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Re: [teacherartexchange] Creativity anyone?

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From: Marvin Bartel (marvinpb_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Thu May 29 2008 - 11:04:18 PDT


>
Cindy wrote:

>Our neighborhood was hit by a serious hailstorm. Every house is having to
>have their roof replaced this month. We all have wooden shingles. I
>therefore have access to thousands of these weathered shingles. What could
>I do with them with my students?
>

So sorry to hear about the hailstorm, but what a splendid opportunity.

What if Idea Generation would be on TOP of our list of Art Learning Standards?
What if us teachers would NOT feel the need to provide the ideas?
What if students would learn how to think of ideas? What that be ULTIMATE art education?

What if students would play a SHINGLE IDEA GAME? (teaching creativity step by step)

ROUND ONE
1. Give each student five used shingles.
2. Begin by getting them into teams of five (25 shingles all together). Allow more if needed.
3. Each team is as diverse as possible so that each team is equally capable with good leaders, listeners, creators, questioners, tool skills, answers, etc.
4. After 10 minutes, each team proposes their most creative idea proposal.
5. Teams gets points if they have an ORIGINAL idea that no other team has thought of.
    Bonus points are given for COOL IDEA, FUNCTIONAL IDEA, VERY ORIGINAL IDEA, BEAUTIFUL IDEA, WIDE IDEA, ETC. (allow students to add categories used to judge the ideas).

NOTE: Some of the most successful corporations are organized into teams that share their ideas with other teams in a totally open and sharing, but competitive corporate idea development culture. Other corporations keep secrets from each other during product and service development competition. The ones with the open and sharing competitive cultures are most successful and profitable because they put the highest value on the best ideas at an early stage and have fewer limits on the their potential for improvements.

ROUND TWO
1. After the first sharing session, play a second round when teams try to improve on any idea that was mentioned in the first round by their own team or by any other team.
2. Repeat 4 and 5 above.

STEP THREE
Teams create one or more products based on their best proposals. They are encouraged to look for improvements, negotiate, and make improvements as they work even when the ideas were not included in their original proposals.

STEP FOUR
Stop when the teams are about 70 percent finished and have all teams review every other team's efforts and try to generate improvements and refinements for themselves and for others.

STEP FIVE
As they finish, have teams write summaries of the main points of their idea generation and product development giving credit to the individual students that made each contribution to the process and the product. Include each student's name and ask them to write down the best contribution made by each person on the team. No negative comments.

STEP SIX
Display the work and the idea development summaries.
Provide paper and invite written comments and responses from other teachers and students in the school.

STEP SEVEN
Send me some feedback on how well this worked.

Marvin

Marvin Bartel, Ed.D., Professor of Art Emeritus
Goshen College, 1700 South Main, Goshen IN 46526
studio phone: 574-533-0171
Teaching Idea Generation: http://www.bartelart.com/arted/ideas.html
http://www.bartelart.com
http://www.goshen.edu/art/ed/art-ed-links.html

"Art is me when I am myself." ... a kindergarten girl when asked, "What is art?"
"You can't never know how to do it before you never did it before." ... a kindergarten boy working with clay for the first time.

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