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Re: [teacherartexchange] Clay Animation Questions

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From: Kristina (mhamster_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Wed Nov 30 2005 - 10:46:31 PST


Could you please keep this onlist for all of us.

Here are bunch of a posts from a mac user group...we were discussing
computer programs and the many mac experts had much to share. The
conversation actually begins at the bottom and this first is the final
contribution.

If I have overstepped my length of post allotted, I apologize but wish to be
kept in the "loop" of clay animation talk... so I offer all that I have from
the OLD mac side of the problem

Kristina

``````````````````````````
I haven't been following this topic very well, but I myself make animations
and I use OS 9 all the time. They are not clay animations (made with LEGO
actually) but its all the same. These are a few programs for the classic OS
that should work well for what you need:

Framed: a program that will let you take the still pictures from your
digital camera and put them together into a movie file. Works pretty well
for me. Its also free. http://www.likelysoft.com/framed/

FrameThief: this is a frame capturing program that will allow you to capture
frames from a webcam, digital camcorder, or digital still camera. A single
user license for it is only $40, but they also have an education single user
price of $35. http://www.framethief.com/

BTV and BTV Pro: another frame capturing program. BTV allows you to capture
frames, while BTV Pro has an actual stop motion feature. I have not used any
of these personally so I do not have much experience with it.
http://www.bensoftware.com/index.html

Loud Inc: they make two stop motion programs. One of which is their normal
version and one which is made specifically for kids. Some of the pages on
their website are corrupted, so I have not been able to try them out. I know
that the regular version (StopMotion Studio) has a $45 registration fee. I
do not know if the kids version does or how much it is.

StopMotioner: this program from Mein Software is still in the beta steps I
believe. I also have not tried it out but it looks promising.
http://www.miensoftware.com/stopmotioner.html

That is about all of the software I can think of for now. Hope this helps.

PS: if you would like to see some of the stop motion animations that are
made with LEGO go here: http://www.brickfilms.com . Its a community full of
people like myself that make stop motion animations with LEGO. Check it out.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> If a digital still camera is used, then I suppose the easiest way
> to turn a bunch of pictures into a movie is perhaps the great
> GraphicConverter. Using its Convert&Modify command one can do it in
> a snap, while also, if needed, applying all sorts of modifications
> to the images.
> It can also run from at least System 7 up until 10.4.3. And, best
> of all, it may already be there in your Mac (it has come bundled
> with several macs for years); if not, then the shareware fee is
> quite reasonable.

There's an old, old classic app that took a bunch of stills and
strung them into a movie. I remember I got it when I was messing with
POV-ray for the mac. This was a long time ago. and I can't remember
it, though I may have a copy squirreled away on an old backup at home.

Also, Quicktime Pro will take sequentially numbered still images and
convert them to a .mov file. (and if you have access to the old Mac
Addict disks you can still score a copy of QT 3 player, which lets
you do it without needing the pro series.)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

> Laurent has an excellent point... using iMovie with a digital picture
> in OS 9 (and in OS X for that matter) will produce 5 second clips of
> the still. It's about 149 frames too much stuff, but you can split
> the clip and delete the extra 4:29 (sec:frames) to get a single
> frame. Of course, doing this 300 times for a 10 second movie would
> get a bit tedious... ;)
>
> I did this summer before last with some second and third graders and
> it went great.

If a digital still camera is used, then I suppose the easiest way to
turn a bunch of pictures into a movie is perhaps the great
GraphicConverter. Using its Convert&Modify command one can do it in a
snap, while also, if needed, applying all sorts of modifications to
the images.
  It can also run from at least System 7 up until 10.4.3. And, best
of all, it may already be there in your Mac (it has come bundled with
several macs for years); if not, then the shareware fee is quite
reasonable.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

> I was just about to ask this question... to do clay animation what is the
> lowend cheapo mac machine of choice...something the guys over on Swap list
> might have in thier lonely used mac room . I have a wee budget for this
> 28 student (jrs & srs) art class Commercial Art 1 & 2.

Well, isn't clay animation some kind of stop-motion movie or capture? If so,
you could just use a digital camera to capture the stills you take and then
import them to your Mac. Most digital camera uses USB so you will be good
with a Lombard or a Beige G3. Then, I'm pretty sure that there are shareware
programs that will take a folder of digital still pictures and turn them
into a QuickTime movie. I think that would be the cheapest if I understand
what clay animation is.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

> ratz... my G3 Beige is only 277MHz
> so how did they do clay animation in the...uh old G3 days?
> Kristina

If you can connect the video source to your mac, consider BTV Pro. It
can run in any old G3, and can do frame grabbing (with "onion skin",
so you can compare with you previous frame), as well as video,
besides a lot more (time lapse capture, quicktime editing, etc).

~~~~~~~~~~~

>>>>> does iMovie run in OS9x?
>>>> The older iMovie Version 2 does run under OS 9.x, but it requires
>>>> native FireWire, which your Lombard does not have.
>>> ratz... my G3 Beige is only 277MHz
>
> One more try...
> would this gizmo work with either my Lombard, G3 Beige or 6100 with
> a G3 upgrade...all on OS9x
>
> http://www.synchrotech.com/product-1394/analog-dv-converter_02.html
>

Not without firewire.

I used an ATI XClaim VR / RAGE Pro video capture card to do various
small tasks on my 6400/G3/9.1 and they worked out OK. Youd have to
do the capture with that, adn the video editing in Adobe Premiere 5.1
or so, which you should be able to find for $10 on ebay.
It has RCA video input which should be perfect for your camcorder
(you were talking non-digital camcorder IIRC, just composite video
out, right?)

I've seen that ATI card go for nothing used in the last few years.
So- you could do it with that, plus some additional software.

HTH.

Or, if you had somewhere to write to for a $450 grant, you could get
a Mac Mini and have a much better experience, but you still might
have to deal with the composite input if you don't have a digital
camcorder somewhere. The ATI Xclaim VR card did work for me.

```````````````````
>>> does iMovie run in OS9x?
>>
>> The older iMovie Version 2 does run under OS 9.x, but it requires
>> native FireWire, which your Lombard does not have.
>
> ratz... my G3 Beige is only 277MHz
>
> so how did they do clay animation in the...uh old G3 days?

Well, there have been video input cards for many years on the Macintosh.
Usually, these cards would have some dedicated chips that would do the
conversion from analog to digital. Back then, you also needed to have a fast
Macintosh because of the amount of information that was captured in real
time. There were also cards for PowerBooks. I still have a CapSure PCMCIA
card that lets you import video into a PowerBook. I tried it a few times
when I got it a few years ago. The quality was average but it was doing the
work. Before iMovie, you would use a software like Adobe Premiere to do the
editing.

````````````````````````````````````````````````
> does iMovie run in OS9x?

The older iMovie Version 2 does run under OS 9.x, but it requires
native FireWire, which your Lombard does not have.

<http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=58740>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

>>> conversation from the art teachers list... claymation very simply with a VHS
>>> video camera?... a digital camera.. My macs are G3 /6100 and running 9x.
>>>
> Usually, to import an analog signal into a Mac, you need what is called a
> "DV-Bridge". This device takes an analog signal like the ones you get from the
> output of a VCR or a non-DV video camera and transforms it into a digital
> video stream. All the DV bridges I've seen so far have a FireWire output that
> you plug into a Mac.
>
does my Lombard have firewire capabilities?

> Since you mention a 6100, I don't know what you could use. The 6100 is pretty
> limited in the expandability section, since it has only a PDS slot. Not sure
> if there was any video card that would have an analog input.
>
ratz

> Dazzle was a company making a DV bridge.
>
> ...I'm pretty sure the software you're talking about was probably meant to be
> used with their DV bridge somehow, which you don't really need on a Macintosh
> running iMovie.
>
does iMovie run in OS9x?

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