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Re: Paper casting

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gregjuli_at_TeacherArtExchange
Date: Sun Nov 26 2000 - 10:51:37 PST


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Hi LP
I've done casting with 7th graders- no problem and very nice results. I
highly recommend it.
A simpler way of doing it is to do a negative form, not a relief or
positive. The students rolled out a slab that was about 3/4 in thick.
Take design/image and transfer it to slab by pressing through paper
(manila or newsprint) with a pencil. Remove paper and carve out
features with a loop tool or modeling tool. They can vary the depth of
the carved out areas for interest in the casting.
Helpful hint- make sure all carves edges are smooth( easier removal).
After a bisque firing , spray the molds with acrylic gloss to seal . I
have the kids spray a bit of PAM cooking spray as a release agent and
wipe all over the mold. The slight amount of oil does not effect the
paper.
They love adding the paper pulp to the molds by scooping up pulp with
their fingers and letting the water seep through their fingers . Press
pulp into molds and remove water by pressing a sponge many times over
the pulp( have a bucket at table for them to squeeze out excess water.
Takes at least a good 24 hours or more to dry.
They look great glued to various colored mat boards.
MaryB

"L. P. Skeen" wrote:

> Went to the local arts show yesterday and saw some cast paper. This
> gave me an idea to do that with a class. Anyone else ever done this
> with their classes, and if so, can you give me some pointers?

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Hi&nbsp; LP
<br>I've done casting with 7th graders- no problem and very nice results.
I highly recommend it.
<br>A simpler way of doing it is to do a negative form, not a relief or
positive.&nbsp; The students rolled out a slab that was about 3/4 in thick.&nbsp;
Take design/image and transfer it to slab by pressing through paper (manila
or newsprint) with a pencil.&nbsp; Remove paper and carve out features
with a loop tool or modeling tool. They can vary the depth of the carved
out areas for interest in the casting.
<br>Helpful hint- make sure all carves edges are smooth( easier removal).
<br>After a bisque firing , spray the molds with acrylic gloss to seal
&nbsp; I have the kids spray a&nbsp; bit of PAM cooking spray as a release
agent&nbsp; and wipe all over the mold.&nbsp; The slight amount of oil
does not effect the paper.
<br>They love adding the paper pulp to the molds by scooping up pulp with
their fingers and letting the water seep through their fingers . Press
pulp into molds and remove water by pressing a sponge many times over the
pulp( have a bucket at table for them to squeeze out excess water.&nbsp;&nbsp;
Takes at least a good 24 hours or more to dry.
<br><font face="Lucida Sans">They look great glued to various colored mat
boards.</font>
<br><font face="Lucida Sans">MaryB</font><font face="Lucida Sans"></font>
<p>"L. P. Skeen" wrote:
<blockquote TYPE=CITE><style></style>
<font face="Arial"><font size=-1>Went
to the local arts show yesterday and saw some cast paper.&nbsp; This gave
me an idea to do that with a class.&nbsp; Anyone else ever done this with
their classes, and if so, can you give me some pointers?</font></font></blockquote>

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