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Lesson Plans


Re: "artist workshop" method of art ed

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Rodney and Barbara Boville (rboville)
Sun, 16 May 1999 23:21:55 -0500


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Welcome, I am an art specialist in Green Bay, Barbara Boville. I loved =
your introductory letter and struggle with product vs. process... I love =
the motto above your door. May I borrow it? I have found that weaving =
with everything and anything allows for a great amount of expression and =
excitement. also collage. I will try to gather some more "definite" =
ideas soon. I am totally pooped tonight. My son just graduated from med =
school this weekend, very exciting, wonderfull, but exhausting. More =
later:)=20
-----Original Message-----
From: Mary Jeanne Linford <mjlinford>
To: artsed listserv <artsednet.edu>
Date: Saturday, May 15, 1999 11:05 PM
Subject: "artist workshop" method of art ed
=20
=20
Hi, all...
Just joined the list and am interested in pursuing discussion about =
the "artist workshop" method of art education. This is loosely based on =
the 'writing workshop' concept championed by Nancie Atwell, Lucy Calkins =
and Donald Murray, and was the subject of a book by Karen Earnst titled =
"Painting Learning". =20
=20
I come from a studio background (printmaking and book arts) and =
approach teaching from that perspective. I do have a formal art =
education background and am certified to teach K-12 art. I have been the =
K-5 art specialist in a school of 560 children in a suburban semi-rural =
island in Puget Sound in Washington State for the past six years. Our =
school district is constructing a new intermediate school for grades =
5-6, and I will be the art specialist there. I will see the fifth grade =
students a total of 36 times in 45 minute blocks, and the sixth grade =
students 72 times in 45 minute blocks (except band students, who will =
get 18 classes). =20
=20
I am especially interested in developing the 'artist process' in my =
students. I am less interested in lesson plans whereby I come up with =
the cool idea and students have very little power to affect the outcome =
other than minor personal differences. The dilemma I have is in skills =
development. Earnst only worked with two dimensional art with her =
students, and I am not impressed with her student work...her fourth =
grade students are capable of much more sophistication and skill, both =
in observation and composition. I am more interested in my students =
understanding the motto I have above my door..."the art room...where =
vision is made visual". I want them to begin to develop a personal =
imagery that they use within the context of their artwork, and have the =
freedom to pursue that imagery using a rich variety of materials and =
media. However, I was trained in the traditional 'lesson plan' with =
objectives where all students will gain a specific set of skills, etc. =
This has worked very well for the most part, and my students have =
experienced a scope and sequence of skills development that has resulted =
in some pretty spectacular work in the fifth grade. Why mess with a =
good thing? Because I think fifth and sixth grade students are capable =
of making the leap both mentally and developmentally to the next =
step...understanding art as more than making cool objects and pretty =
pictures...that it has value and importance beyond simple aesthetic =
enjoyment, and could be used to help them express who THEY are, and help =
them get through hormones and all that with a little more dignity and =
self-awareness. So, why not rely on the skills they develop in the =
primary grades by the other art specialists? Because I have the most =
rigorous program (modesty aside...I wish it was otherwise). The skill =
level my students exhibit is a bit better than the other schools...I =
won't be able to count on their knowing good construction methods and =
craftsmanship, principles and elements, etc. when they walk in my door, =
much less experience in all of the media.
=20
Ideas? Suggestions? References?
=20
thanks in advance...
=20
MJ
mjlinford
=20

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Welcome, I am an art specialist in = Green Bay,=20 Barbara Boville. I loved your introductory letter and struggle with = product vs.=20 process... I love the motto above your door. May I borrow it? I have = found that=20 weaving with everything and anything allows for a great amount of = expression and=20 excitement. also collage. I will try to gather some more = "definite"=20 ideas soon. I am totally pooped tonight. My son just graduated from med = school=20 this weekend, very exciting, wonderfull, but exhausting. More later:)=20
-----Original = Message-----
From:=20 Mary Jeanne Linford <mjlinford= >
To:=20 artsed listserv <artsednet.edu= >
Date:=20 Saturday, May 15, 1999 11:05 PM
Subject: "artist=20 workshop" method of art ed

Hi, all...
Just joined the list and am = interested in=20 pursuing discussion about the "artist workshop" method of = art=20 education.  This is loosely based on the 'writing workshop' = concept=20 championed by Nancie Atwell, Lucy Calkins and Donald Murray, and was = the=20 subject of a book by  Karen Earnst titled "Painting=20 Learning". 
 
I come from a studio background = (printmaking=20 and book arts) and approach teaching from that perspective.  I = do have=20 a formal art education background and am certified to teach K-12 = art. I have=20 been the K-5 art specialist in a school of 560 children in a = suburban=20 semi-rural island in Puget Sound in Washington State for the past = six=20 years.  Our school district is constructing a new intermediate = school=20 for grades 5-6, and I will be the art specialist there.  I will = see the=20 fifth grade students a total of 36 times in 45 minute blocks, and = the sixth=20 grade students 72 times in 45 minute blocks (except band students, = who will=20 get 18 classes). 
 
I am especially interested in = developing the=20 'artist process' in my students.    I am less interested = in lesson=20 plans whereby I come up with the cool idea and students have very = little=20 power to affect the outcome other than minor personal = differences.  The=20 dilemma I have is in skills development.  Earnst only worked = with two=20 dimensional art with her students, and I am not impressed with her = student=20 work...her fourth grade students are capable of much more = sophistication and=20 skill, both in observation and composition.  I am more = interested in my=20 students understanding the motto I have above my door..."the = art=20 room...where vision is made visual".  I want them to begin = to=20 develop a personal imagery that they use within the context of their = artwork, and have the freedom to pursue that imagery using a rich = variety of=20 materials and media.  However, I was trained in the traditional = 'lesson=20 plan' with objectives where all students will gain a specific set of = skills,=20 etc.  This has worked very well for the most part, and my = students have=20 experienced a scope and sequence of skills development that has = resulted in=20 some pretty spectacular work in the fifth grade.  Why mess with = a good=20 thing?  Because I think fifth and sixth grade students are = capable of=20 making the leap both mentally and developmentally to the next=20 step...understanding art as more than making cool objects and pretty = pictures...that it has value and importance beyond simple aesthetic=20 enjoyment, and could be used to help them express who THEY are, and = help=20 them get through hormones and all that with a little more dignity = and=20 self-awareness.  So, why not rely on the skills they develop in = the=20 primary grades by the other art specialists?  Because I have = the most=20 rigorous program (modesty aside...I wish it was otherwise).  = The skill=20 level my students exhibit is a bit better than the other schools...I = won't=20 be able to count on=20 their knowing good construction methods and craftsmanship, = principles and=20 elements, etc. when they walk in my door, much less experience in = all of the=20 media.
 
Ideas?  Suggestions? =20 References?
 
thanks in = advance...
 
MJ
mjlinford=
 
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