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Lesson Plans


publicity

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Linda Kelty (lckelty)
Sun, 24 May 2099 19:21:12 -0400


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I've been reading about the lack of cooperation with publicity. Having =
had to do p.r. in my first position as assistant director for an art =
center, I learned some things that may help you.

1) Find out what catagory your program would fit into with your local =
paper. Is it human interest? Social? Entertainment and the Arts?
2) Find out which reporters are typically assigned to those catagories. =
Establish an amicable working relationship with them by:
a) Write up your own press releases and include "contributed" =
photos in black and
white. HAND deliver them. Refuse to give them to a =
receptionist, prepare to meet
with someone "in charge". Be prepared to cool your heels =
awhile.
b) Thank that person for their time. Express an interest and =
appreciation for the=20
related events that you have seen covered. =20
c) Write a letter to the editor thanking the paper for their =
coverage, support of the
program and the benefits to the students. They can't =
publish a personal letter to
a staff member, but a letter to the editor complimenting =
them can be published and
reflects well on them which makes them more amenable to =
future coverage.
d) Chocolate chip cookies at a later date make everyone smile. =
They "lounge" too.
e) Keep the writing short and succinct, especially at first. =
They may wind up using
your story as a small filler piece and may be more willing =
to use your project or=20
program as a feature later.

Above all, make it easy for them, be friendly and welcoming and willing =
to assist them and realize they have to work within parameters too. =
When they are sent to cover something, unless they are a seasoned =
photographer, they may be insecure in doing more than they're instructed =
to or burnt out from too many years at it. Befriend them without asking =
anything of them at first. There are various editors and reporters on =
every paper who will help you once they know you. Make the initial =
efforts yourself.
Hope this helps. No, I don't have the problem getting coverage, but =
ours is a small town paper too. I guess I'd take this approach no =
matter where I lived because people are still people no matter where you =
live. Be proactive people. Lets problem solve instead of complain, ok? =
Linda K. in Iowa=20

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I've been reading about the lack of = cooperation=20 with publicity. Having had to do p.r. in my first position as assistant = director=20 for an art center, I learned some things that may help you.
 
1)  Find out what catagory your = program=20 would fit into with your local paper.  Is it human interest?  = Social?=20 Entertainment and the Arts?
2) Find out which reporters are = typically=20 assigned to those catagories.  Establish an amicable working = relationship=20 with them by:
        a)=20 Write up your own press releases and include "contributed" = photos in=20 black and
          &nbs= p;=20 white.  HAND deliver them.  Refuse to give them to a = receptionist,=20 prepare to meet
          &nbs= p; with=20 someone "in charge".  Be prepared to cool your heels=20 awhile.
        b)=20 Thank that person for their time.  Express an interest and = appreciation for=20 the 
          &nbs= p;=20 related events that you have seen covered.  
        c)=20 Write a letter to the editor thanking the paper for their coverage, = support of=20 the
          &nbs= p;=20 program and the benefits to the students.  They can't publish a = personal=20 letter to
          &nbs= p; a=20 staff member, but a letter to the editor complimenting them can be = published=20 and
          &nbs= p;=20 reflects well on them which makes them more amenable to future=20 coverage.
        d)=20 Chocolate chip cookies at a later date make everyone smile.  They=20 "lounge" too.
        e)=20 Keep the writing short and succinct, especially at first.  They may = wind up=20 using
          &nbs= p; your=20 story as a small filler piece and may be more willing to use your = project=20 or 
          &nbs= p;=20 program as a feature later.
 
Above all, make it easy for them, be = friendly=20 and welcoming and willing to assist them and realize they have to work = within=20 parameters too.  When they are sent to cover something, unless they = are a=20 seasoned photographer, they may be insecure in doing more than they're=20 instructed to or burnt out from too many years at it.  Befriend = them=20 without asking anything of them at first.  There are various = editors and=20 reporters on every paper who will help you once they know you.  = Make the=20 initial efforts yourself.
Hope this helps.  No, I don't = have the=20 problem getting coverage, but ours is a small town paper too.  I = guess I'd=20 take this approach no matter where I lived because people are still = people no=20 matter where you live.  Be proactive people.  Lets problem = solve=20 instead of complain, ok?   Linda K. in=20 Iowa 
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