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Re: Questions about Art Ed

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From: knitzber (knitzber_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Wed May 05 2004 - 15:18:46 PDT


Standards are not standard if the precepts being taught are
based on a
relative response, nor are they viable if the teacher's
belief of a
student's ability level is factored in as a moderating
element in the
scoring. Of course, there are accomodations that are
mandated in
some circumstances that have to be addressed with special
needs
populations that may allow for substitutions of materials
and other
considerations to be utilized in order not to penalize a
student based
upon documented Individual Educational Plans (IEPs).

However, that being said, how the standard is delivered does
allow for
a variety of ability levels to come to the table initially
with increased
performance resulting from a higher level of understanding
and skill
acquisition that occurs through working on a series of
sequential tasks
that were consciously constructed to implement the entire
standard.
For example, if the initial task in a standard package
allows for the
accomplishment of a base level of understanding / skill
development of
the material being taught, that will enable the student to
move on with
greater success to the accomplishment of the 2nd, 3rd and
in some
cases, 4th task (I have seen 5 in some cases but that is
typically
excessive in a class that meets for less than a semester
where the
standard is not the entire curriculum of the course). It is
ultimately
about how you help a student to reach the highest level of
mastery of
the skills inherent in the standard that is most important,
not the
'dummying' or watering down of the skills / understanding
that is being
sought.

Kevan

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