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RE:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: May 17, 2006

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From: carl toonz (carltoonz_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Thu May 18 2006 - 06:45:35 PDT


Teaching the "use of color"
Color theory is very pragmatic and can be confusing. As a professional
artist, as well as an elementary art teacher, I have a novel approach to the
problem. Color can come from light (where there is no white or black in the
spectrum of visible colors), Color can be pigmental, where colors are
created with dyes and tinting agents, and yes there is black and white
paint. (to prove this add black to white if you get pure grey(I prefer this
spelling) you have black if it looks purple or bluish it has those colors
added as well, and is not a true black). With watercolour (I prefer this
spelling), one should never teach students to use black or white, as wc is a
transparent media. It can all be very confusing, as there are as many right
answers as there are wrong, there are no absolutes. From my experience
students learn color usage best with hands on activities, mixing paint,
tearing color paper, etc.,
For the third grader who asks how to make "red", that is a real problem.
That student should have learned that in Kdg class. That school system is
completely out of touch with any concept of what an art curriculum is. I
hope this clears things up a little and doesn't "dirty the waters" any
further.
www.bobcarl-artist.com

>From: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest"
><teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>Reply-To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
><teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>To: "teacherartexchange digest recipients"
><teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>Subject: teacherartexchange digest: May 17, 2006
>Date: Thu, 18 May 2006 00:00:04 -0700
>
>TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Wednesday, May 17, 2006.
>
>1. Re: Calling all color theorists
>2. Looking for books on Contemporary Art
>3. Pinwheels for Peace
>4. RE: Calling all color theorists
>5. Re: Calling all color theorists
>6. Reinventing the (color) Wheel
>7. Public Domain Images for inspiration (Altered Books and more)
>8. Re: Calling all color theorists
>9. teaching grades k-12
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Calling all color theorists
>From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
>Date: Wed, 17 May 2006 07:06:14 -0600
>X-Message-Number: 1
>
>I suppose it's how you look at the question. Are we talking about =20
>light or pigment.
>In truth it's best to have students look at it from all angles. Of =20
>course, how old are the students ?
>I was first introduced to color theory in elementary school as white =20
>being the absents of color
>because we worked with pigments. I still look at it that way because =20
>I paint watercolor and
>create white by leaving the paper show. In Junior High I was =20
>introduced to the prism and
>the colors of light. I learned a new way to look at color. Later I =20
>learned about color theory in
>photography and printmaking. I can be confusing at first but I =20
>believe that middle school
>students should be able to comprehend the various aspects of color. =20
>Of course the real
>problem, as I discovered, is trying to explain it to other teachers =20
>who only knew what they
>read in the science book they were told to teach. That's why we need =20
>qualified teachers
>teaching each subject. I've had several teachers tell me I was
>teaching my students wrong or too often. My newest watercolor teacher =20=
>
>(she is 30) tells
>me to mix a "scanky wash" for my under painting. Putting pure colors =20
>next to this scanky
>or neutral makes the color pop. Every teacher has their unique =20
>approach. As long as it is
>correct and makes the point it's OK with me. I resist uniformity in =20
>teaching.
> =
>Woody
>
>On May 16, 2006, at 9:19 PM, Occasm@aol.com wrote:
>
> > Okay, we had some disagreement on terminalogy in our department =20
> > recently.
> > Would like a consensus from the list if you could.
> >
> > How do you define to your students what Black is and what White is.
> >
> > I have a teacher who tells kids White is the absence of color =20
> > (not sure
> > what she tells them black is though).
> > I've heard others call these neutrals along with grays and browns.
> > And I've heard still others say white is all the colors of the =20
> > spectrum
> > combined. This might be very scietific but it could be confusing to =20=
>
> > kids. I've
> > also heard that black described as the absence of color.
> >
> > How do you define black and white to your students if they ask you =20
> > whether
> > these are colors or not?
> >
> > thanks,
> > Mike Sacco
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
>35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
>in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
>http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
>Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
>Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703
>
>=93The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
>is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
>of your artwork that soars.=94 from: =93Art & Fear=94
>
>Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
>Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
>http://www.taospaint.com/DancePics/Triplets.html
>My newest watercolors:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Recent.html
>
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Looking for books on Contemporary Art
>From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
>Date: Wed, 17 May 2006 07:17:14 -0600
>X-Message-Number: 2
>
>I need some ideas (books) for explaining very modern abstract =20
>contemporary art to museum
>docents. Something not too dense or complex would be best. Also if =20
>anyone could suggest
>a novel which hits the topic I would appreciate that as well. We need =20=
>
>reading material to
>fit in with contemporary exhibits next year. As of yet I don't know =20
>the specific artists in the
>exhibits. We have a number of "older" docents who are resistant to =20
>more contemporary
>abstract work.
> Thanks, =
>Woody
>
>
>Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
>35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
>in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
>http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
>Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
>Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703
>
>=93The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
>is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
>of your artwork that soars.=94 from: =93Art & Fear=94
>
>Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
>Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
>http://www.taospaint.com/DancePics/Triplets.html
>My newest watercolors:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Recent.html
>
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Pinwheels for Peace
>From: Ann Ayers <art304@bellsouth.net>
>Date: Wed, 17 May 2006 09:20:35 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 3
>
>Just as a reminder - I know that you all are winding down but,
>Pinwheels for Peace is just gearing up! If you are going to
>participate this year, kindly register at the Pinwheels site http://
>www.pinwheelsforpeace.com (if you participated last year, please re-
>register).
>
>In advance, thanks!
>Ann
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: RE: Calling all color theorists
>From: "familyerickson" <familyerickson@cox.net>
>Date: Wed, 17 May 2006 08:27:43 -0500
>X-Message-Number: 4
>
>Woody,
>My favorite media (for my own painting) is watercolor.
>What is a skanky wash?
>Curiously,
>Cindy
>
>Woody wrote: <<<My newest watercolor teacher
>(she is 30) tells
>me to mix a "scanky wash" for my under painting. Putting pure colors
>next to this scanky
>or neutral makes the color pop.>>>>
>
>--
>No virus found in this outgoing message.
>Checked by AVG Free Edition.
>Version: 7.1.392 / Virus Database: 268.5.6/340 - Release Date: 5/15/2006
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Calling all color theorists
>From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
>Date: Wed, 17 May 2006 09:26:31 -0600
>X-Message-Number: 5
>
>I hope I spelled in right. A "Skanky Wash" is a netural color created =20=
>
>with complements
>used to fill in the dark and medium areas of a watercolor. Jae =20
>Drummond my instructor
>uses the term to describe her technique. Here are examples of Jae's =20
>watercolors.
>http://www.jkdrummond.com/portfolio.html
> Woody
>
>On May 17, 2006, at 7:27 AM, familyerickson wrote:
>
> > Woody,
> > My favorite media (for my own painting) is watercolor.
> > What is a skanky wash?
> > Curiously,
> > Cindy
> >
> > Woody wrote: <<<My newest watercolor teacher
> > (she is 30) tells
> > me to mix a "scanky wash" for my under painting. Putting pure colors
> > next to this scanky
> > or neutral makes the color pop.>>>>
> >
> > --=20
> > No virus found in this outgoing message.
> > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
> > Version: 7.1.392 / Virus Database: 268.5.6/340 - Release Date: =20
> > 5/15/2006
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
>35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
>in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
>http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
>Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
>Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703
>
>=93The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
>is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
>of your artwork that soars.=94 from: =93Art & Fear=94
>
>Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
>Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
>http://www.taospaint.com/DancePics/Triplets.html
>My newest watercolors:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Recent.html
>
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Reinventing the (color) Wheel
>From: Marvin Bartel <marvinpb@goshen.edu>
>Date: Wed, 17 May 2006 13:29:48 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 6
>
>Recently, my third grade granddaughter phoned to ask me, "What colors do
>you use to mix red?" I told her that this was a very good question. We had
>an excellent discussion about experiments she could do to try to find the
>solution. If you think it is not possible to make red from other colors,
>consider your ink jet printer. Does it come with red ink? How does it
>print red?
>
>Joseph Albers, Bauhaus teacher and Yale art professor, wrote the book on
>color theory. His square paintings were color studies. He also had some
>great insights about learning. In March, I had the pleasure of seeing an
>exhibit of Albers' work at the Tate Modern in London. The Tate had these
>quotations from Albers on the wall.
>
>QUOTATIONS FROM JOSEPH ALBERS from the Tate Modern
>
>"The school should nurture the individual possibly without disturbing
>personal development -- School should allow a lot to be learned, that is
>to say that it should teach little -- Learning is better than teaching
>because it is more intense: the more is being taught, the less can be
>learned -- In the end all education is self-education -- All knowledge,
>theoretical or practical is deadwood when it does not result in a positive
>attitude proved by action"
>
>TWO WAYS TO TEACH COLOR
>
>I. LEARN FROM THE EXPERTS method (following experts)
>Teaching color theory and principles can be taught as a series of expert
>ideas to look at and memorize. In this method the teacher displays the
>color wheel and explains it. The teacher explains the established color
>terminology and phenomena and students are required to memorize as much as
>possible. Students look at a famous artwork that employs color theory and
>review their learning by painting something that uses the same color
>theory.
>
>II. REINVENT THE WHEEL method (active learning)
>In this method of learning color theory the teacher does NOT tell or show
>students anything about the rules. The color wheel is NOT shown. The
>teacher has students do experiments to discover things until the color
>wheel is invented by them. The color principles are developed out of their
>comparisons, experiments, and observations. In the Reinventing the Wheel
>method they experiment, and the teacher helps by asking questions to focus
>and keep the experimentation on track. Students learn how to question, how
>to experiment, how to observe, how to feel, how to think, how to invent,
>how to be creative, how to be independent, and how to make their own
>choices. These are the kinds of thinking, feeling, and expression done by
>most great artists, scientists, poets, composers, and so on.
>
>In this method, it is essential for the teacher to be sure that students
>review and summarize their discoveries and inventions so that they realize
>and appreciate what they have learned. In this method students are solving
>visual puzzles. In this method they are and making discoveries and
>inventions about depth, flatness, feelings, relationships, observations,
>and meanings related to color. The experimentation is followed by
>paintings based on memory, imagination, or observation, that make
>observational, depth/flatness, emotional, and/or symbolic use of the color
>principles that they discovered through experimentation. By prohibiting
>the use of unmixed paint students continue to make discoveries as they
>paint.
>
>What follows are a few COLOR THEORY ideas for the teacher
>to KEEP SECRET until after the students discover them.
>
>Color studies can involve the SYMBOLIC meanings of color (green with envy,
>yellow mean coward, etc.) & PSYCOLOGICAL effects of color (some color
>schemes are depressing and others are exciting---a warm painted room can
>allow lower thermostat settings in winter--saving energy, but a dentist
>office should probably be painted in a cool color).
>
>Black, white, and greys are considered NEUTRALS, but brown is an orange
>(secondary color) with a small amount of neutral (black) added. A dark
>brown is a SHADE of orange. Pink is a TINT of red and maroon is a SHADE of
>red.
>
>All pigments are quite variable and can each be described in terms of HUE
>(name of color), SATURATION (intensity), TEMPERATURE warm or cool), and
>VALUE (tone). Some are PRIMARY, but others are just as important.
>Primaries in light are not the same as in pigments.
>
>Color experiments and assignments are often related to studies in the
>illusion of depth (warm, intense, and lighter colors generally come
>forward, but this effect can be canceled in certain situations).
>
>Some very interesting experiments and assignments can be assigned by asking
>students to make simultaneous similarities and opposites together. For
>example green and red may be adjusted until they are identical in value,
>but much different in temperature, saturation, and hue.
>
>There are many ways to teach and many ways to learn, but as Albers said,
>"In the end all education is self-education."
>
>Marvin Bartel, Ed.D., Professor of Art Emeritus
>Goshen College, 1700 South Main, Goshen IN 46526
>studio phone: 574-533-0171
>http://www.bartelart.com
>http://www.goshen.edu/art/ed/art-ed-links.html
>"You can't never know how to do it before you never did it before." ... a
>kindergarten boy working with clay for the first time.
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Public Domain Images for inspiration (Altered Books and more)
>From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
>Date: Wed, 17 May 2006 13:38:44 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 7
>
>Dear Art Educators and Altered Book Enthusiasts
>
>Many of you have probably already seen Karen's Whimsy Web site:
>http://karenswhimsy.com/
>
>Karen Hatzigeorgiou creates original contemporary art in the form of
>altered books and collage art. A must see site (especially the
>Reliquaries)
>
>Karen contacted me to add links to her Public Domain images
>http://karenswhimsy.com/public-domain-images/
>Public Domain Images - Scans of engravings and other
>artwork from a personal collection of old books, magazines, and post
>cards. Updated regularly.
>
>I will be adding links on the pages for Clip Art and Public Domain
>images - as well as on the Altered Book Lesson Plan.
>
>Regards,
>
>Judy Decker
>Incredible Art Department
>http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
>Incredible Art Resources
>http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Calling all color theorists
>From: Betty B <bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net>
>Date: Wed, 17 May 2006 12:43:30 -0700 (PDT)
>X-Message-Number: 8
>
>I have finally got our science teacher to start
>reinforcing for me that what they learn about mixing
>spectral light is not applicable necessarily to paint!
>
>
>Furthermore, I tell them that there is no actual black
>paint, that paint is all made from "something" that
>looks near to black, like carbon, and mixing all 3
>primaries is never ever going to make black, and that
>white paint is usually made from zinc or titanium.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>--- Occasm@aol.com wrote:
>
> > Okay, we had some disagreement on terminalogy in our
> > department recently.
> > Would like a consensus from the list if you could.
> >
> > How do you define to your students what Black is and
> > what White is.
> >
> > I have a teacher who tells kids White is the
> > absence of color (not sure
> > what she tells them black is though).
> > I've heard others call these neutrals along with
> > grays and browns.
> > And I've heard still others say white is all the
> > colors of the spectrum
> > combined. This might be very scietific but it could
> > be confusing to kids. I've
> > also heard that black described as the absence of
> > color.
> >
> > How do you define black and white to your students
> > if they ask you whether
> > these are colors or not?
> >
> > thanks,
> > Mike Sacco
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> >
>http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: teaching grades k-12
>From: marcia <marciadotcom@yahoo.com>
>Date: Wed, 17 May 2006 20:49:27 -0700 (PDT)
>X-Message-Number: 9
>
>Does anyone here teach K-12 art for their whole
>district? Is it totally crazy? Do you have enough
>time to get everything done? I'm just curious because
>there's a job opening near me and I think it might be
>fun to teach a variety of grade levels, but at the
>same time it might be scary since I've never taught
>high school.
>
>__________________________________________________
>Do You Yahoo!?
>Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
>http://mail.yahoo.com
>
>
>
>---
>
>END OF DIGEST
>
>---
>carltoonz@hotmail.com
>leave-teacherartexchange-73144W@lists.pub.getty.edu

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