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Re: Project times - Balance is the key but how to achieve it is one of the BIG QUESTIONS!

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mcguffsilver_at_TeacherArtExchange
Date: Wed May 26 2004 - 15:17:19 PDT


Dear Sharon,
    Please tell me what program to open you attachments to. My computer really, really, really, wants to know. I was able to make out the information about the job announcement using microsoft word, but alot of other stuff was included. I did send my resume. Wish me luck.

Sincerely,

Ellen Silverman

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attached mail follows:


Jan,
 From reading the posts on this list for a lot of years I can comment
that many of the posts have been asking how to get students to the
point where they will continue working for extended periods. When you
change the activity within the project, as it appears that you do, they
can maintain interest. Several of my former students who are earning a
good living in the arts told me that one of the most valuable skills I
taught them in elementary and middle level was to work through the
blocks and stick to a project to completion. They discovered when they
arrived in art schools that there were many art students who struggled
with this and in their words, "gave them an advantage because they were
used to the difficulties of working to completion".

This is a skill that is essential to succeed in life in general and you
are teaching your students a very valuable skill.

Every once in a while I would slip a short project between that just
skimmed the surface so the students had a wide variety of experiences
and then follow up with another multilayered projects. Balance is the
key but how to achieve it is one of the BIG QUESTIONS! I tried to
schedule one complex multilayered project a marking period interspersed
with activities that provided immediate success.

Congratulate yourself that you have achieved a teaching strategy that
many teachers struggle with and that you are skilled at guiding your
students through complex projects.

Sharon ~ NJ

On Wednesday, May 26, 2004, at 07:55 AM, Hillmer, Jan wrote:
From: "Hillmer, Jan" <HillmJan@Berkeleyprep.org>

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