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Re: student killed - what to do

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From: Bunki Kramer (bkramer_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Sun Nov 11 2001 - 09:55:22 PST


from: Bunki Kramer (bkramer@srvusd.k12.ca.us)
Los Cerros Middle School
968 Blemer Road
 Danville, CA 94526
art webpage - http://ww2.lcms.srvusd.k12.ca.us/faculty/faculty.html
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From: "Deb Mortl" <dmortl@hotmail.com>
I just got a call from my principal that one of my senior girls was killed
last night in a car accident. She was very popular and well-known and
well-liked by the whole class. I don't know how to handle this with my
classes tomorrow - I have all advanced classes of upper classmen who were
friends with her. I don't want it to be business as usual - what can I do
with them? Is there an art process that I can do? I am completely shocked
right now and can't even think...Thanks -Deb
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Deb. I attended a workshop at NAEA two years ago run by Ken Viel (not sure
of the spelling) who wrote From Ordinary to Extraordinary. He went into more
depth of a student's death than was written in his book as one of his
projects (and it was very moving) but I wanted to mention this book as an
example of how his students handled this painful experience. One of the
examples had the students collecting med. sized rocks, cleaning, and
painting them with a gold painted streak running through the mid. of each
student's rock as a connection of spirit. These were placed in a wooded spot
nearby in a circle (and carefully cultivated) and was a sort of "reflection"
spot one could go to for silent thoughts.

If this appeals to something within you, then I suggest you locate this book
for more inspiration and ideas. I feel it was handled so tastefully as well
as artistically. Toodles....Bunki

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