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Re: artsednet digest: November 17, 2002

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From: Kevan Nitzberg (knitzber_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Mon Nov 18 2002 - 05:30:26 PST


on 11/18/02 2:00 AM, ArtsEdNet Talk digest at artsednet@lists.pub.getty.edu
wrote:

> Subject: shocked here in NYC too
> From: ejb35@columbia.edu
> Date: Sun, 17 Nov 2002 08:30:26 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 4
>
>
> I don't have the full story, but there is a proposal to eliminate
> the art/music requirement at the h.s. level. What would this
> scenario do to college arts programs? To art education teaching?
> I'll post more later but get ready to write letters...Jane in
> Brooklyn
As a former B'klyn kid, I thought I would respond to your concern. Here is
the latest FYI from the NAEA regarding arts in education:

NAEA STATELINE POLICY NEWS

NATIONAL ART EDUCATION ASSOCIATION
Office of the Executive Director
Phone 703-860-8000 Fax 703-860-2960
Home Pagečhttp://www.naea-reston.org
E-mail: thatfield@naea-reston.org

For Release November 15, 2002

WHAT STATES ARE DOING

MINNESOTA GRADUATION RULE IN JEOPARDY. The recent election in Minnesota has
caused supporters of the Profile of Learning graduation requirement much
worry, as the new governor has sworn to "scrap it and replace it with
rigorous new standards based on reading, writing, math and science,"
according to Governor-elect Pawlenty's spokesman. One difficulty lies in the
fact that if the Profile of Learning is eliminated, Minnesota risks
non-compliance with portions of the "No Child Left Behind" legislation
dealing with academic standards. The Profile of Learning became official in
the 1998-99 school year and has costs tens of millions of dollars to
implement. Minnesota's Commissioner of the Department of Children, Families
and Learning, Christine Jax, believes that she and the new governor can work
toward the same goal of repairing the Profile rather than getting rid of it.
She is working on changes to present to the new governor and legislature.

KENTUCKY STATE BOARD INTENDS TO SAVE ITS ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEM. Considering
changes to the state's accountability system to comply with the federal No
Child Left Behind Act, the Kentucky State Board of Education decided this
week to keep their model largely intact and will seek to persuade the U.S.
Department of Education that what is already in place can achieve the law's
overarching goals for improving student achievement. While the goals may be
the same, Kentucky's accountability system differs in several critical ways
with what is required in the federal act.

The state's method of evaluating school performance is based on an index
score derived from student achievement in seven subject areas with weight
given to increasing the number of students deemed proficient. NCLB mandates
that schools increase the percentage of students identified as proficient in
each of at least four demographic subgroups - race/ethnicity, socioeconomic
status, English proficiency, and disability - by a set amount each year.
Schools that fail to increase their percentage of proficient students in any
subgroup, or fail to increase graduation rates, will be identified as
low-performing.

While the Board avoided any major tinkering now, one state board member
expressed frustration with the possibility that the federal government would
eventually force changes to the accountability system and resigned from the
Board in protest. William Weinberg, a member since 1998 who had a hand in
formulating the current system, stepped down as the Board was deliberating
about how to incorporate the federal requirements into state policies. "We
have a system that is workable and I think it's going to work if the feds
would leave it alone...At best, No Child Left Behind is a federal unfunded
mandate and a law that just is an unwarranted intrusion into state and local
public education...At worst, it's a cynical attempt by the Bush
administration to finally put together over time such a poor record of
public
education... that it winds up being an excuse for them to move into
vouchers," Weinberg said.

PENNSYLVANIA BOARD APPROVES TEACHER CERTIFICATION PLAN. The Pennsylvania
State Board of Education approved a plan that aims to ensure that only fully
certified teachers are teaching arts, science, math, foreign language,
English, and government and civics by 2006, as required by the federal No
Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). Major elements of the plan, which was adopted
by a 11-2 vote after two hours of intense debate, include the following: 1)
Teachers certified in one subject will be able to become certified in
another
by passing a certification test. 2) Teachers certified in most other states
will be able to obtain Pennsylvania certification if they have a bachelor's
degree in the subject, three years of satisfactory teaching experience
within
the past seven years, and a qualifying score on a certification test. 3)
Teachers with elementary certifications who teach seventh and eighth grades
will need to pass content-area tests in their subject matter. 4)
Paraprofessional classroom assistants will have to attain at least an
associate degree. 5) Districts will be encouraged to hire college graduates
and mid-career professionals who have earned bachelor's degrees in other
fields and seek to become certified through the state's intern program or
similar brief training programs such as Teach For America. The latter
provision stimulated the most debate, with critics claiming that it weakens
state teaching standards and does not do enough to ensure that experienced
and qualified teachers will be assigned to the neediest students. During the
last school year, nearly 5,200 out of 125,000 Pennsylvania teachers were
using emergency permits, which are issued on a provisional basis after
efforts to hire fully certified permanent teachers have failed. About 70
percent of those teachers were in large urban school districts.
Philadelphia,
in which more than half of the 600 new teachers hired this year lacked full
certification, is already out of compliance, but the state has not taken any
action.

REPORTS

Claims that three PRIVATE COMPANIES HIRED TO RUN PUBLIC SCHOOLS do
significantly better -- or worse -- at improving student performance than
traditional public schools cannot be substantiated, according to a report
from the General Accounting Office. The companies include Edison Schools,
Mosaica Education and Chancellor Beacon Academies.
http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d0311.pdf

According to a poll conducted for the Annenberg Institute for School Reform
at Brown University, urban Americans reject "one-school-at-a-time"
approaches
to improving URBAN SCHOOLS. The poll found a strong preference for
districtwide solutions that target all schools within a community.
http://www.annenberginstitute.org/mediacenter/pr_poll.html

The U.S. Department of Education has produced a reference manual to the NO
CHILD LEFT BEHIND ACT. For each section of the law, the manual details the
purpose of the program, what is new in the law, how the program works, key
requirements, how performance is measured and key activities and
responsibilities for state education departments.
http://www.ed.gov/PressReleases/10-2002/10212002.html

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION "NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND" IMPLEMENTATION SITE

No Child Left Behind Home Page http://www.ed.gov/nclb/
Allocations of funds by state http://www.ed.gov/offices/OUS/budnews.html
Text of the Law http://www.ed.gov/legislation/ESEA02/
Text of regulations & guidance http://www.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/

Kevan Nitzberg
President Elect, Art Educators of MN

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