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[teacherartexchange] TEN LESSONS THE ARTS TEACH - NAEA in the News

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From: Judy Decker (judy.decker_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Fri Nov 11 2005 - 06:27:52 PST


Greetings Art Educators,

I just received word from Dr. Hatfield that the following "blurb" was
featured in the PEN (Public Education Network) NewsBlast. If I were
you, I would make a poster of these....

TEN LESSONS THE ARTS TEACH

Although some educators view the arts as closer to the rim of education

than to its core, Elliot Eisner argues that the arts are critically

important means for developing complex and subtle aspects of the mind. He

outlines "ten lessons" that illustrate how various forms of thinking are

evoked, developed, and refined through the arts:

(1) The arts teach children to make good judgments about qualitative
relationships;

(2) The arts teach children that problems can have more than one
solution and that
questions can have more than one answer;

(3) The arts celebrate multiple perspectives;

(4) The arts teach children that in complex forms of problem solving
purposes are seldom fixed;

(5) The arts make vivid the fact that neither words in their literal
form nor numbers exhaust what we can know;

(6) The arts teach students that small differences can have large effects;

(7) The arts teach students to think through and within a material;

(8) The arts help children learn to say what cannot be said;

(9) The arts enable us to have experience we can have from no other source; and

(10) The arts' position in the school curriculum symbolizes to the young what
adults believe is important.

http://www.naea-reston.org/tenlessons.html

SOURCE: Eisner, E. (2002). The Arts and the Creation of Mind, In
Chapter 4, What the Arts Teach and How It Shows. (pp. 70-92). Yale
University Press. Available from NAEA Publications.

Be sure to include the source on your poster. Even a simple poster can
help teach importance of correctly citing sources.

Be sure to check out the newly designed NAEA web site.
http://www.naea-reston.org/

Regards,

Judy Decker
Incredible Art Department
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
Incredible Art Resources
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/

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