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Re:[teacherartexchange] drawing ideas and plaster sculpture

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From: Terry Marney (terrylou63_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Tue May 24 2005 - 03:40:08 PDT


Hi! I'm new to the list. I'm a .5 art teacher in MA and I would love to hear more ideas for drawing classes. I've found that my 7th & 8th graders, as frustrated as they may get, really love the concrete drawing directions of how to draw a face in proportion....how to measure using a pencil, how to look at a still life and create a composition. It helps their pictures to get better and they see that. I haven't tried the plaster carving yet, but it sounds like fun...can't wait to try that! If using the small milk cartons, it would take less time than a larger sculpture. Working with that size, with middle school kids, it might be fun to research bugs and carve different types of insects. Any other ideas?
     PS - I'm looking for full-time in Southeastern MA....middle or high school....if anyone hears of an upcoming opening?
Terry

TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu> wrote:
TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Monday, May 23, 2005.

1. Re: Welcome back, Reatha!
2. Re: Glass marbles in the kiln
3. Re: looking for student evaluation questions for public school/high school
4. Re: looking for student evaluation questions for public school/high school
5. Re: Glass marbles in the kiln
6. CNN + Autism special
7. Re: teacherartexchange digest: May 22, 2005
8. RE: Interest in Drawing Ideas page? - Idea using masking tape
9. RE: clay glue
10. Altered Book "Tip In" being planned for summer
11. RE: Glass marbles in the kiln and drape technique
12. Tell your students about this kids' site
13. Plaster Sculputre - - Wet or dry
14. Whyville link added to IAD - Sites for kids
15. Re: Glass marbles in the kiln
16. GREAT SITE - Altered Books Tips - ATCs - Craft How to's More!
17. Re: GREAT SITE - Altered Books Tips - ATCs - Craft How to's More!
18. Re: Plaster Sculputre - - Wet or dry
19. Re: GREAT SITE - Altered Books Tips - ATCs - Craft How t...
20. RE: Plaster Sculputre - - Wet or dry
21. Re: Plaster Sculputre - - Wet or dry
22. yearbook alternatives
23. Re: Glass marbles in the kiln and drape technique
24. Re: Glass marbles in the kiln
25. Docent Training and Thoughts on Retirement
26. Re: yearbook alternatives
27. Autograph books
28. Re: Glass marbles in the kiln
29. Re: Glass marbles in the kiln

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Subject: Re: Welcome back, Reatha!
From: RWilk85411@aol.com
Date: Mon, 23 May 2005 05:31:01 EDT
X-Message-Number: 1

-------------------------------1116840661
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Thank you Maggie. Yes many fond memories. And I am reminded of a discussion
I would like to get started. We have been experimenting with fusing and
slumping glass. How many on the list are working with glass in this way?

-------------------------------1116840661
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bottomMargin=3D7 leftMargin=3D7 topMargin=3D7 rightMargin=3D7>e_document=20
face=3DArial color=3D#000000 size=3D2>
Thank you Maggie. Yes many fond memories. And I am reminded of a discus=
sion=20
I would like to get started. We have been experimenting with fusing and slum=
ping=20
glass. How many on the list are working with glass in this=20
way?

-------------------------------1116840661--

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Subject: Re: Glass marbles in the kiln
From: ARTNSOUL12@aol.com
Date: Mon, 23 May 2005 07:22:15 EDT
X-Message-Number: 2

-------------------------------1116847335
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In a message dated 05/23/2005 5:35:57 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
RWilk85411@aol.com writes:

We have been experimenting with fusing and slumping glass. How many on the
list are working with glass in this way?

This year my 4th graders formed ceramic dishes using a slab of clay and
plaster drape molds that they each made by pouring plaster into a stryofoam bowl.
When they glazed them, I let them choose glass marbles to put in the bottom
of the dish. WOW! What fun discoveries they made! The mables melted and
were an absolutely magnificent addition to their finished bowl. They used
gloss glazes all over their bowls first, then placed the marbles inside. The
red marbles turned bright yellow-orange and the clear with colors swirled
interestingly. The process of ceramics is always a surprise in the finished
product and this was the ultimate fun for them! When I ran out of the round
marbles I went to a big crafts store in my area that had big bags of glass
"stones" (used in flower arrangements) that have flat bottoms and we used those with
ecellent results, as well. On sale they were a very good price for 5lbs.
If you decide to try this, I suggest that you wash each dish before the kids
handle them because their is a "glass dust" left from the firing that have
little sharp pieces. I fired the pieces at cone 06.
Susan on Long Island

-------------------------------1116847335
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Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Arial"=20
bottomMargin=3D7 leftMargin=3D7 topMargin=3D7 rightMargin=3D7>e_document=20
face=3DArial color=3D#000000 size=3D2>

In a message dated 05/23/2005 5:35:57 AM Eastern Daylight Time,=20
RWilk85411@aol.com writes:

style=3D"PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: blue 2px solid"><=
FONT=20
style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" face=3DArial color=3D#000000 size=
=3D2>We have=20
been experimenting with fusing and slumping glass. How many on the list ar=
e=20
working with glass in this way?

This year my 4th graders formed ceramic dishes using a slab of cla=
y=20
and plaster drape molds that they each made by pouring plaster into a=20
stryofoam bowl. When they glazed them, I let them choose glass marbles=
to=20
put in the bottom of the dish. WOW! What fun discoveries they=20
made! The mables melted and were an absolutely magnificent addition to=
=20
their finished bowl. They used gloss glazes all over their bowls=20
first, then placed the marbles inside. The red marbles turned bri=
ght=20
yellow-orange and the clear with colors swirled interestingly. Th=
e=20
process of ceramics is always a surprise in the finished product and this wa=
s=20
the ultimate fun for them! When I ran out of the round marbles&nb=
sp;I=20
went to a big crafts store in my area that had big bags of glass "stones" (u=
sed=20
in flower arrangements) that have flat bottoms and we used those with ecelle=
nt=20
results, as well. On sale they were a very good price for 5lbs. =20=
If=20
you decide to try this, I suggest that you wash each dish before the ki=
ds=20
handle them because their is a "glass dust" left from the firing that h=
ave=20
little sharp pieces. I fired the pieces at cone 06.

Susan on Long Island

-------------------------------1116847335--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: looking for student evaluation questions for public school/high school
From: lia johnson
Date: Mon, 23 May 2005 06:53:46 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

Thanks all for the helpful suggestions. I will pass this information on. =
lia

On 5/22/05, Woody Duncan wrote:
> Lia,
> I agree with Michael on including comments on the favorite
> project. But knowing that they may not remember some, I
> suggest you provide a list of assignments and have them
> rank them. This gives them a review and starts the mind
> remembering. Then have them respond in detail on a
> favorite. Keep it short and word the questions so as
> to require thought rather than yes or no answers.
> Good Luck, Woody
>=20
> Lia wrote:
>=20
> >> I have a student teaching HS who wants to give out an
> >> evaluation/survey of
> >> how she is doing to her HS students. I know some teachers routinely
> >> do this. Anyone have questions they might want to share that brought
> >> meaninful results?
>=20
> M. Austin replied:
>=20
> > Some questions I always ask my students:
> >
> > What was your favorite project we did this year? Why?
> > What was your least favorite project? Why?
> > Did you feel that your teacher cares about you as a person?
> > Did you feel that you received adequate help on your projects as needed=
?
> > Did you feel that your teacher acted in a professional manner?
> > Would you take another course from this teacher?
> > Did you feel that your teacher was knowledgable about art?
> > Was your teacher adequately prepared?
> >
> > Most of these questions are on our professional evaluations, given to u=
s
> > by our administrators. If I am going to be evaluated by an administrato=
r
> > who is in my room for 10 minutes at a time, 2-3 times a year, then I
> > like to back it up by having the student's assessment. Surprisingly,
> > many of the answers are often the same. :-)
>=20
>=20
> --
> Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>=20
> 35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
> in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
> http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
> Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
> Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703
>=20
> "The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
> is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
> of your artwork that soars." from: "Art & Fear"
>=20
> Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
> http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
> Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
> http://www.taospaint.com/Spring05/Photos.html
> Your Invite to Woody's Exhibit:
> http://www.taospaint.com/ArtShow/Invite.html
>=20
>=20
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: looking for student evaluation questions for public school/high school
From: Marvin Bartel
Date: Mon, 23 May 2005 08:02:15 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

It is found that teachers who ask for assessment at mid-term will get
stronger student assessments at the end of term.

For mid-term, I ask something like this:

1. What are the assignments and things the teacher has done so far
in this class that you think have worked best for your learning
and/or to challenge you to be more creative in this class?

2. What are your suggestions to make things better during the rest
of this class so you would learn more and/or be more creative?

At end of term, I would ask:

1. List something(s) in this class, if any, that helped you become
more creative and confident?

2. List the assignment(s) in this class on which you chose to work
the hardest?

2a. Why did you choose to work harder on this (these) assignment(s)?

3. List things, if any, in this class that you found too boring. Explain.

4. List the things in this class, if any, that were frustrating
because they were too challenging. Explain.

5. List the most important things you learned about art and/or about
yourself in this class that you did not know before this class?

6. Answer this if you wish. Would you recommend this class to your
friends? ___ yes ___ no Why?

Marvin

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Glass marbles in the kiln
From: jillart1@aol.com
Date: Mon, 23 May 2005 09:53:58 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

----------MailBlocks_8C72DB6005AACFD_CF8_28F08_FWM-R40.sysops.aol.com
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

I just allowed my fourth grade students to add marbles to the bottom of large pinch pots. I fired at 04. They came out beautiful. The kids were so excited to see the finished product! I know they'll remember this for a long time.
Jill in Colorado

-----Original Message-----
From: ARTNSOUL12@aol.com
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
Sent: Mon, 23 May 2005 07:22:15 EDT
Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] Glass marbles in the kiln

In a message dated 05/23/2005 5:35:57 AM Eastern Daylight Time, RWilk85411@aol.com writes:
We have been experimenting with fusing and slumping glass. How many on the list are working with glass in this way?
This year my 4th graders formed ceramic dishes using a slab of clay and plaster drape molds that they each made by pouring plaster into a stryofoam bowl. When they glazed them, I let them choose glass marbles to put in the bottom of the dish. WOW! What fun discoveries they made! The mables melted and were an absolutely magnificent addition to their finished bowl. They used gloss glazes all over their bowls first, then placed the marbles inside. The red marbles turned bright yellow-orange and the clear with colors swirled interestingly. The process of ceramics is always a surprise in the finished product and this was the ultimate fun for them! When I ran out of the round marbles I went to a big crafts store in my area that had big bags of glass "stones" (used in flower arrangements) that have flat bottoms and we used those with ecellent results, as well. On sale they were a very good price for 5lbs. If you decide to try this, I suggest that you wash each dish before the kids handle
 them because their is a "glass dust" left from the firing that have little sharp pieces. I fired the pieces at cone 06.
Susan on Long Island
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To unsubscribe go to
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Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii"

I just allowed my fourth grade students to add marbles to the bottom of large pinch pots. I fired at 04. They came out beautiful. The kids were so excited to see the finished product! I know they'll remember this for a long time.

Jill in Colorado
 
-----Original Message-----
From: ARTNSOUL12@aol.com
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Sent: Mon, 23 May 2005 07:22:15 EDT
Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] Glass marbles in the kiln

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In a message dated 05/23/2005 5:35:57 AM Eastern Daylight Time, RWilk85411@aol.com writes:

We have been experimenting with fusing and slumping glass. How many on the list are working with glass in this way?

This year my 4th graders formed ceramic dishes using a slab of clay and plaster drape molds that they each made by pouring plaster into a stryofoam bowl. When they glazed them, I let them choose glass marbles to put in the bottom of the dish. WOW! What fun discoveries they made! The mables melted and were an absolutely magnificent addition to their finished bowl. They used gloss glazes all over their bowls first, then placed the marbles inside. The red marbles turned bright yellow-orange and the clear with colors swirled interestingly. The process of ceramics is always a surprise in the finished product and this was the ultimate fun for them! When I ran out of the round marbles I went to a big crafts store in my area that had big bags of glass "stones" (used in flower arrangements) that have flat bottoms and we used those with ecellent results, as well. On sale they were a very good price for 5lbs. If you decide to try this, I suggest that you wash each dish before the kids
 handle them because their is a "glass dust" left from the firing that have little sharp pieces. I fired the pieces at cone 06.

Susan on Long Island
---
To unsubscribe go to
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html

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----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: CNN + Autism special
From: "Sears, Ellen"
Date: Mon, 23 May 2005 10:36:11 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

in case you are interested - this special was on over the weekend - is on
again today and next weekend -
Ellen

Sue Rubin's story is very interesting - to read some of her writings:

http://soeweb.syr.edu/thefci/4-1rub2.htm

http://soeweb.syr.edu/thefci/6-1rub.htm

and here is the CNN educators guide - you can see it will be on this
afternoon -
here is the educators page -
http://cnnstudentnews.cnn.com/2005/fyi/05/18/cnnpce.autism/

Autism is a World Set your VCR to record the CNN Presents Classroom
Edition: Autism is a World when it airs commercial-free on Monday, May 23,
2005 from 4:00-- 5:00 a.m. ET on CNN. Program Overview For years, Sue Rubin
says she was "her own worst nightmare." Sue has autism, and until age 13,
she was unable to communicate or control her unusual behavior. Now 26, Sue
has become a disabled-rights advocate and a college student with a top IQ.
In the Academy Award-nominated documentary Autism is a World, filmmaker
Gerry Wurzburg and CNN Presents take a rare look at autism through the words
of a young woman who lives with it. Grade Levels: 9-12, college Subject
Areas: Health, Social Studies, Technology, Current Issues Objectives: The
CNN Presents Classroom Edition: Autism is a World and its corresponding
discussion questions and activities challenge students to: Learn about the
symptoms, characteristics and differentiated diagnoses associated with
autism spectrum disorders (ASD); Identify traits that are common to all
autistic disorders; Examine different treatment approaches for ASD; Create
an informational brochure about ASD for parents and local mental health
providers.

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Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: May 22, 2005
From: K A
Date: Mon, 23 May 2005 07:53:12 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 7

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I'm in Arizona.

~ Kathleen

From:
RWilk85411@aol.comDate:Sun, 22 May 2005 08:12:05 EDT

Maggie, are you in Arizona?

"Art washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life."- Pablo Picasso

---------------------------------
Yahoo! Mail
Stay connected, organized, and protected. Take the tour
--0-1722642367-1116859992=:19107
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I'm in Arizona.

~ Kathleen

 

From:

RWilk85411@aol.com

Date:
Sun, 22 May 2005 08:12:05 EDT

 

=== message truncated ===

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