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RE: grading and conferences

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From: Julie Brady (7.jbrady_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Fri Nov 10 2000 - 08:29:13 PST


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I would re-word artistic merit, or not even use it. When I give my students
a rubric at the beginning of a project, I focus it around specific concepts.
Eg: for a still life watercolor - drawing (use of space and proportions,
painting (values and contrast), etc. I also give part of their grade on
effort (how they use time in class). Some students might put their whole
heart into their work and try as hard as they can and still turn out what we
would consider "not aesthetically pleasing". But if the student
incorporated the concepts, tried their hardest, and used critical thinking,
then I think they deserve an A or B. As teachers, our job is to encourage
their efforts, not discourage. Also, it will make your life much easier if
you have "measurable" objectives.

Julie

"I still was attacked because one of the criteria in my rubrics includes
what I
termed as "artistic merit" , even though this accounted for only up to
20
points out of a possible 80."

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<P><FONT SIZE=3D2>&nbsp;</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>I would re-word artistic merit, or not even use =
it.&nbsp; When I give my students a rubric at the beginning of a =
project, I focus it around specific concepts.&nbsp; Eg:&nbsp; for a =
still life watercolor - drawing (use of space and proportions, painting =
(values and contrast), etc.&nbsp; I also give part of their grade on =
effort (how they use time in class).&nbsp; Some students might put =
their whole heart into their work and try as hard as they can and still =
turn out what we would consider &quot;not aesthetically =
pleasing&quot;.&nbsp; But if the student incorporated the concepts, =
tried their hardest, and used critical thinking, then I think they =
deserve an A or B.&nbsp; As teachers, our job is to encourage their =
efforts, not discourage.&nbsp; Also, it will make your life much easier =
if you have &quot;measurable&quot; objectives.</FONT></P>

<P><FONT SIZE=3D2>Julie</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=3D2>&quot;I still was attacked because one of the =
criteria in my rubrics includes</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>what I </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>termed as &quot;artistic merit&quot; , even though =
this accounted for only up to</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>20 </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>points out of a possible 80.&quot;</FONT>
</P>

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