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Re:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: November 17, 2005

---------

From: Eileen Cooley (cooleye_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Sat Nov 19 2005 - 06:12:56 PST


Does anyone know of a software program for teaching interior design to
high school students? If user friendly enough I would also like to
offer to my middle school kids? Thank you Eileen

>>> "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest"
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu> 11/19/05 2:01 AM >>>
TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Thursday, November 17, 2005.

1. Re:Lesson Planning Software
2. Re: Lesson Planning Software
3. Re: Lesson Planning Software
4. reconstituting Laguna underglazes
5. Re: Lesson Planning Software
6. RE: What program to use?
7. Re: reconstituting Laguna underglazes
8. Re: Appleworks Presentation to iMovie?
9. Working with iMovie
10. Re: What program to use?
11. Appleworks Presentation to iMovie?
12. RE: November Rose
13. Call for articles
14. Travel to France
15. Re: reconstituting Laguna underglazes

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re:Lesson Planning Software
From: Ann Ayers <art304@bellsouth.net>
Date: Fri, 18 Nov 2005 09:57:35 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

> I did not see space for lists of materials, vocabulary,
> and procedures plus the important evaluation tools most
> districts require. Perhaps the space is there and I didn't
> see it. The basic plans most districts except are next to
> worthless.

The toolkit HAS a space for what I call is "the meat" of the lesson -
elements of art, principles of design, objectives, vocabulary,
materials, procedure, preparation, resources, assessment, reflection
- as well as the things that are required by most districts -
essential question, standards, benchmarks, ESOL/ESE strategies,
technology standards, technology use, software, character traits,
related math and communication testing skills, web resources, etc.
Within the toolkit is a way to make two different types of rubrics
for each of the lessons.
I have spent years tweeking this sofware to include EVERYTHING that
is REQUIRED and EVERYTHING that art educators WANT. It is pretty
comprehensive.
>
> Do you import the state standards and benchmarks or just
> use the nationals ? In your one example (grade 9) it relates
> to mixing purple ? Shouldn't that be in the 2nd grade ?
>
We customize every toolkit to include the appropriate State standards
and benchmarks, and the appropriate grade level that is requested -
the example on the website is just that - a sample. Yes, you teach
color mixing in 2nd grade, but I also teach color mixing in 9th
grade, 10th grade, and so on - you'd be surprised at how many
beginning art students do not remember how to mix secondary colors -
many have not had art since elementary school and they conveniently
"forget" what they learned there. Some may not have even had art
ever (there are some elementary schools that have cut their art
programs to accomodate more "core" subjects and the state testing
assessments. This was just an EXAMPLE.
> Also, the concern about the busy background might be
> handled by lightening it considerably. I do that with the
> backgrounds on my web pages.
> Woody
>
The backgrounds are there at the request of art educators who wanted
"real" visuals on THEIR toolkit - the backgrounds do NOT interfere
with data entry.
Teachers can choose the print the screen where they enter data, or
they can choose from 3 different printing formats that have "light"
backgrounds (mainly black and white). Teachers can also print a
parent handout and a student handout from within the program, as well
as print either of the illustrations that they attach to their
lessons, and print the rubrics as well.

You can reference files on your computer so that when you look at a
lesson plan, you can open up a corresponding handout, etc. without
having to search your harddrive.

The toolkit has a component for creating curriculum maps (some
districts do this), and for storing worksheets, handouts, etc.
Included in the toolkit are 60+ lesson plans which you may use or
delete.

Everyone who purchased the software has been pleased - no complaints
so far!

My principal was so impressed that she asked me to create toolkits
for each curricular area in the school - so now, I have english,
math, social studies, foreign language, business tech, pe, music,
etc. toolkits!

If you have any questions, let me know.
ann

>

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Lesson Planning Software
From: Ann Ayers <art304@bellsouth.net>
Date: Fri, 18 Nov 2005 10:24:21 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

> I love your Toolkit for Art Educators. I do have a question. Is
> there a way to delete the pictures of the paintbrushes in the
> background, or will that be there when you print it?
> Lauren

Lauren,
Teachers can choose the print the screen where they enter data, or
they can choose from 3 different printing formats that have "light"
backgrounds (mainly black and white). Teachers can also print a
parent handout and a student handout from within the program, as well
as print either of the illustrations that they attach to their
lessons, and print the rubrics as well.

If you print the data entry screen, the images will print (in black
and white or color, depending on your printer). Most people choose
to print from the "print center" where you will find the different
printing formats.

hope this answers your question...
ann

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Lesson Planning Software
From: "go4art@juno.com" <go4art@juno.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Nov 2005 16:25:58 GMT
X-Message-Number: 3

As a user, I am highly complementary of the software. I ordered it
afte=
r seeing it used at a presentation at NAEA. It allows you to input
data=
, images and web and document links for your lesson plans with drop in
s=
ections for elements, connections, standards, technology, etc. =

The 2 page format has sections for everything (even if you don't use
all=
 of them for each lesson). You can create rubrics that include images.
=
 =

After information is in place you can generate different handouts for
pa=
rents and students with appropriate info for from the same lesson plan!
=
There is a section for curriculum maps and storage of games, puzzles
and=
 worksheets.

I have had no trouble using it (with the small exception of trying to
sh=
are files with colleagues as I am PC)I love using this well thought
out,=
 user friendly software. Being created by an art educator it definitely
=
had the busy art educator in mind!!

Thanks Ann! Creatively, Linda in Oregon

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: reconstituting Laguna underglazes
From: Chris Lincoln <artloverlincoln@gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Nov 2005 08:35:42 -0800
X-Message-Number: 4

Hi,

I have received a dozen or so jars of Laguna low fire underglazes.=20
Some of them are very dried out. Is it possible to reconstitute them?
 I have never tried it before. Any ideas?

Thanks in advance for any experience you can share.

--
Chris Lincoln
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Lesson Planning Software
From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 18 Nov 2005 09:37:53 -0700
X-Message-Number: 5
Ann,
	Thank you for the very comprehensive reply to
my questions. I will send the information on to art
teachers back in Kansas City. I'm going back there
before the Christmas holiday and will have a chance
to mention your program.
				Woody
Ann Ayers wrote:
> The toolkit HAS a space for what I call is "the meat" of the lesson - 
> We customize every toolkit to include the appropriate State standards 
> The backgrounds are there at the request of art educators who wanted  
> "real" visuals on THEIR toolkit - the backgrounds do NOT interfere 
with 
> data entry.
> Teachers can choose the print the screen where they enter data, or 
they 
> can choose from  3 different printing formats  that have "light"  
> backgrounds (mainly black and white). 
-- 
	Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
		mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
Albuquerque, NM    87199-1703
?The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
of your artwork that soars.?              from: ?Art & Fear?
Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
http://www.taospaint.com/Spring05/Photos.html
Your Invite to Woody's Exhibit:
http://www.taospaint.com/ArtShow/Invite.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: RE: What program to use?
From: <Renee.Berg@k12.sd.us>
Date: Fri, 18 Nov 2005 13:13:57 -0600
X-Message-Number: 6
Michal, I've been doing clay animation for 5 years now with 8th graders
and last year we moved to Windows Movie Maker.=20
-----Original Message-----
From: M. Austin [mailto:whest177@wheatstate.com]=20
Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2005 7:06 PM
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
Subject: [teacherartexchange] What program to use?
I am doing clay animation movies with my middle school students. Some of
them want to have their characters "speak" using their own voices. I
have the microphone, but what program do you use to record their
talking? The microphone came with the computer, so I'm assuming it has
some kind of program, but I can download one as well.
~Michal
K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
http://www.geocities.com/theartkids=20
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To unsubscribe go to
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----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: reconstituting Laguna underglazes
From: "Sidnie Miller" <smiller@elko.k12.nv.us>
Date: Fri, 18 Nov 2005 12:23:57 -0800
X-Message-Number: 7
I'd soak them to reconstitute and then try them out.  Some glazes might
=
not work but I think most will.  Be careful of breathing the dust of the
=
glaze--it's poison! =20
>>> artloverlincoln@gmail.com 11/18/05 8:35 AM >>>
Hi,
I have received a dozen or so jars of Laguna low fire underglazes.=20
Some of them are very dried out.  Is it possible to reconstitute them?
 I have never tried it before.  Any ideas?
Thanks in advance for any experience you can share.
--
Chris Lincoln
---
To unsubscribe go to=20
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Appleworks Presentation to iMovie?
From: ceastman <ceastman@twmi.rr.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Nov 2005 17:27:36 -0500
X-Message-Number: 8
Lauren,
  If you have Keynote on the computer, you can drag the AppleWorks=20
presentation onto it.=A0 It will import into Keynote and then you can=20
export it as a movie.
Linda
On Nov 17, 2005, at 11:13 PM, lava5000@excite.com wrote:
>
>
>
> My students did animations in appleworks presentation. Is there a
way=20=
> for me to to put them into imovie? I love having macs at school,
the=20=
> only problem is that most students will not be able to view their=20
> animations at home. Is there a way to convert presenation to
something=20=
> else. Any ideas or suggestions?
>
>
>
> Thanks in advance,
>
>
>
>  Lauren
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Join Excite! - http://www.excite.com
> The most personalized portal on the Web!
>
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Working with iMovie
From: Mary Hensler <mhensler@shermanisd.net>
Date: Fri, 18 Nov 2005 16:49:16 -0600
X-Message-Number: 9
Lauren,
If you created your animations in the drawing part of Appleworks, you 
should be able to save each drawing as a .jpeg and then import it 
directly into iMovie. Open one presentation and go to File > Save As. 
When the dialog box opens at the bottom is a scroll down menu beneath 
where is says "File Format>" Scroll down and if you see an option listed
as JPEG, just select it.
However, if you created your presentations as a word document or .cwk 
document, you do not have the option to save it as a .jpeg ? you can 
only save it as a word document file and you will not see JPEG as an 
option. A .jpeg is a file format which can be imported into iMovie. On a
PC you will see the .jpeg at the end of a file name.
So if you are able to save each of the student's drawings as a JPEG, you
can then import them into iMovie. I suggest saving all the JPEGs into a 
file folder on the desktop, then open iMovie and select File >Import and
select that file and all of the JPEGs will then be imported into iMovie.
After you import them into iMovie you can then make titles and add sound
which will really make your animations come to life. You can find all 
kinds of off sounds and on the Internet.
When you are ready to save you can export them as a Quicktime movie (in 
several screen sizes) which you can post on a web page, burn to a CD or 
even email. Quicktime is a universal format which is recognized by both 
Mac and PCs. When you have your movie completed, just select File > 
Share and try out the different options. You can save it as a small 
screen which takes less memory to run or you can export as a full screen
which takes time to download and more memory to run. It all depends upon
what you want. But you should be able to email it home to all the 
parents or post to a the school's web page. I have even done the same 
thing with iPhoto which has an easier interface, but it also can be used
to create small animations very easily and can also be exported as 
Quicktime movies. Just play with it; I was able to figure it with only 
the program's Help for assistance the first time I made one, or better 
yet ask the students, I bet they have it figured it out already.
By the way what age group are you working with? I love my Mac lab also, 
but I teach in high school and now have all the software (Macromedia 
Suite and Adobe Creative Suite and Maya), but for simple stuff we still 
use iPhoto and iMovie and the students love working with them to make 
easy slide shows and movies for their web pages.
Good luck, and congratulations for trying to tackle this all by 
yourself! Email me directly if you are still lost.
Mary Hensler
Art & Technology
Sherman High School
Sherman, Texas 75090
mhensler@shermanisd.net
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: What program to use?
From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Nov 2005 17:41:38 -0600
X-Message-Number: 10
Actually, I already solved my problem - I gave up and asked my kids!
There 
is a program on the PC called "Sound Recorder" - you speak into the 
microphone then click "save". SIMPLE! The animation movies are going
really 
well - and what a great project to inspire students AND impress the heck
out 
of my administrator! :-)
~Michal
> Michal, I've been doing clay animation for 5 years now with 8th
graders
> and last year we moved to Windows Movie Maker.
>
>
> I am doing clay animation movies with my middle school students. Some
of
> them want to have their characters "speak" using their own voices. I
> have the microphone, but what program do you use to record their
> talking? The microphone came with the computer, so I'm assuming it has
> some kind of program, but I can download one as well.
>
> ~Michal
> K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
> http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Appleworks Presentation to iMovie?
From: Harold Olejarz <holejarz@gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Nov 2005 19:21:15 -0500
X-Message-Number: 11
Hi,
I am all Apple all the time but I do hate it when they don't give you
any options and in this case they don't. I checked an AppleWorks
presentation file and was shocked to see that they didn't let you save
the slides as jpegs or export them as jpegs. Even Microsoft lets you
export slides as jpegs.
What you can do is use the screen capture to capture each slide as an
image. It is a bit of a pain and time consuming if you have lots of
slides but this seems like the only option to me. Use Coomand-Shift-4
to capture each slide as a graphic. Then the students can take the
images and use a program like graphic converter, a great shareware
product to import the images and create an animated gif. if the
students take all of the images home therre are many PC programs that
create animated gifs. Animated gifs can also be posted on the web.
The screen shots may also be impoted into iMovie and then exported as
a quicktime video or burned onto a DVD.
Next time you do the project check out some of the free open-source
graphic programs that are available. I did a piece on them for this
issue of SchoolArts and it is posted on their
website:http://www.davis-art.com/schoolarts/index.asp The article is
called "Open Source Software is Geek-Speak for Free"
Harold
--
Harold Olejarz
www.olejarz.com
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: RE: November Rose
From: "Linda White" <linda.c.white@gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Nov 2005 18:27:35 -0600
X-Message-Number: 12
Woody, Is that a double delight?  They smell wonderful too.  Linda in OK
I cut a rose last week and it is still beautiful.
So, I shot pics of it yesterday. =
http://www.taospaint.com/November/Rose.html
It will make a great watercolor painting.
Tonight will bring our first freeze, so perhaps my
roses will die for this year. I'll know soon.
Next year should bring even more beautiful blooms.
		Happy Growing, Woody
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Call for articles
From: "Pam" <pgstephens@npgcable.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Nov 2005 17:57:28 -0700
X-Message-Number: 13
May I encourage those of you who are developing and teaching fabulous 
lessons to submit those to School Arts for publication? Guidelines for 
Writing can be found at
http://www.davisart.com/schoolarts/guidelines.asp
Because of space constraints, consider limiting text to 500-words or 
slightly less.
If you have some short lessons, consider submitting 125 - 150 words and
an 
image for the Clip Cards section.
Remember, digital images must be 300 dpi or better. Hardcopy photos and 
slides are also acceptable.
Need a photo release form?
http://www.davisart.com/schoolarts/permission.pdf
If you have questions about the suitability of a topic, contact Nancy or
me 
off list. pgstephens@npgcable.com or nwalkup@netzero.com
Pam
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Travel to France
From: "Pam" <pgstephens@npgcable.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Nov 2005 18:03:45 -0700
X-Message-Number: 14
For those of you in the mood for educational travel with like-minded art
educators and friends, check out the School Arts trip to France for June
16, 
2006. http://www.davisart.com/schoolarts/index.asp#trav
We will meet in Paris and then travel to Avignon (via the TGV -- fast
train) 
before heading to the French Riviera via private motor coach. Most major
US 
gateways are available, although most of our group is traveling out of 
Phoenix or DFW.
Included is round-trip air, ground transfers in France, hotel, breakfast
everyday, bi-lingual tour guide, introductory city tours, TGV ticket,
three 
dinners, hotel taxes, and a few other perks. Visit 
www.artresourcesforteachers.com for detailed information.
This trip was announced in September and then filled quickly. As of
today we 
have been able to secure a few additional spaces. We'd love to have you
join 
us.
Contact nwalkup@netzero.com or pgstephens@npgcable.com for brochures and
reservation forms.
Pam
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: reconstituting Laguna underglazes
From: artgirl109@aol.com
Date: Fri, 18 Nov 2005 22:12:33 -0500
X-Message-Number: 15
I've added water to dried out glazes and it seems to work well.
susie
-----Original Message-----
From: Chris Lincoln <artloverlincoln@gmail.com>
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group 
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Sent: Fri, 18 Nov 2005 08:35:42 -0800
Subject: [teacherartexchange] reconstituting Laguna underglazes
   Hi,
I have received a dozen or so jars of Laguna low fire underglazes.
Some of them are very dried out.  Is it possible to reconstitute them?
 I have never tried it before.  Any ideas?
Thanks in advance for any experience you can share.
--
Chris Lincoln
---
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