Note: To protect the privacy of our members, e-mail addresses have been removed from the archived messages. As a result, some links may be broken.

Find Lesson Plans on getty.edu! GettyGames

RE:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: May 04, 2006

---------

From: carl toonz (carltoonz_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Fri May 05 2006 - 05:08:55 PDT


OLD CRAYONS.... I'd like to hear more ideas....In past years, teaching
elementary art, I have put the old crayons into sandwich sized bags and
distributed them to needy children at my school. They seem to enjoy this
gift and can use them during the summer. I only give them usable crayons,
1/2 stick or so. They are also great for special needs pre-schoolers and
others that like to have "their own" set of crayons. This year most of my
students come from middle, upper-middle and higher class families, so I will
ask around for ways to donate them in the community. BC
PS: Check out my personal webpage at: www.bobcarl-artist.com

>From: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest"
><teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>Reply-To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
><teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>To: "teacherartexchange digest recipients"
><teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>Subject: teacherartexchange digest: May 04, 2006
>Date: Fri, 05 May 2006 00:00:03 -0800
>
>TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Thursday, May 04, 2006.
>
>1. RE: teacherartexchange digest: May 03, 2006
>2. Old crayons
>3. Re: Old crayons
>4. Re: Old crayons
>5. adjusting a slab roller
>6. Re: adjusting a slab roller
>7. Re: adjusting a slab roller
>8. Re: adjusting a slab roller
>9. Re: adjusting a slab roller
>10. Re: adjusting a slab roller
>11. your own sketchbook
>12. my show
>13. Re: my show
>14. RE: my show
>15. New Release from NAEA - plus job openings
>16. Re: your own sketchbook
>17. Re: your own sketchbook
>18. Re: your own sketchbook
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: RE: teacherartexchange digest: May 03, 2006
>From: "clarkda" <clarkda@glasscity.net>
>Date: Thu, 4 May 2006 08:08:14 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 1
>
>APOLOGY (dysgraphia)
>
> For anyone who will please accept my apology, and forgive my curt
>statements of May 1, I would appreciate your time.
>
> I was entirely too rash in my statements regarding dysgraphia. I
>realize that there is a huge range of disabilities. I appreciate all of
>your different ideas and approaches for this difficulty. I realize that
>any one of your students can be at any given time very different from my
>son
>and his "particular" set of disabilities. Maybe "he" did well with my
>approach, but maybe your students would not.
>
> I appreciate everything and everyone on this list. I appreciate all
>of your efforts for your students. If my son had had teachers like you
>all
>are, maybe I wouldn't have had to take him out of the system he was in.
>Again, please accept my apology.
>
>Donna in Ohio
>
>
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
>[mailto:teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu]
>Sent: Thursday, May 04, 2006 4:01 AM
>To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
>Subject: teacherartexchange digest: May 03, 2006
>
>TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Wednesday, May 03, 2006.
>
>1. RE: teacherartexchange digest: May 02, 2006
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: RE: teacherartexchange digest: May 02, 2006
>From: "Vikki Hillis" <ullasina@cablelynx.com>
>Date: Wed, 3 May 2006 11:59:29 -0500
>X-Message-Number: 1
>
>Re: Dysgraphia . . . . a different interface, a world seen differently. . .
>Photography may also offer some powerful and empowering opportunities for
>your "dysgraphic" student. If your department or the special ed department
>can make a digital camera and some photo editing software available to this
>student you may open a whole "new" world of communication for him. (and for
>his teachers/others to better understand his interface with the world). Set
>him loose with a camera and an understanding of framing. Devise lessons
>that
>focus first on the line and shape then move toward textures and qualities
>of
>light and dark. e.g. go photograph things with straight lines, then curving
>lines, repeating lines, don't focus on whole images or representations,
>just
>the parts that make up the whole. As I am writing this I have just taken a
>series of snapshots (in my mind) of the table lamp on my desk and met all
>the criteria. After he gains his initial experiences with photography, have
>him explore the works of other photographers and also painters, then repeat
>the first assignments to see how his approach is changed by experience and
>exposure to different ways of "framing" and "composing" the world.
>Introduce
>him to various simple photo editing processes and then add "paint" and
>drawing type layers. My bias and love of "handedness" would also direct him
>to build line drawings (aka Cy Twombly) in and around his images, extending
>and playing with the photo elements and drawn elements and ideas associated
>with picture plane, frame, edge, bounded and unbounded limits, etc. Scale
>also seems to be an important factor, how does the quality and control of
>his marks/mark making change when constrained 8 by 10 versus 20 by 20 and
>greater. I'd be curious (really curious) to know how many opportunities he
>has had to work big. Is there a proportional element to dysgraphia? Does
>dysgraphia increase in direct proportion to the scale and limitations of
>lined workbooks and handwriting guides? Think interface, the privileged
>norms (modern, western, aesthetic) and then think and challenge him (and
>his
>teachers/others) to think about his unique way of moving kinesthetically,
>visually, bodily through and about the world.
>Although I have no literal experience to support the above ideas, I have
>had
>a few dysgraphic students in arts based social studies classroom and their
>interface was different. Images and the freedom from the need to create
>formalized representations of the world liberated their thinking spirit bit
>by bit. Wish I'd had thought camera back then. If you can't get a digital
>camera for him to use, mention the possibilities to his special ed folks
>and
>maybe it can be provided or iep'd.
>What a wonderful opportunity to world make with this young person.
>Best to you.
>Vikki Hillis
>Hot Springs, Arkansas
>UALR, liberal studies and philosophy.
>
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
>[mailto:teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu]
>Sent: Wednesday, May 03, 2006 3:00 AM
>To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
>Subject: teacherartexchange digest: May 02, 2006
>
>
>TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Tuesday, May 02, 2006.
>
>1. RE: teacherartexchange digest: May 01, 2006
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: RE: teacherartexchange digest: May 01, 2006
>From: "clarkda" <clarkda@glasscity.net>
>Date: Tue, 2 May 2006 07:44:49 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 1
>
>Dysgraphia
>
>Again, in regards to dysgraphia, when teaching my son (who is presently a
>senior at OSU in Ohio, in architecture) art at high school level, ---I
>required very disciplined drawings, with all the rules and tools, etc, to
>teach him perspective (when he was in high school). He is 26 now and is
>carrying way over a 3.0 in college. Teach it!!! Teach it!!! They are
>bright and they want to learn!!!
>They don't want it dumbed down. They want it the way everyone else is
>getting it. You'll be pleasantly surprised at what they CAN do. He got
>the technological help later. Now, he makes 3D models, hand drawings, AND
>computer aided designs. BUT, the technology came later, in college, AFTER
>he had learned the real deal. TEACH IT.
>
>Donna in Ohio
>
>
>
>
>Subject: Re: Dysgraphia
>From: "Linda Watson" <lsw@cox-internet.com>
>Date: Mon, 01 May 2006 20:03:11 -0500
>X-Message-Number: 8
>
>I have a student with dysgraphia. He cannot draw realistically but does
>very interesting work similar to Cy Twombly. Also, he discover he can
>make very detailed clay sculptures. He works hard and that is what I care
>about!
>
>Linda Watson
>
>On Wed, 12 Apr 2006 14:56:40 -0500, Jenny Watlington
><pritchard1@verizon.net> wrote:
>
> > Does anyone at the high school level have advice for working with a
> > student with dysrgraphia? I have a special ed dept who would like a
> > 10th grader with this conditon to be in my class. He is extremely
> > bright but his handwriting is really chicken scratch. They asked if he
> > could do adaptive related work on the computer.
> >
> > I would like to have him if I can figure out how to make it work.
> >
> > Has anyone used a tablet and a paint program to to do anything
> > related to shading or for painting alternatives or perspective
> > drawing? If so I would need to put in a request for assitive
> > technology soon.
> >
> >
> > Peter Pritchard
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
>
>
>
>---
>
>END OF DIGEST
>
>---
>clarkda@glasscity.net
>leave-teacherartexchange-73144W@lists.pub.getty.edu
>
>
>
>
>
>
>---
>
>END OF DIGEST
>
>---
>ullasina@cablelynx.com
>leave-teacherartexchange-73144W@lists.pub.getty.edu
>
>
>
>
>---
>
>END OF DIGEST
>
>---
>clarkda@glasscity.net
>leave-teacherartexchange-73144W@lists.pub.getty.edu
>
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Old crayons
>From: "Carolyn Karn" <Ckarn@marlboro.k12.sc.us>
>Date: Thu, 04 May 2006 09:20:58 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 2
>
> Does anyone have any good projects to use up old crayons? I teach
>fir=
>st and second grade so a lot of projects that involve melting are not
>suita=
>ble. I like taking the paper off and putting them through a mini-glue
>gun=
>, but the logistics just don't work for a whole class to do that because
> there are only two outlets for everything in the classroom. =
>
>Carol in SC
>
>
>
>
>NOTICE: This communication including attachments is being sent by or on
>behalf of an employee of Marlboro County School District and may contain
>confidential or legally privileged information. The sender does not
>intend to waive any privilege, including the work-product and/or
>attorney-client privilege, that may attach to this communication. If you
>are not the intended recipient, you are not authorized to intercept,
>read, print, retain, copy, forward, or disseminate this communication. =
>If you have received this communication in error, please notify the
>sender immediately by email and delete this communication and all
>copies.
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Old crayons
>From: "bkramer(POP)" <bkramer@srvusd.k12.ca.us>
>Date: Thu, 04 May 2006 07:40:56 -0700
>X-Message-Number: 3
>
>on 5/4/06 6:20 AM, Carolyn Karn at Ckarn@marlboro.k12.sc.us wrote:
>
> > Does anyone have any good projects to use up old crayons?...I
> > like taking the paper off and putting them through a mini-glue gun, but
>the
> > logistics just don't work for a whole class....
> > Carol in SC
>*****************************
>
>Oooooou, can you please share how you put crayons in a mini-glue gun and
>what you do with that? Eagerly anticipating....Bunki
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Old crayons
>From: "Rebecca Burch" <mamallama@gmail.com>
>Date: Thu, 4 May 2006 10:55:10 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 4
>
>Yes! That sounds fascinating!
>
>You can shave the old crayons and put the shavings between pieces of
>wax paper and iron them (do this before hand) and then have the
>students cut shapes out of them for mobiles or suncatchers. This is
>best for younger kids, but I've found that middle schoolers love the
>swirly, translucent patterns, too.
>
>
>
>On 5/4/06, bkramer(POP) <bkramer@srvusd.k12.ca.us> wrote:
> > on 5/4/06 6:20 AM, Carolyn Karn at Ckarn@marlboro.k12.sc.us wrote:
> >
> > > Does anyone have any good projects to use up old crayons?...I
> > > like taking the paper off and putting them through a mini-glue gun,
>but=
> the
> > > logistics just don't work for a whole class....
> > > Carol in SC
> > *****************************
> >
> > Oooooou, can you please share how you put crayons in a mini-glue gun and
> > what you do with that? Eagerly anticipating....Bunki
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: adjusting a slab roller
>From: "Karen Chilman" <kchilman@scsd2.k12.in.us>
>Date: Thu, 04 May 2006 11:31:44 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 5
>
>
>Anybody know how to adjust a Brent brand slab roller. The slab are too
>thin.
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: adjusting a slab roller
>From: Jayna Huffines <jayna_99@yahoo.com>
>Date: Thu, 4 May 2006 08:59:21 -0700 (PDT)
>X-Message-Number: 6
>
>Pull back the top cloths, and pull out as many
>masonite boards as you need to to get the clay the
>thickness you want. Mine had probably 4 boards under
>the cloth.
>
>--- Karen Chilman <kchilman@scsd2.k12.in.us> wrote:
>
> >
> > Anybody know how to adjust a Brent brand slab
> > roller. The slab are too
> > thin.
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> >
>http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
>
>
>Jayna
>
><a href="http://www.myspace.com/netinemmy" target="_blank"><img
>src="http://x.myspace.com/images/Promo/myspace_4.jpg" border="0"><br><img
>src="http://www.myspace.com/images/no_pic.gif" border="0"><br><font
>size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Check me
>out!</font></a>
>
>
>
>
>__________________________________________________
>Do You Yahoo!?
>Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
>http://mail.yahoo.com
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: adjusting a slab roller
>From: Marvin Bartel <marvinpb@goshen.edu>
>Date: Thu, 4 May 2006 12:06:44 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 7
>
> >Anybody know how to adjust a Brent brand slab roller. The slab are too
> >thin.
>
>In the bed of the slab roller (under the top layer) there are removable
>sheets of hardboard. Take out as many as you want to get the thickness you
>want.
>Marvin
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: adjusting a slab roller
>From: Marvin Bartel <marvinpb@goshen.edu>
>Date: Thu, 4 May 2006 12:06:52 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 8
>
> >Anybody know how to adjust a Brent brand slab roller. The slab are too
> >thin.
> >
> >---
> >To unsubscribe go to
> >http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: adjusting a slab roller
>From: Louise Neal <tamaru@epix.net>
>Date: Thu, 4 May 2006 12:09:12 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 9
>
>If it like what I have, you can remove the masonite boards that are
>underneath the canvas. Louise
>On May 4, 2006, at 11:31 AM, Karen Chilman wrote:
>
> >
> > Anybody know how to adjust a Brent brand slab roller. The slab are too
> > thin.
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: adjusting a slab roller
>From: Marvin Bartel <marvinpb@goshen.edu>
>Date: Thu, 4 May 2006 12:09:20 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 10
>
> >Anybody know how to adjust a Brent brand slab roller. The slab are too
> >thin.
>
>Under the top layer in the bed of the slab roller you will find extra
>layers of hardboard that can be slipped out to increase the slab thickness.
>Marvin
>
>
>
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: your own sketchbook
>From: Betty B <bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net>
>Date: Thu, 4 May 2006 12:14:06 -0700 (PDT)
>X-Message-Number: 11
>
>I'm making a sketchbook for my summer trip to Italy
>(one backpack and purse), and it will be an assortment
>of toned Canson Mi Tients and Fabriano, and some
>Arches 88 and Indian Village Handmade from Daniel
>Smith (which I love) for watercolor.
>
>I ve decided against taking my travel watercolor pack
>in favor of a select few Aqua Monolith (no wood)
>watercolor pencils and a sharpener.
>
>So now for the book. It is starting to occur to me
>that I might be happier with a packet of loose sheets
>and a small clipboard, so I can carry just a few
>sheets out with me every day, and bind them together
>when I get home. I might make the clipboard out of
>bookbinding board, or a piece of shina plywood which
>is very light and strong. I could bring a big rubber
>band for the bottom
>
>Have any of you ever tried the "loose sheets &
>clipboard" thing on your travels??
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: my show
>From: Betty B <bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net>
>Date: Thu, 4 May 2006 12:19:05 -0700 (PDT)
>X-Message-Number: 12
>
>I'm having a small show of small (6 x 6) woodcuts.
>There are 20 in all, but I don't have them all up on
>the page yet. They are printed on Kitakata and
>Mulberry papers, with chine colle of some very cool
>Asian papers I found at Hollanders in Ann Arbor over
>Spring Break.
>
>http://www.geocities.com/bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net/
>
>It is at the Ponca City Art Center in Ponca City, OK,
>which is a beautiful old "Osage Oil" mansion, and the
>opening is Sunday. It was a lot of work/fun to get 20
>blocks carved to my liking.
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: my show
>From: "Sidnie Miller" <SMILLER@elko.k12.nv.us>
>Date: Thu, 04 May 2006 12:46:44 -0700
>X-Message-Number: 13
>
>Congrats Betty---I wish I could take a printmaking class from you..Sid
>
> >>> bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net 5/4/2006 12:19 pm >>>
>I'm having a small show of small (6 x 6) woodcuts.
>There are 20 in all, but I don't have them all up on
>the page yet. They are printed on Kitakata and
>Mulberry papers, with chine colle of some very cool
>Asian papers I found at Hollanders in Ann Arbor over
>Spring Break.
>
>http://www.geocities.com/bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net/
>
>It is at the Ponca City Art Center in Ponca City, OK,
>which is a beautiful old "Osage Oil" mansion, and the
>opening is Sunday. It was a lot of work/fun to get 20
>blocks carved to my liking.
>
>---
>To unsubscribe go to
>http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: RE: my show
>From: "Hillmer, Jan" <HillmJan@Berkeleyprep.org>
>Date: Thu, 4 May 2006 16:48:52 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 14
>
>Betty, these are beautiful! Thank you for sharing them. I'm hoping
>your show is very well attended.
>
>Jan
>
>
>I'm having a small show of small (6 x 6) woodcuts.
>There are 20 in all, but I don't have them all up on
>the page yet. They are printed on Kitakata and
>Mulberry papers, with chine colle of some very cool
>Asian papers I found at Hollanders in Ann Arbor over
>Spring Break.=20
>
>http://www.geocities.com/bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net/
>
>It is at the Ponca City Art Center in Ponca City, OK,
>which is a beautiful old "Osage Oil" mansion, and the
>opening is Sunday. It was a lot of work/fun to get 20
>blocks carved to my liking.=20
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: New Release from NAEA - plus job openings
>From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
>Date: Thu, 4 May 2006 17:11:44 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 15
>
>Dear Art Educators,
>
>NAEA Releases New Resource - details on how to order may be bound on
>NAEA Web site.
>
>WORK, PEDAGOGY AND CHANGE:
>FOUNDATIONS FOR THE ART TEACHER EDUCATOR
>
>By Lynn Beudert
>
>This book acknowledges the complexity and dignity involved in the work
>of art teacher education within higher education today. Implicit
>within its pages is the notion of change and its affects on the daily
>working lives of educators involved in preparing art teachers. Art
>teacher educators' narratives and voices, interwoven within the text,
>shed light on the challenges and joys =97 intellectual, institutional,
>curricular, pedagogical, emotional, moral and artistic =97 that affect
>the professional and personal growth of college and university faculty
>members, graduate students and K-12 practitioners, as they teach and
>work with pre-service teachers. This book offers aspiring, beginning
>and experienced art educators shared glimpses into a range of
>authentic and individual art teacher education life-worlds and
>institutions, as well as possibilities for practice and
>self-reflective inquiry.
>
>Order No. 265
>Work, Pedagogy and Change:
>Foundations for the Art Teacher Educator
>180 pages (2006) 1-890160-34-2
>$25.00; Members $20.00
>
>WEB ORDER FORMS: http://www.naea-reston.org/publications
>--------------------------------------
>Job Openings - Selected States file has been updated:
>http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/news/jobs.htm
>
>This file is updated nearly every week - check back often.
>
>You can sign up on NAEA web site to receive the list first hand. You
>do not need to be a member of NAEA to receive the e-news.
>
>Judy Decker
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: your own sketchbook
>From: trish ackerman <dacke8175@yahoo.com>
>Date: Thu, 4 May 2006 15:06:34 -0700 (PDT)
>X-Message-Number: 16
>
>Hi Betty,
>Ive been thinking of the same thing and thought of
>using a premade post type album and cutting my own
>paper to fit with holes punched to go through the
>posts.
>
>What size album/paper were you thinking of?
>
>
>Trish Ackerman
>Core Knowledge Charter School
>Middle School Art,Parker, Colorado
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>__________________________________________________
>Do You Yahoo!?
>Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
>http://mail.yahoo.com
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: your own sketchbook
>From: Maggie White <mwhiteaz@cybertrails.com>
>Date: Thu, 04 May 2006 17:33:47 -0700
>X-Message-Number: 17
>
>I like your idea of taking loose pages and binding them later. You're
>taking some really luscious papers! My only suggestion would be to take
>several rubber bands, as you are bound to lose some along the way. Have
>you thought about how you will protect the whole lot while in transit so
>the pages don't get bent or torn?
>
>Maggie
>
>Betty B wrote:
>
> ><snip>
> >So now for the book. It is starting to occur to me
> >that I might be happier with a packet of loose sheets
> >and a small clipboard, so I can carry just a few
> >sheets out with me every day, and bind them together
> >when I get home. I might make the clipboard out of
> >bookbinding board, or a piece of shina plywood which
> >is very light and strong. I could bring a big rubber
> >band for the bottom
> >
> >Have any of you ever tried the "loose sheets &
> >clipboard" thing on your travels??
> >
> >
> >
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: your own sketchbook
>From: Betty B <bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net>
>Date: Thu, 4 May 2006 18:43:26 -0700 (PDT)
>X-Message-Number: 18
>
>I'm thinking about fairly small pieces that I can
>carry in my daybag, and I don't see myself having
>hours and hours in any one spot, so probably around 6
>x 8.
>
>I am designing and making my own "easy on the back"
>bag, and will make a little space just for it. In my
>actual backpack I am going to make a portfolo of
>foamcor to carry papers and protect any art/ephemera I
>might buy at the street markets.
>
>Yes, multiple rubber bands is a good plan. I found a
>source online for the clip alone, but also wonder if I
>should just bring a few buffalo clips - those large
>black kind. keep it simple
>
>Betty
>
>
>
>---
>
>END OF DIGEST
>
>---
>carltoonz@hotmail.com
>leave-teacherartexchange-73144W@lists.pub.getty.edu

_________________________________________________________________
Express yourself instantly with MSN Messenger! Download today - it's FREE!
http://messenger.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200471ave/direct/01/

---
To unsubscribe go to 
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html