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Re:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: May 19, 2006

---------

From: Bill Sechler (BillSe_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Mon May 22 2006 - 11:04:40 PDT


Color is a very broad topic and there are several answers to each of the
color theory questions raised here. such as, there are differences
between "Additive (RGB) and Subtractive (CMYK)" and "Artist's pallette"
(uses both additive and subtractive theories) color systems. Greys can
be made with black and white or complimentary color saturation mixtures
complicating the "opposite color" question. The following links may
assist in providing answers to your questions:
http://www.colormatters.com/ PC and Mac
ftp://ftp.sdsc.edu/pub/sdsc/graphics/interactive_color/ This site
appears to be Mac only and it is excellent.
http://www.thetech.org/exhibits_events/online/color/overview/ PC and
Mac
Enjoy.

>>> "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest"
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu> 5/20/2006 12:00 AM >>>
TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Friday, May 19, 2006.

1. Responding to student questions
2. Looking for Heiroglyph Sheet
3. inquiry-based instruction
4. Re: Looking for Heiroglyph Sheet
5. ambigrams
6. Re: Looking for Heiroglyph Sheet
7. Re: ambigrams
8. Hatsheput: From Queen to Pharaoh (slide show of images)
9. Re: teaching grades k-12
10. NAEA Release - Art Education: The Development of Public Policy
11. art show on line
12. Re: art show on line

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Responding to student questions
From: Marvin Bartel <marvinpb@goshen.edu>
Date: Fri, 19 May 2006 08:11:24 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Randy wrote:
>I teach high school art. A student rushed up to me yesterday and
asked
>"What is the opposite color of grey.?" I said I couldn't answer that
>because grey was not on the color wheel. Acting a bit impatient she
>repeated the same question a bit louder. so I replied "What ever
color you
>like" was my final answer.

Thanks for sharing. This student sounds creative. This is an
interesting question, and given the pressure of the classroom, I think
you gave some good responses. The question might be a good one to post
on the classroom wall.

In an earlier message I mentioned that my third grade granddaughter
asked me how to make red. I should have explained this more. When I
asked her more about it, I soon learned that she was wondering how they
manufacture red pigment (not how mix it from other colors). Of course I
did not realize this immediately. However, being an old art teacher, I
have worked hard to train myself not to immediately give children an
expert answer. I soon learned that she knew that red was a primary
color, but she was honestly wondering how the primary colors are
actually made (which would be a great extra credit project for a gifted
student, but that is another topic).

STUDENT QUESTIONS IN ART CLASS
Student questions often present teachable moments, but they catch me
off guard unless I work at my own response habits. It is amazing to me
how variable different art teachers are in this regard. For me, my
habit of being an expert has been extremely hard to overcome.

With the benefit of reflection, what would be some additional good ways
that might work to handle the "opposite of grey" question? Are there
special ways for us to think that inform how we respond to student
questions?

MY SECRET SPY MISSION ASSIGNMENT
For many years I was teaching art majors a course in how to teach art.
When they taught practice art lessons I noticed how much they loved
being art experts in front of younger students. I wondered how this was
influencing the younger students. I needed a way to raise the awareness
of this for the college students.

When they had their field work observing an art teacher, I decided that
their first observation assignment would be to keep a SECRET TALLY of
how the art teacher responded to student questions. They found that
many art teachers came across as "art experts" and answered nearly every
question in a fairly knowing way. Some even answered before they were
asked. Other teachers were especially good at getting students to
experiment to find their own solutions. Sometimes art teachers just
asked the student an open question. This reassured the questioning
student that this artwork should be based on the student's own choices.

I gave this undercover assignment, not because I hoped to change what
the experienced teachers were doing, but because I found that it was one
of best ways to get our INTERN teachers to reinforce and/or rethink what
they had learned about how to teach art (generally from their own former
art teachers).

TO THINK ABOUT

Was it ethical for me to ask my students to be educational spies? How
did your college prof teach you to observe other art teachers? Did you
have to critique them, or were you encourage to imitate them?

On a recent trip to London, I saw security cameras everywhere. I had
to ask myself, "What would a camera in my classrooms reveal to me about
my responses to student questions?"

For more ideas about classroom questions, see this page (recently
edited and revised).
http://www.bartelart.com/arted/questions.html

Marvin

Marvin Bartel, Ed.D., Professor of Art Emeritus
Goshen College, 1700 South Main, Goshen IN 46526
studio phone: 574-533-0171??
http://www.bartelart.com
http://www.goshen.edu/art/ed/art-ed-links.html
"You can't never know how to do it before you never did it before."
... a kindergarten boy working with clay for the first time.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Looking for Heiroglyph Sheet
From: SUSAN STEVENS <suestevens@rogers.com>
Date: Fri, 19 May 2006 09:01:26 -0400 (EDT)
X-Message-Number: 2

Hi everyone!
I am on a mission to find a specific Heiroglyph sheet.
 I have many different alphebets (but always looking
for new ones)....the one I'm looking for is actually
not an alphebet. There seems to be more than one page
(maybe two or three?)- but I only have one page, and a
bad copy at that.

The page is made up of a series of boxes (like bricks)
that are seperated by dashed lines (------). The top
left box is "GEB", and the bottom right box is
"YESTERDAY". Some of the other boxes include
heiroglyphs for "MAGICAL POWERS", "MIGHTLY", PROTECT",
and "STRENGTH".

I seem to be missing at least the first portion of the
alphebet!

I would love to get new copies of these sheets. I
have done extensive searches on the internet and in
books looking for this but have not found it yet. I
would be excited for a digital verson (scanned) or via
snail mail.

I will even trade copies of the alphebets that I have!

More than likely this was in some teaching book that
is no longer produced.

Please e-mail me if you have any leads to this
mystery!
Sue Stevens
suestevens@rogers.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: inquiry-based instruction
From: "Sears, Ellen" <ELLEN.SEARS@Anchorage.kyschools.us>
Date: Fri, 19 May 2006 10:08:31 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Marvin and all,

I have enjoyed the recent discussions on reinventing the color wheel.
=20

Marvin, I especially enjoyed the Albers quote you shared. If anyone
has
a chance to participate in actual inquiry based PD - it can be an eye
opener. =20

Last summer I attended an 'inquiry summit' at the Science center here
in
town. It was a week long PD based on the training from the
Exploratorium.

We played 'students' and learned about magnets. The entire week. We
had some whole class questions posed, which generated lists of
questions, they were sorted and we chose which one we wanted to
investigate - a couple of days of investigations and hands-on...
student
designed. My husband and I try to use inquiry based instruction as
much
as we can in our classrooms, but I never really reach the full stage
with my schedule.

We had some background knowledge before we went in, but it was neat to
see middle and high school science teachers amazed that they 'learned'
the expected outcomes even without being told what they were going to
learn. The 'teachers' had listed the content on chart paper before
we
even began on Monday - but we didn't know what was on the list - by
Friday when we listed what we learned - the lists matched.

=20

Guided questions, careful planning, materials and supplies... this is
what the teacher brought to the lesson. It is well orchestrated, and
there are several levels of inquiry instruction.

The difference between 'I taught' and 'they learned' -=20

If you ever get the chance to attend something like this - I would
recommend it -=20

Ellen

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Looking for Heiroglyph Sheet
From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 19 May 2006 08:40:29 -0600
X-Message-Number: 4

I assume you are referring to "Egyptian hieroglyphs". Of course it is
=20=

not an
alphabet as we are accustom to. Rather it is a picture language. It
=20
always
bothered me when other teachers would provide students with
translation pages where a specific Egyptian hieroglyph represented a
letter in English. They had students translate their names into =20
Egyptian,
as if this had and validity. I tried to steer kids right so they at
=20
least knew
there was no direct relationship between the languages.

I did develop a design lesson where students took English letters and
designed them to look like Egyptian hieroglyphs. Horace the hawk
might be turned into an "H" and a serpent might develop into an "S".
Each student designed a different letter.

Many teachers, with the best of intentions, fill students heads with
a host of misconceptions. I'm sure your lessons based on world
languages do nothing of the sort. We oftened copied Chinese
Calligraphy. When a touring troop of Chinese acrobats were
able to read the posters we put up, my students felt very proud.

Good luck in locating your missing hieroglyphs.
                                                Woody

On May 19, 2006, at 7:01 AM, SUSAN STEVENS wrote:

> Hi everyone!
> I am on a mission to find a specific Heiroglyph sheet.
> I have many different alphebets (but always looking
> for new ones)....the one I'm looking for is actually
> not an alphebet. There seems to be more than one page
> (maybe two or three?)- but I only have one page, and a
> bad copy at that.
>
> The page is made up of a series of boxes (like bricks)
> that are seperated by dashed lines (------). The top
> left box is "GEB", and the bottom right box is
> "YESTERDAY". Some of the other boxes include
> heiroglyphs for "MAGICAL POWERS", "MIGHTLY", PROTECT",
> and "STRENGTH".
>
> I seem to be missing at least the first portion of the
> alphebet!

Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
         mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net

35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703

=93The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
of your artwork that soars.=94 from: =93Art & Fear=94

Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
http://www.taospaint.com/DancePics/Triplets.html
My newest watercolors:
http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Recent.html

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: ambigrams
From: "Karen Chilman" <kchilman@scsd2.k12.in.us>
Date: Fri, 19 May 2006 10:44:12 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

Someone was asking about ambigrams a couple of days ago.

There is a book called WORDPLAY written by John Langdon with a
foreword
by Dan Brown.

It is informative and fun! I find these amazing! John Langdon did
the
ambigrams for The Da Vinci Code.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Looking for Heiroglyph Sheet
From: SUSAN STEVENS <suestevens@rogers.com>
Date: Fri, 19 May 2006 10:53:26 -0400 (EDT)
X-Message-Number: 6

Yes, Egyptian Hieroglyhs - sorry -should have
specified that.

Part of the reason why I am searching for this 'chart'
is that it contains items that are words rather than
'letters'.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: ambigrams
From: "Rebecca Burch" <mamallama@gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 19 May 2006 11:00:56 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7

Thanks! I just ordered that book! Good to hear someone else has used
it and thinks it's worthwhile. :)

Becky

On 5/19/06, Karen Chilman <kchilman@scsd2.k12.in.us> wrote:
> Someone was asking about ambigrams a couple of days ago.
>
> There is a book called WORDPLAY written by John Langdon with a
foreword
> by Dan Brown.
>
> It is informative and fun! I find these amazing! John Langdon did
the
> ambigrams for The Da Vinci Code.
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Hatsheput: From Queen to Pharaoh (slide show of images)
From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 19 May 2006 11:50:32 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

Dear Art Educators,

This was listed in Scout Report (copyright 2006
http://scout.wisc.edu/)

11. Hatsheput: From Queen to Pharaoh [Real Player]
http://www.metmuseum.org/special/Hatshepsut/pharaoh_more.asp

Rather than mounting an online exhibition to accompany Hatsheput: From
Quee=
n
to Pharaoh, the Metropolitan Museum has chosen instead to provide a
series
of auxiliary features on its Web site. For example, there is an
information
page, which explains that Hatshepsut, who ruled Egypt for 20 years
(ca.
1473-1458 B.C.), was the first important female ruler known to history.
A
special audio feature narrated by actor Sam Waterston can be listened
to as
a podcast, downloadable MP3 file, or 12-minute streaming audio. There
is
also a 19-image slide show that includes sculpted portraits of
Hatshepsut,
jewelry, vases, as well as chairs and other household items. Finally,
there
are links with ordering information for the exhibition catalog and
other
exhibition-related items from the Museum store.
-----------------------------------------

Here is the link to the main page:
http://www.metmuseum.org/special/se_event.asp?OccurrenceId=3D{92C8F718-137B=

-4AE6-9FAA-C8DA6CCE72CC}

There are some great images in the slide show - including some nice
effigy vessels (to inspire a lesson). You will need to allow pop ups
to see the slide show.

Enjoy.

Judy Decker
Incredible Art Department
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
Incredible Art Resources
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: teaching grades k-12
From: "Miriam Tobola" <Miriam.Tobola@sendit.nodak.edu>
Date: Fri, 19 May 2006 13:32:21 -0500 (CDT)
X-Message-Number: 9

Just a note from someone who has taught k-12 art for the past 8
years...it's awesome! Yes, it takes quite a bit of planning but it you
plan ahead and keep yourself organized there are tons of rewards!

Currently my schedule is 3 HS electives, one HS required, one MS
required
and one elem. every day. The elementary are split so that every class
get
to have art one period every other week for one semester. It's not
much,
but it's the best we can do at this time.

I love being able to build skills from one year to the next all the
way
through. It's such a joy to watch how the kids develop every year. And
I
get to know the kids so well over the years. Each year at graduation I
feel like these are my own children going out into the world!

Miriam Tobola
K-12 Art
Northern Cass School
Hunter, North Dakota

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: NAEA Release - Art Education: The Development of Public
Policy
From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 19 May 2006 14:39:08 -0400
X-Message-Number: 10

Dear Art Educators,

Some of you have asked about history of Art Education in the past.....

NAEA Releases New Resource
Art Education: The Development of Public Policy
By Charles Dorn

Art Education: The Development of Public Policy provides a
socio-political analysis of American K-12 art education policy from
1850 to the beginning of the twenty-first century. It seeks to
acquaint the reader with effects of government and foundation policy
interventions on the curriculum of K-12 art schooling, the influences
of these policies on how we view art and artists, and how art
educators are governed by the policymaking process.

Historically the book provides a 50-year overview of art education
curriculum reform from a policy perspective through the identification
of various federal and private efforts to influence the K-12 art
curriculum, the policy windows which provided the political
opportunities to initiate sometimes unwanted curricular changes and
the special interests outside the field who have sought to imitate
change.

The text presents various examples of public policy interventions,
monopolies, and rules initiated by governments and foundations in
order to insure compliance with conceptions of how the artist lost its
aura and how it was replaced by current policies advocating the art
student as a social change agent and social reconstructionist. Put at
risk by this process was the time honored idea of the progressives
that the child should be educated as the artist and that K-12 art
education is to foster creative learning.

Order No. 235
Art Education: The Development of Public Policy
228 pgs. {2005} ISBN 0-9715402-9-2
$35.00; Member Price $30.00

 WEB ORDER FORMS: http://www.naea-reston.org/publications
---------------------------------------------------------------------------=
---------------
You can sign up to receive NAEA e-News first hand by clicking link on
NAEA home page: http://www.naea-reston.org/

Judy Decker
Incredible Art Department
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
Incredible Art Resources
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: art show on line
From: "hollingsworth005" <hollingsworth005@bellsouth.net>
Date: Fri, 19 May 2006 22:53:48 -0400
X-Message-Number: 11

Hi all,
     WHew! Last Friday of the school year is over. I dressed up today-
fancy
skirt ,camisole, short little jacket-the works. As I was walking in,
everybody commented because the art teacher doesn't usually wear fancy
duds.
Dumb me, I said, well nobody is doing anything messy today so I think
its
safe. I forgot that during the 2nd grade class when we were looking at
everyone's digital portfolio, I had one last clay project that my two
special students were going to glaze. They came in late with their
shadow
and I was in hurry to get them started so I grabbed the jar of purple
glaze
and started to shake it and I still don't know what happened. The lid
didn't
come all the way off-but the glaze somehow shot out the side- all over
my
head, neck shoulders, ears, earrings, etc.. the floor and the table.
The
kids just gasped and poor Richard who is a screamer started screaming.
I had
3 little girls trying to wipe me down with paper towels and I just had
to
put my whole jacket in the sink. The class was great- they wiped up
the
floor and table and one little guy bravely took over the airliner and
started showing the next portfolio. It was actually pretty funny. The
kids
said, you told us to always hold the lid! I should have let them take
a
picture of me but I was dripping too much. I say all that to say
this,,( a
favorite phrase of one of my administrators) The year is almost over!!
I was
inspired by someone on the list to do an online artshow on my web page.
I
became very ambitious and decided to have all the students in the
school
posted ( the ones that have permission) Last week we "opened" and I
sent an
email announcement to all the schools and teachers in our district
(only 5
schools) and then sent flyers home with the students. So far, we have
had
some really positive comments. I hoped the parents would send some
specific
comments that I could share with the students since they were so
excited it.
Here is the link if you would like to visit. Enjoy! Jeryl in SC
http://www.anderson4.k12.sc.us/schools/les/art/art.htm

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: art show on line
From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 19 May 2006 23:09:10 -0600
X-Message-Number: 12

On May 19, 2006, at 8:53 PM, hollingsworth005 wrote:

> Hi all,
> WHew! Last Friday of the school year is over.
> Here is the link if you would like to visit. Enjoy! Jeryl in SC
> http://www.anderson4.k12.sc.us/schools/les/art/art.htm

Thank you for posting your kids art on line. It's great that you are
able to post photos of the students working in class. It makes
the process so meaningful. Enjoy your summer.
                                                Woody

Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
         mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net

35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703

=93The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
of your artwork that soars.=94 from: =93Art & Fear=94

Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
http://www.taospaint.com/DancePics/Triplets.html
My newest watercolors:
http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Recent.html

---
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