their hair and going mid way down their forehead. Then they
> greased up with vasaline and the partner carefully put on the
> strips.
> Lots of water with plaster drips down their bodies, so we turned up
> theedges of the plastic bag, and then put another garbage bag
> across their
> lap. The plaster doesn't come out of their clothing. When the masks
> harden up 20 min or so, have them remove their own and be sure to
> placethem face up or they'll crush the noses. They still need to dry
> overnight. You can reinforce the next day. Make sure you have a
> marker or something to put their names on the masks. There are
> always a
> few who freak out and open their eyes, and a couple that get a
> rash. I
> think the vasaline helps with that.
>
> >>> Michelle Molnar <mmolnar1@msn.com> 11/25/2008 12:09 pm >>>
>
> Hello,
>
> Has anyone done a project where you casted students' hands or faces
> using plaster wrap? If so, did you have any issues with it getting
> too hot or with anyone being allergic? Did you just use vaseline
> as a
> release agent?
>
> Thanks!
> _________________________________________________________________
> Get more done, have more fun, and stay more connected with Windows
> MobileB..
> http://clk.atdmt.com/MRT/go/119642556/direct/01/
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
>
>
> -*Scanned by ECSD GWAVA*-
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
>
> Subject: Re: plaster strips for mold making
> From: Ken Schwab <bicyclken@sbcglobal.net>
> Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2008 13:55:28 -0800 (PST)
> X-Message-Number: 4
>
> It has very little heat and vasoline was the release agent
> especially on hairy arms and eye brows, eye lashes etc.
>
> Ken Schwab
> San Jose, CA
>
>
> --- On Tue, 11/25/08, Michelle Molnar <mmolnar1@msn.com> wrote:
>
> > From: Michelle Molnar <mmolnar1@msn.com>
> > Subject: [teacherartexchange] plaster strips for mold making
> > To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
> <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>> Date: Tuesday, November
> 25, 2008, 12:09 PM
> > Hello,
> >
> > Has anyone done a project where you casted students'
> > hands or faces using plaster wrap? If so, did you have
> > any issues with it getting too hot or with anyone being
> > allergic? Did you just use vaseline as a release agent?
> >
> > Thanks!
> > _________________________________________________________________
> > Get more done, have more fun, and stay more connected with
> > Windows Mobile..
> > http://clk.atdmt.com/MRT/go/119642556/direct/01/
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
>
> Subject: Re: plaster strips for mold making
> From: "narnot" <narnot@hope-elem.org>
> Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2008 17:00:00 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 5
>
> I have used plaster gauze on my own face (with a partner) at a
> teacher workshop. Be cautious of getting it in eyes. It will burn
> because of the lime in plaster.
>
> Another alternative...I've used (with students, Gr. 6) the product,
> Friendly Plastic pellets.(not the strips) It is a water soluble
> plastic that you put in hot water so the plastic becomes malable.
> Kind of like a lump of clay. When it becomes cool enough to place
> on skin you spread it over the face like a warm compress. It does
> not take long for it to start hardening to lift off the face. It
> forms very easy. You can then paint with acrylics and hot glue any
> decorations. Neater and easier than plaster gauze.
>
> Nancy (from New Jersey)
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Sent via the WebMail system at mail.hope-elem.org
>
>
>
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
>
> Subject: Re: plaster strips for mold making
> From: GDEVLIN123@aol.com
> Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2008 18:04:19 EST
> X-Message-Number: 6
>
> The first time I used plaster on a High School girl we followed the
> usual
> grease, bandana routine and it seemed to go well until after the
> removal. The
> girl neglected to tell me she was claustrophobic and started
> hyperventilating. I
> had to get her to the nurse to breathe in a bag. Then when I looked
> inside her
> mask the eyes were perfectly rimmed with eyelashes. I thought I
> would start
> hyperventilating. On closer inspection I realized it was perfect
> imprints from
> her mascara. I've learned to ask about fears and phobias before
> plastering
> anyone. It is fun and the kids love. Good luck.
> **************One site has it all. Your email accounts, your social
> networks,
> and the things you love. Try the new AOL.com
> today!(http://pr.atwola.com/promoclk/100000075x1212962939x1200825291/aol?redir=http://www.aol.com/?optin=new-dp
> %26icid=aolcom40vanity%26ncid=emlcntaolcom00000001)
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
>
> Subject: Re: plaster strips for mold making
> From: Sharon <sharon@art-rageous.net>
> Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2008 18:14:11 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 7
>
> I used to use Vaseline but then switched to using plastic wrap. MUCH
> cleaner and probably safer, in terms of allergies.
>
> The most detailed step-by-step account of the process is here (when I
> did mummy masks with my younger kids):
> http://www.art-rageous.net/MummyMask-LP.html
>
> But here are other pages that show masks made by high school students:
>
> http://www.art-rageous.net/Self-ExpressiveMasks.html
>
> http://www.art-rageous.net/Self-ExpressiveMasks-2003.html
>
> I'll be doing the "self-expressive" masks again this winter. It's
> always a fun project and the kids come up with such interesting ideas!
>
> --
> Sharon
> www.art-rageous.net
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
>
> Subject: art trip to India
> From: "gabyleigh@netzero.net" <gabyleigh@netzero.net>
> Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2008 23:15:14 GMT
> X-Message-Number: 8
>
> Hi Evreyone,
>
> I'm an art teacher and I am planning a trip to India this summer. I
> wanted to know if anyone has any tips on workshops or schools that
> would have art programs. I would love to find an Ashram that I can
> live in for a month or so that also has an art focus.
>
> I remember that there was a post from a young woman, a painter who
> was living in India about a year back. I can't find it though.
>
> Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
>
> Thank you so much and have a wonderful holiday,
>
> Gaby Ader
>
>
>
>
> ____________________________________________________________
> Huge assortment of Pillows. Click Here
> http://thirdpartyoffers.netzero.net/TGL2231/fc/PnY6rc1A2UPoPN0SO7t2hvvVS5wjlZQ02edJbtkRelCIGWRkxiDrR/
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>
>
> ---
>
> END OF DIGEST
>
> ---
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