Note: To protect the privacy of our members, e-mail addresses have been removed from the archived messages. As a result, some links may be broken.

Lesson Plans


"artist workshop" method of art ed

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Mary Jeanne Linford (mjlinford)
Sat, 15 May 1999 20:28:32 -0700


This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_00A1_01BE9F11.803A08E0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi, all...
Just joined the list and am interested in pursuing discussion about the
"artist workshop" method of art education. This is loosely based on the
'writing workshop' concept championed by Nancie Atwell, Lucy Calkins and
Donald Murray, and was the subject of a book by Karen Earnst titled
"Painting Learning".

I come from a studio background (printmaking and book arts) and approach
teaching from that perspective. I do have a formal art education background
and am certified to teach K-12 art. I have been the K-5 art specialist in a
school of 560 children in a suburban semi-rural island in Puget Sound in
Washington State for the past six years. Our school district is
constructing a new intermediate school for grades 5-6, and I will be the art
specialist there. I will see the fifth grade students a total of 36 times
in 45 minute blocks, and the sixth grade students 72 times in 45 minute
blocks (except band students, who will get 18 classes).

I am especially interested in developing the 'artist process' in my
students. I am less interested in lesson plans whereby I come up with the
cool idea and students have very little power to affect the outcome other
than minor personal differences. The dilemma I have is in skills
development. Earnst only worked with two dimensional art with her students,
and I am not impressed with her student work...her fourth grade students are
capable of much more sophistication and skill, both in observation and
composition. I am more interested in my students understanding the motto I
have above my door..."the art room...where vision is made visual". I want
them to begin to develop a personal imagery that they use within the context
of their artwork, and have the freedom to pursue that imagery using a rich
variety of materials and media. However, I was trained in the traditional
'lesson plan' with objectives where all students will gain a specific set of
skills, etc. This has worked very well for the most part, and my students
have experienced a scope and sequence of skills development that has
resulted in some pretty spectacular work in the fifth grade. Why mess with
a good thing? Because I think fifth and sixth grade students are capable of
making the leap both mentally and developmentally to the next
step...understanding art as more than making cool objects and pretty
pictures...that it has value and importance beyond simple aesthetic
enjoyment, and could be used to help them express who THEY are, and help
them get through hormones and all that with a little more dignity and
self-awareness. So, why not rely on the skills they develop in the primary
grades by the other art specialists? Because I have the most rigorous
program (modesty aside...I wish it was otherwise). The skill level my
students exhibit is a bit better than the other schools...I won't be able to
count on their knowing good construction methods and craftsmanship,
principles and elements, etc. when they walk in my door, much less
experience in all of the media.

Ideas? Suggestions? References?

thanks in advance...

MJ
mjlinford

------=_NextPart_000_00A1_01BE9F11.803A08E0
Content-Type: text/html;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN">

Hi, all...
Just joined the list and am = interested in=20 pursuing discussion about the "artist workshop" method of art=20 education.  This is loosely based on the 'writing workshop' concept = championed by Nancie Atwell, Lucy Calkins and Donald Murray, and was the = subject=20 of a book by  Karen Earnst titled "Painting = Learning". =20
 
I come from a studio background = (printmaking and=20 book arts) and approach teaching from that perspective.  I do have = a formal=20 art education background and am certified to teach K-12 art. I have been = the K-5=20 art specialist in a school of 560 children in a suburban semi-rural = island in=20 Puget Sound in Washington State for the past six years.  Our school = district is constructing a new intermediate school for grades 5-6, and I = will be=20 the art specialist there.  I will see the fifth grade students a = total of=20 36 times in 45 minute blocks, and the sixth grade students 72 times in = 45 minute=20 blocks (except band students, who will get 18 classes).  =
 
I am especially interested in = developing the=20 'artist process' in my students.    I am less interested in = lesson=20 plans whereby I come up with the cool idea and students have very little = power=20 to affect the outcome other than minor personal differences.  The = dilemma I=20 have is in skills development.  Earnst only worked with two = dimensional art=20 with her students, and I am not impressed with her student work...her = fourth=20 grade students are capable of much more sophistication and skill, both = in=20 observation and composition.  I am more interested in my students=20 understanding the motto I have above my door..."the art = room...where vision=20 is made visual".  I want them to begin to develop a personal = imagery=20 that they use within the context of their artwork, and have the freedom = to=20 pursue that imagery using a rich variety of materials and media.  = However,=20 I was trained in the traditional 'lesson plan' with objectives where all = students will gain a specific set of skills, etc.  This has worked = very=20 well for the most part, and my students have experienced a scope and = sequence of=20 skills development that has resulted in some pretty spectacular work in = the=20 fifth grade.  Why mess with a good thing?  Because I think = fifth and=20 sixth grade students are capable of making the leap both mentally and=20 developmentally to the next step...understanding art as more than making = cool=20 objects and pretty pictures...that it has value and importance beyond = simple=20 aesthetic enjoyment, and could be used to help them express who THEY = are, and=20 help them get through hormones and all that with a little more dignity = and=20 self-awareness.  So, why not rely on the skills they develop in the = primary=20 grades by the other art specialists?  Because I have the most = rigorous=20 program (modesty aside...I wish it was otherwise).  The skill level = my=20 students exhibit is a bit better than the other schools...I won't be = able to=20 count on = their knowing=20 good construction methods and craftsmanship, principles and elements, = etc. when=20 they walk in my door, much less experience in all of the = media.
 
Ideas?  Suggestions? =20 References?
 
thanks in advance...
 
MJ
mjlinford=
 
------=_NextPart_000_00A1_01BE9F11.803A08E0--

  • Reply: Rodney and Barbara Boville: "Re: "artist workshop" method of art ed"