Note: To protect the privacy of our members, e-mail addresses have been removed from the archived messages. As a result, some links may be broken.

Find Lesson Plans on getty.edu! GettyGames

RE: artsednet digest: November 19, 2002

---------

From: Patricia Banas (pbanas_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Wed Nov 20 2002 - 07:17:11 PST


kimberley,
 I agree with many of the people who mentioned using rubrics.... A great one
that you can use is from "The Art Teachers Book of Lists" by Helen
Hume....the categories are: Elements/principles of design, creativity and
originality, effort and perseverance, craftsmanship and skill and the last
is group cooperation and attitude.... Depending on the project...we delete
the last section on "group cooperation" and simply add in our individual
project criteria....IN my district, we have all adopted this in grades
6-12... it helps with consistency and is a great time saver!
Patty

-----Original Message-----
From: Kevan Nitzberg [mailto:knitzber@ties.k12.mn.us]
Sent: Wednesday, November 20, 2002 7:41 AM
To: ArtsEdNet Talk
Subject: Re: artsednet digest: November 19, 2002

on 11/20/02 2:00 AM, ArtsEdNet Talk digest at artsednet@lists.pub.getty.edu
wrote:

>
> Subject: Grading Art
> From: Kimberly Hutts <kimberly_hutts@yahoo.com>
> Date: Tue, 19 Nov 2002 19:12:35 -0800 (PST)
> X-Message-Number: 37
>
> Hello everyone,
>
> I am in my second year of teaching and have gotten
> myself into a big mess with grading art. I am looking
> for a better system for grading projects and figuring
> final grades for the elementary/middle school level.
> My school has two types of grade cards. The younger
> kids earn 1's, 2's or 3's and the older students earn
> on an A,B,C scale. I would greatly appreciate any
> help that anyone can offer.
Hi Kimberly,

Setting up criteria in advance for assessing student work using a rubric
grid is helpful regardless of what the grade level. In my district in MN.,
the K-12 art program has been designed to also include standard evaluation
criteria in order to meet requirements for learning and ultimately
graduation. At the K-8 level, those standards are preparatory and students
are not held back or penalized for not 'making' standard, but, naturally
their grades reflect the level of work accomplished. The 9-12 grade student
must meet the standard at some level in order to pass the course. At the
present time, the only standard that is applied to K-8 is the Art Creation /
Performance Standard, that is staggered based on grade level in terms of
what is required. In grades 9-12 the Analysis and Interpretation Standard
and the History of Art Standard are also available for students to complete
in advanced art classes. In order to assess the standard packages, a rubric
is used to specifically examine the level of skill acquired by the student
in regards to the task. In truth, that same system is also used to help
assess all student work that fits within the framework of the particular
standard that would be applicable to the skills being taught, to better
assess student achievement on projects. The difficult part of all of this
is the transferring of the rubric score to a recorded score that meets the
overall grading system format. While a '4' on a rubric grid is the highest
level that can be achieved on assessing the development / demonstration of a
particular skill, an 'A' reflects all of the work done in the class,
including that particular part. Teachers are still coming to grips with
finding equitable solutions for meshing the holistic standard score with the
rest of the material considered for the letter grade, but with practice are
becoming more comfortable. Here is a table of rubrics that I helped to
fashion as District Art Content Facilitator using Donna Kay Beattie's
assessment guidelines at the secondary level for work that would be
applicable in the 3 standards mentioned above. Remember that '4' is the
highest level achievable and a '1' is the lowest.

Secondary Level Rubric Structure for Assessing Artwork
Adapted from Assessment in Education, by Donna Kay Beattie
  ( Davis Publications, 1977 - Mass., ISBN 0-87192-363-7 )

Grad Standard: Arts Creation and Performance

       
Level 4:

*Approaches work in an highly individualized and expressive manner.
*Develops ideas that are conceptually strong and reveal important insights.
*Demonstrates a passionate and keen intellectual and creative curiosity
toward work.
*Exhibits highly developed abilities in successfully applying learned
knowledge and skills pertaining to visual language, structures, forms, and
vocabulary.

Level 3:

*Nearly always approaches work in an independent and expressive manner.
*Develops ideas of conceptual importance.
*Is inquisitive with regard to work and willing to explore it intellectually
and creatively.
*Demonstrates successful application of learned knowledge and skills
pertaining to visual language, structures, forms and vocabulary.

Level 2:

*May work in a personalized and expressive manner in some instances, but is
occasionally dependent on guidance.
*Develops ideas that are sometimes meaningful or important.
*Frequently exhibits an intellectual and creative curiosity that drives
work.
*Is usually able to apply learned knowledge and skills pertaining to visual
language, structures, forms and vocabulary with frequent success.

Level 1:

*Works in a haphazard manner with little understanding of a successful
problem-solving process and requires frequent direction.
*Exhibits ideas that are generally mundane and trivial.
*At times shows a spark of intellectual or creative curiosity toward work.
*Occasionally shows deliberate application of learned knowledge and skills
pertaining to visual language, structures, forms and vocabulary with some
success.

Grad Standard - Arts Analysis and Interpretation

                
Level 4:

*Demonstrates a comprehensive knowledge of many contexts (personal, social,
cultural, historical, philosophical, technological, environmental, economic,
aesthetic), surrounding and impacting work.
*Describes, analyzes, interprets and evaluates information and images with
sound reasons and insight that reflect a value system. Analyses and
conclusions are accurate, detailed, insightful, valid and consistent with
data.
*Responds to feedback with personal insight and incorporates own ideas and
suggestions.
*Revises work when necessary with highly successful outcomes.

 Level 3:

*Demonstrates broad knowledge of various contexts (personal, social,
cultural, historical, philosophical, technological, environmental, economic,
aesthetic), surrounding and impacting work.
*Is able to describe, analyze, interpret and evaluate information and images
with justification. Analyses and conclusions are accurate and consistent
with data.
*Responds to feedback with personal insight and uses it to achieve
successful results.
*Revises work when necessary with successful results.
   
Level 2:

*Demonstrates rudimentary knowledge of several contexts (personal, cultural,
historical, technological), surrounding and impacting work.
*Demonstrates ability to describe, analyze, interpret and judge information
and images. Analyses and conclusions are usually correct.
*Employs feedback with satisfactory results.
*Is able to revise work for acceptable results.

Level 1:

*Demonstrates limited knowledge of a few contexts (personal, cultural,
historical), surrounding and impacting work.
*Demonstrates limited ability to describe, classify and analyze information
and images. Analyses and conclusions are often unclear or inaccurate.

Grad Standard - Art History (Inquiry)
                 
                  
Level 4:

*Demonstrates exemplary ability to plan and conduct in-depth, personal and
adventurous research which results in highly successful solution of complex
themes, problems, issues, techniques, or processes.
*Utilizes a vast amount and variety of appropriate sources and means to
gather information.

Level 3:

*Conducts sufficient planning and research enabling selection, development
and solution of complex and personal themes, problems, issues, techniques,
or processes.
*Uses a wide variety of appropriate sources and means to find information.

Level 2:

*Is often self-directed in planning and conducting research which
contributes to successful selection, development and solution of most
themes, problems, issues, techniques, or processes.
*Uses several meaningful sources to gather information.

Level 1:

*With frequent teacher help is able to plan and conduct research that leads
to selection, development, or solution of a few satisfactory themes,
problems, issues, techniques, or processes.
*Selects a few appropriate sources for answers.

I hope that this helps to give you some ideas in implementing your own
grading criteria.

Kevan Nitzberg
Anoka-Hennepin School District
AEM President Elect
Minnesota

---
---