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Re:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: November 02, 2006

---------

From: Lisa Keffer-Ruiz (passion4paint_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Sat Nov 04 2006 - 09:05:06 PST


Re: Sub Plans
From: Lisa Ruiz passion4paint@earthlink.net

Having a sub in the art studio is always a planning issue. I teach 6-8 grade art at a visual and performing arts magnet and even though my students are familiar with the studio procedures there are still problems. They are adolescents after all and they will test the limits. I always lock up all materials when I am going to be out and I leave only the materials they will need for the activity that is planned.

I usually leave a drawing activity because all they will need are the instructions and pencil and paper. I try to make it as easy for the sub to manage as possible. I use several of the drawing activities in the drawing workbook by Betty Edwards, Drawing On the Right Side of the Brain. It's a companion workbook to her book. A favorite activity is the upside drawings. The kids love it and the subs usually sit down and do it with the kids. I get notes from them saying, "I didn't know I could draw like that."

In the workbook there are several contour drawings by famous artists and the instructions are to place the copy of the drawing upside down and draw your own contour. I have found that middle school students cannot leave the drawing upside down. They are too concerned with "getting it right" and they can't stand to have their paper or the drawing they are copying upside down.

Before I make the copies of the drawings for the kids I draw light, horizontal lines at one inch intervals all the way down the sample. I place 4 different drawings inside a 9 x 12 manila envelope. The drawings are numbered 1, 2, 3, 4 (each drawing gets more challenging) and they are upside down. The students slide the drawing out of the envelope one inch at a time, using the horizontal lines as their guide. They draw only the portion of the image that is revealed as they pull the drawing out. They are told to record the lines and the negative shapes that they see as they reveal more and more of the drawing. I tape the envelope to the table so they cannot move it and the instructions are printed on the envelope. I have used this activity for 5 years. I have a file of master contour drawings and I change out the images when I need to use it again.

This lesson in drawing from observation forces the students to turn off the critc in their head and get down to the business of recording what they see. If they cannot see the whole image it's easier for them to do. Once they have acheived success at the activity a few times they are more willing to use this trick on their own and they develope the confidence they need to take risks in the art room. The kids can't wait to show me how close their copy is to the original. They are so pleased with themselves and the sub has a good day in the studio as well.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: a question
>From: Ken Schwab <bicyclken@sbcglobal.net>
>Date: Fri, 3 Nov 2006 07:04:49 -0800 (PST)
>X-Message-Number: 1
>
>I have had a different experience. I show slides of student work and will =
>sometimes (if I have one) put up an example. I try to do the project with =
>them, to demonstrate on and encourage a correct procedure. The students ne=
>ver seem to choose a similar subject, or copy my style, I encourage that in=
>dependence and show examples of student work that goes outside the box but =
>I see that whatever I show them as an example of a response to the art prob=
>lem, is rarely if never, copied.=0A =0AKen Schwab=0ASan Jose, CA
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: sub plans that rock!
>From: <vranck@bellsouth.net>
>Date: Fri, 3 Nov 2006 11:15:21 -0500
>X-Message-Number: 2
>
>Hey everyone,
>I am going in for surgery next week and will be out the whole week. That means, unfortunately, that I will
>have to have a sub....which also means I can't leave clay or paint assignments either because they
>wouldn't know how to help them or run the clean up at the end. So...my question to you all is what are
>some really cool assignments that I could have a sub do that the students would enjoy?
>Thanks in advance to all who respond,
>Vicki in Tennessee
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Re: a question
>From: <rpopek@verizon.net>
>Date: Fri, 03 Nov 2006 10:41:31 -0600 (CST)
>X-Message-Number: 3
>
>I do show student work also as often as I can. I have a television in my room. I put a slide show of previous work on the television. It scrolls through and they can get ideas from that.
>
>Not every class copies the sample but I have had instances of some classes that copy what I have. I think it's a security issue. If the child has not been comfortable doing art the easiest way to make sure you don't do it wrong is to copy the teacher. Sometimes these kids are obsessed with the right and wrong way and it takes some time to get them out of that mentality.
>Renee
>
>
>>From: Ken Schwab <bicyclken@sbcglobal.net>
>>Date: 2006/11/03 Fri AM 09:04:49 CST
>>To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>>Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] a question
>
>>I have had a different experience. I show slides of student work and will sometimes (if I have one) put up an example. I try to do the project with them, to demonstrate on and encourage a correct procedure. The students never seem to choose a similar subject, or copy my style, I encourage that independence and show examples of student work that goes outside the box but I see that whatever I show them as an example of a response to the art problem, is rarely if never, copied.
>>
>>Ken Schwab
>>San Jose, CA
>>
>>---
>>To unsubscribe go to
>>http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: sub plans that rock!
>From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
>Date: Fri, 3 Nov 2006 10:02:42 -0700
>X-Message-Number: 4
>
>Vicki,
> Do you get an art sub ? Can you count on the same sub each day ?
>What level do you teach ? Do you have the students M - F ?
>When I was gone for a day or two, (I taught 6-8 grade and had my
>students all week) I left written worksheets based on reading
>Scholastic Art magazines. I had 25 years of back issues in the
>classroom. Each year I wrote question sheets to follow each
>new issue. They came in very handy if I missed a day or two.
>It's such a great Art History resource as well. This was a great
>resource but I would not use it for a week.
> Subs come with such varied backgrounds. Many don't
>follow procedures well. But my students knew my routine using
>the magazines. I had students assigned to pass out and collect the
>magazines. My students knew to fasten the completed work
>into their art notebooks, etc. So even if the sub did not help
>the class, the work still got done. My classes knew I'd check
>upon return and ask questions about the artist they had read
>about. Check the magazine out at:
>http://teacher.scholastic.com/products/classmags/art.htm
> Woody
>
>On Nov 3, 2006, at 9:15 AM, <vranck@bellsouth.net> =20
><vranck@bellsouth.net> wrote:
>
>> Hey everyone,
>> I am going in for surgery next week and will be out the whole =20
>> week. That means, unfortunately, that I will
>> have to have a sub....which also means I can't leave clay or paint =20
>> assignments either because they
>> wouldn't know how to help them or run the clean up at the end. =20
>> So...my question to you all is what are
>> some really cool assignments that I could have a sub do that the =20
>> students would enjoy?
>> Thanks in advance to all who respond,
>> Vicki in Tennessee
>
>Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
>35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
>in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
>http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
>Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
>Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703
>
>=93The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
>is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
>of your artwork that soars.=94 from: =93Art & Fear=94
>
>Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
>Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Beautiful/Grandkids.html
>My newest watercolors:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Recent.html
>
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: a question
>From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
>Date: Fri, 3 Nov 2006 10:12:30 -0700
>X-Message-Number: 5
>
>
>On Nov 3, 2006, at 9:41 AM, <rpopek@verizon.net> <rpopek@verizon.net> =20=
>
>wrote:
>
>> Sometimes these kids are obsessed with the right and wrong way and =20
>> it takes some time to get them out of that mentality.
>> Renee
>
>Right and wrong answers is the way most of the school is structured. =20
>We have to wage
>a battle against this every day in art. It would make a good =20
>discussion topic as to how
>many art teachers deal with "swimming against the current."
> Woody
>
>Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
>35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
>in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
>http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
>Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
>Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703
>
>=93The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
>is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
>of your artwork that soars.=94 from: =93Art & Fear=94
>
>Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
>Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Beautiful/Grandkids.html
>My newest watercolors:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Recent.html
>
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: sub plans that rock!
>From: Della Buzard <dellasnook@yahoo.com>
>Date: Fri, 3 Nov 2006 09:29:37 -0800 (PST)
>X-Message-Number: 6
>
>I am going to answer this from the subs point of view.
> I am an art sub but sub in other subjects as well, I
>do my absolute best to complete the plans just as
>they were left, so give subs some credit. I can tell
>you what not to leave, I am not sure what grades you
>are teaching but I can tell you if you leave just
>simple coloring sheets that they will be done within
>ten minutes not matter how many times you tell them to
>color neatly and then they are bound to get themselves
>into trouble. I taught a year as well and I left a
>plan that went along with current unit that may have
>been less time consuming but related well with the
>project\unit at the time. If your students are
>prepared then most often they are in control of the
>situation and already know what they are doing and how
>to do it. I hope this little bit of advise helps.
>Della in New York
>
>
>
>
>
>
>__________________________________________________________________________________________
>Check out the New Yahoo! Mail - Fire up a more powerful email and get things done faster.
>(http://advision.webevents.yahoo.com/mailbeta)
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: a question
>From: Marvin Bartel <marvinpb@goshen.edu>
>Date: Fri, 3 Nov 2006 12:29:32 -0500
>X-Message-Number: 7
>
>>I have another topic that might promote some interesting discussion. I teach grade 1-5. My colleague in this building was a graphic artist and later became an art educator. She makes a sample project of each lesson finished as do I. But being a graphic artist or perhaps it?s just the way she is, her samples are always (for lack of a better word,) immaculate. They are neat precise and all in all perfect and beautiful. I admire her discipline and am a bit envious at times. My samples on the other hand are fairly simple and I don?t get too elaborate. My student teacher and I were discussing this difference. I have noticed that should I leave a sample up after presenting the lesson I?d often get 25 carbon copies of my own. So I don?t often finish what I display so that the kids can come to ideas on their own. And I often put the sample away with the younger ones so they have to use their imaginations. . . .
>
>Renee
>
>I did student teaching with two art teachers. Mr. Nelson showed lots of examples, and Mrs. Wolfe taught her students how to generate their own ideas. Both got impressive results and they were both well liked by their high school students. At the time, as a student teacher, I did not even realize how they were so different. I just copied both of their methods so they would give me good recommendations. However, the longer I have been teaching, the more I think the students got the most useful creative and critical thinking skills and life-long-learning ability from Mrs. Wolfe's lessons. She taught them the methods and and gave them practice in generating their own ideas instead of suggesting easy solutions from examples.
>
>I know that showing examples is a very common practice and it works because our brains are wired with an instinct to imitate experts. This is especially true when things are not explained well and we don't know how to do something (see mirror neurons). However, it is not essential to show an example or to do a demonstration to teach a good art lesson. Our brains are also wired and have an instinct to be imaginative. In looking at what the great artists themselves do (and did), they probably look at examples to be sure to do something else (they would not be great artists if they only imitated and copied).
>
>As an artist, I look at other artists artwork to try to figure out how the artist is seeing, feeling, and thinking. I like to speculate on why the artist might have done it. I have no interest in doing another artwork that looks like theirs, but I might be interested in figuring what I would make dealing with a similar thought process. When I was an art student I felt very frustrated when I looked at examples because it felt like all the creative ideas had been taken. However, the longer I work, the easier it is to originate ideas and the more I realize that the surface of creative ideas has barely been scratched.
>
>In art class, if I want to get a new idea across without showing an example or doing a demo, I have found that the introductory time can be used to have them do hands-on practice of an important skill needed to do the assignment. This gives them confidence and gives them some time to think and focus. They are able to start something. If I have them make a list of subject matter ideas as they practice, I find that they have little need or desire for my ideas. If they keep a sketch book of their own ideas and observations, they have a source book. I get the satisfaction that my students are becoming skilled in art and independent in thought.
>
>Marvin Bartel, Ed.D., Professor of Art Emeritus
>Goshen College, 1700 South Main, Goshen IN 46526
>studio phone: 574-533-0171??
>http://www.bartelart.com
>http://www.goshen.edu/art/ed/art-ed-links.html
>"You can't never know how to do it before you never did it before." ... a kindergarten boy working with clay for the first time.
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Re: a question
>From: <rpopek@verizon.net>
>Date: Fri, 03 Nov 2006 13:10:56 -0600 (CST)
>X-Message-Number: 8
>
>>
>>I know that showing examples is a very common practice and it works because our brains are wired with an instinct to imitate experts. This is especially true when things are not explained well and we don't know how to do something before."
>
>This is a great point and it reminds me of a time I had with some first graders. I can't remember the exact wording of what I said but what I MEANT was, line your art work up against the wall on the floor so it can dry. Being good little first graders they did exactly what they were told. I looked and 25 elmers glue bottles were lined neatly up against the wall drying very nicely.
>
> I don't always explain things well, sometimes think I am and then have to say wait let me rephrase that :-) or more often than not let "me show you" it works the other way too because often I have to say to a student "can you show me?"
>
>Renee
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Artist Trading Cards/Blogs
>From: "Pam Stephens" <pgstephens@npgcable.com>
>Date: Fri, 3 Nov 2006 13:01:41 -0700
>X-Message-Number: 9
>
>Students in my Foundations of Art Education course are creating Artist
>Trading Cards. These are being posted to the class blog at
>http://are200-421.blogspot.com/ if you would like to see them.
>
>We'll have more posted next week.
>
>You'll have no problem sorting the students who are dedicated to
>figuring out a way to incorporate this activity into a more meaningful
>context from those who quickly whipped something together. Regardless
>of quality, the ATCs are being posted for all to see.
>
>You'll also note on the blog that all students will be commenting upon
>the ATCs.
>
>As an aside, this is the first semester that I have used a Blog as a
>part of the course content. It has proven to be an invaluable tool in
>many ways. Not only does it encourage use of technology by engaging
>students in the actual use of a Blog, it also provides insights into
>the understanding of those students who do not talk in class.
>
>If you have a moment to scan the entire blog, you might enjoy the
>responses to the Quiz or some of the links that have been posted and
>discussed.
>
>On the blog you will see a list of student names. By clicking on those
>links you will find student journals. Some are exceptional records.
>
>Blogs will be a definite part of future coursework for my classes.
>
>From Arizona,
>Pam
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: sub plans that rock!
>From: wendy free <wendypaigefree@yahoo.com>
>Date: Fri, 3 Nov 2006 13:35:01 -0800 (PST)
>X-Message-Number: 10
>
>Sorry if you said this already, Vicki, but which
>grades do you teach?
>
>:D Wendy
>
>--- vranck@bellsouth.net wrote:
>
>> Hey everyone,
>> I am going in for surgery next week and will be out
>> the whole week. That means, unfortunately, that I
>> will
>> have to have a sub....which also means I can't leave
>> clay or paint assignments either because they
>> wouldn't know how to help them or run the clean up
>> at the end. So...my question to you all is what are
>> some really cool assignments that I could have a sub
>> do that the students would enjoy?
>> Thanks in advance to all who respond,
>> Vicki in Tennessee
>>
>>
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go to
>>
>http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: a question
>From: Ken Schwab <bicyclken@sbcglobal.net>
>Date: Fri, 3 Nov 2006 16:03:17 -0800 (PST)
>X-Message-Number: 11
>
>The idea that the student can be creative without demonstrations is a fine =
>idea and it may work with more advanced students. However, if a student is=
> starting out and you are trying to teach skills, procedures, or how to mas=
>ter observational drawing without knowing what to look for, it can be very =
>frustrating. I feel that a student becomes very creative when they are kno=
>wledgeable about basic skills like gradations of value, how light hits an o=
>bject and how to achieve textures, then let them loose in creating drawings=
>.=0A =0AThe student can be creative and not be able to see that creativity =
>materialize with out a good foundation. I demonstrate the tools needed, sk=
>ills to be used and procedures for a task. They come up with the solutions=
> to the problem but they are able to create because they know how to use th=
>e materials, tools and follow the steps that it will take to see that creat=
>ive thought materialize.=0A =0AKen Schwab=0ASan Jose, CA =0A=0A=0A----- Ori=
>ginal Message ----=0AFrom: Marvin Bartel <marvinpb@goshen.edu>=0ATo: Teache=
>rArtExchange Discussion Group <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>=0ASe=
>nt: Friday, November 3, 2006 9:29:32 AM=0ASubject: Re: [teacherartexchange]=
> a question=0A=0A=0A>I have another topic that might promote some interesti=
>ng discussion. I teach grade 1-5. My colleague in this building was a graph=
>ic artist and later became an art educator. She makes a sample project of e=
>ach lesson finished as do I. But being a graphic artist or perhaps it?s jus=
>t the way she is, her samples are always (for lack of a better word,) immac=
>ulate. They are neat precise and all in all perfect and beautiful. I admire=
> her discipline and am a bit envious at times. My samples on the other han=
>d are fairly simple and I don?t get too elaborate. My student teacher and I=
> were discussing this difference. I have noticed that should I leave a sam=
>ple up after presenting the lesson I?d often get 25 carbon copies of my own=
>. So I don?t often finish what I display so that the kids can come to ideas=
> on their own. And I often put the sample away with the younger ones so the=
>y have to use their imaginations. . . .=0A=0ARenee=0A=0AI did student teach=
>ing with two art teachers. Mr. Nelson showed lots of examples, and Mrs. Wo=
>lfe taught her students how to generate their own ideas. Both got impress=
>ive results and they were both well liked by their high school students. A=
>t the time, as a student teacher, I did not even realize how they were so d=
>ifferent. I just copied both of their methods so they would give me good r=
>ecommendations. However, the longer I have been teaching, the more I think=
> the students got the most useful creative and critical thinking skills and=
> life-long-learning ability from Mrs. Wolfe's lessons. She taught them the=
> methods and and gave them practice in generating their own ideas instead o=
>f suggesting easy solutions from examples.=0A=0AI know that showing example=
>s is a very common practice and it works because our brains are wired with =
>an instinct to imitate experts. This is especially true when things are no=
>t explained well and we don't know how to do something (see mirror neurons)=
>. However, it is not essential to show an example or to do a demonstration=
> to teach a good art lesson. Our brains are also wired and have an instinc=
>t to be imaginative. In looking at what the great artists themselves do (a=
>nd did), they probably look at examples to be sure to do something else (th=
>ey would not be great artists if they only imitated and copied).=0A=0AAs an=
> artist, I look at other artists artwork to try to figure out how the artis=
>t is seeing, feeling, and thinking. I like to speculate on why the artist =
>might have done it. I have no interest in doing another artwork that looks=
> like theirs, but I might be interested in figuring what I would make deali=
>ng with a similar thought process. When I was an art student I felt very f=
>rustrated when I looked at examples because it felt like all the creative i=
>deas had been taken. However, the longer I work, the easier it is to origi=
>nate ideas and the more I realize that the surface of creative ideas has ba=
>rely been scratched.=0A=0AIn art class, if I want to get a new idea across =
>without showing an example or doing a demo, I have found that the introduct=
>ory time can be used to have them do hands-on practice of an important skil=
>l needed to do the assignment. This gives them confidence and gives them s=
>ome time to think and focus. They are able to start something. If I have =
>them make a list of subject matter ideas as they practice, I find that they=
> have little need or desire for my ideas. If they keep a sketch book of th=
>eir own ideas and observations, they have a source book. I get the satisfa=
>ction that my students are becoming skilled in art and independent in thoug=
>ht.=0A=0AMarvin Bartel, Ed.D., Professor of Art Emeritus=0AGoshen College, =
>1700 South Main, Goshen IN 46526=0Astudio phone: 574-533-0171??=0Ahttp://ww=
>w.bartelart.com=0Ahttp://www.goshen.edu/art/ed/art-ed-links.html=0A"You can=
>'t never know how to do it before you never did it before." ... a kinderga=
>rten boy working with clay for the first time.=0A=0A---=0ATo unsubscribe go=
> to =0Ahttp://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: successful fundraiser
>From: "Chantal Pinnow" <cpinnow@yisseoul.org>
>Date: Sat, 4 Nov 2006 21:34:46 -0800
>X-Message-Number: 12
>
>Our school had our annual "Fun Fest" last night. This year the Art Club set
>up some tables and were able to raise a lot of money. We spent about $50 for
>supplies and raised over $500. We had three stations. The first was face
>painting. They charged $1.00 for a small cheek or hand painting and $3.00
>for a large design or full face painting. We also had some jewelry we sold
>(it was donated), so that was pure profit (we didn't even sale all of it-
>most of our money came from the other two stations). The last station was
>very successful. We bought some white self-drying clay and made tons of
>crosses and hearts and other fun shapes out of it. At this station, we let
>the kids select and paint their own clay piece. We had put a hole in the
>piece and added some string to make it a necklace. The kids loved it. We
>charged $2.00 for one piece and $3.00 for two pieces. We sold almost
>everything we made (even some of the samples at the end of the night.)
>Anyway, I thought I would pass along the idea. It would work well for
>Christmas ornaments too if you had to do a fundraiser around Christmas.
>Chantal
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Re: a question
>From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
>Date: Fri, 3 Nov 2006 21:54:22 -0600
>X-Message-Number: 13
>
>I had to laugh at this story - it SO reminded me of one of my kinders last
>year. We drew cats and I told them that after they were finished coloring
>their cats they were to color the background. One of my "spacier" kinders
>was happily coloring a blank paper and I asked him what he was doing. He
>replied he was coloring his background, and he flipped his paper over to
>prove the cat was on the "back". I loved it! He was doing EXACTLY what I
>asked, only in a way I never would have thought of. :-)
>~Michal
>K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
>http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
>
>
>>>I know that showing examples is a very common practice and it works
>>>because our brains are wired with an instinct to imitate experts. This is
>>>especially true when things are not explained well and we don't know how
>>>to do something before."
>>
>> This is a great point and it reminds me of a time I had with some first
>> graders. I can't remember the exact wording of what I said but what I
>> MEANT was, line your art work up against the wall on the floor so it can
>> dry. Being good little first graders they did exactly what they were told.
>> I looked and 25 elmers glue bottles were lined neatly up against the wall
>> drying very nicely.
>>
>> I don't always explain things well, sometimes think I am and then have to
>> say wait let me rephrase that :-) or more often than not let "me show you"
>> it works the other way too because often I have to say to a student "can
>> you show me?"
>
>
>
>
>
>---
>
>END OF DIGEST
>
>---

---
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