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Re: N.C. teachers please respond

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From: Janice Keenan (jekteachme_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Thu May 16 2002 - 08:40:57 PDT


> Aghhhhh! No sooner had I written the list to boost how "nothing could
>be
>finer than doing national boards in North Carolina" than it was
>announced
>that NC may lose it's national board support.

We're having the same issues here in Florida..it is very frustrating!

  Jan in Miami

  ArtsEdNet Talk digest <artsednet@lists.getty.edu> wrote: ARTSEDNET Digest for Monday, May 13, 2002.

1. Re: 'Why art cannot be taught'
2. Re: flat files.....
3. Re: 'Why art cannot be taught'
4. Re: flat files.....
5. corrected URL for online learning opportunity this summer
6. Re: flat files.....
7. NC teachers- please respond
8. Re: How many more days/weeks?
9. Re: paper movies
10. Art lessons for Autistic Students
11. Re: Art lessons for Autistic Students
12. Baking Architecture Recipies
13. Re: Art on a cart(longish post)
14. RE: Baking Architecture Recipies
15. Re: RE: Question
16. Re: Baking Architecture Recipies
17. Re: Baking Architecture Recipies
18. sidewalk chalk - help?
19. Re: Art lessons for Autistic Students
20. =?ISO-8859-1?B?UmU6IHNpZGV3YWxrIGNoYWxrIMotIGhlbHA/?=
21. Re: sidewalk chalk - help?
22. Re: Baking Architecture Recipies
23. RE: Baking Architecture Recopies
24. interested in talking with anyone teaching art in a Muslim-- school environment
25. Re: Art lessons for Autistic Students
26. Re: 'Why art cannot be taught'
27. Beware this hoax!
28. Re: Art lessons for Autistic Students
29. Keeping clay wet over the summer
30. Re: Keeping clay wet over the summer
31. Re: Baking Architecture Recipies
32. Re: chicago rejuvenation! and evil ancient egypt
33. Re: Baking Architecture Recipes
34. Re: Baking Architecture Recopies
35. Re: flip cube pattern:susie
36. filing prints
37. Re: ms. mean
38. Re: Baking Architecture Recipies
39. Re: Art lessons for Autistic Students
40. Re: Art on a cart(longish post)
41. fourth grade demo lesson ideas
42. Re: Keeping clay wet over the summer

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Subject: Re: 'Why art cannot be taught'
From: Elizheisey@aol.com
Date: Mon, 13 May 2002 06:43:48 EDT
X-Message-Number: 1

'Why art cannot be taught' is the name of the book

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Subject: Re: flat files.....
From: linda eastman

Date: Mon, 13 May 2002 07:34:00 +0800
X-Message-Number: 2

on 5/13/02 1:10 PM, Bunki Kramer at bkramer@srvusd.k12.ca.us wrote:

> If you're interested in getting some flat files, you might try calling some
> architectural firms to see if they would have some old ones to donate. Or
> maybe call your community business group to pass the word along to it's
> members. It's worth the effort. Toodles....Bunki
>

right on, bunki. it is amazing what kinds of things are "out there" not
being used. i live in the detroit area and my district got a huge donation
of nearly new flat files from one of the auto companies and (gasp!!) turned
them down!!! this was before i had contacted the head of the warehouse to
inquire about them. as it turned out there were 2 in my building that were
full of classroom materials from the 1950s that (of course) no one was
using, so i cleaned them out and put them to great use.
another indispensible piece of "throw-away" equipment i use is the old
dry-mount press - the antique version of the laminating machine. i heat it
up and "iron" the kids' pictures in it. voila! no more wavy papers! i say
check around in the basement of your building or district warehouse and see
what's there that you can put to good use.

linda in rainy, rainy michigan where the grass is growing at the rate of
about 1" an hour.

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Subject: Re: 'Why art cannot be taught'
From: Ann Heineman
Date: Mon, 13 May 2002 07:44:36 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Hi Beth,

Who is the author, publisher, and what is the ISBN # ?

Thank you from,
Ann-on-y-mouse in Columbus,
who is so happy being back on line with you folks!
Check my new address.

on 5/13/02 6:43 AM, Elizheisey@aol.com at Elizheisey@aol.com wrote:

> 'Why art cannot be taught' is the name of the book

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Subject: Re: flat files.....
From: LMiller435@aol.com
Date: Mon, 13 May 2002 07:40:14 EDT
X-Message-Number: 4

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All this talk of flat files. I have a chance to move into an art room made
in heaven! A fabulous room. The retiring teacher has been trying to get me to
move to that school and room all year.

For various reasons I'm not going to move. In that room I would have room
for flat files or any other kind of storage. In the room I will keep for the
next 3 years and had for the last 26 years, there is no room for students,
much less flat files. Perhaps I will get the promised storage in the locker
room on the other side of the gym next year. I purchased large foam core for
folders two years ago when the room was promised, then. Otherwise, the
posters are stuck leaning up against the wall at one end of the room. If I
could get them out of the room I would have the space for one more table so
the kids wouldn't have to sit 9 at a table meant for 6. I am saving all the
ideas.
Leslie

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All this talk of flat files. I have a chance to move into an art room made in heaven! A fabulous room. The retiring teacher has been trying to get me to move to that school and room all year.

For various reasons I'm not going to move. In that room I would have room for flat files or any other kind of storage. In the room I will keep for the next 3 years and had for the last 26 years, there is no room for students, much less flat files. Perhaps I will get the promised storage in the locker room on the other side of the gym next year. I purchased large foam core for folders two years ago when the room was promised, then. Otherwise, the posters are stuck leaning up against the wall at one end of the room. If I could get them out of the room I would have the space for one more table so the kids wouldn't have to sit 9 at a table meant for 6. I am saving all the ideas.

Leslie

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Subject: corrected URL for online learning opportunity this summer
From: Kevan Nitzberg
Date: Mon, 13 May 2002 06:36:50 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

Craig Roland is offering an online course that he developed through Davis
Publications this summer. You can access information about the course at:
http://www.davis-art.com/learning

The course can be taken for CEUs, grad credit or just for personal gain. I
learned about the class when I went to his workshop session on Online
Learning at NAEA in Miami.

Kevan

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Subject: Re: flat files.....
From: LMiller435@aol.com
Date: Mon, 13 May 2002 07:44:49 EDT
X-Message-Number: 6

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In a message dated 05/13/2002 7:36:04 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
lindacharlie@wwnet.net writes:

> right on, bunki. it is amazing what kinds of things are "out there" not
> being used. i live in the detroit area and my district got a huge donation
> of nearly new flat files from one of the auto companies and (gasp!!) turned
> them down!!! this was before i had contacted the head of the warehouse to
> inquire about them. as it turned out there were 2 in my building that were
>

Isn't it amazing how school districts throw things away and turn away
donations before asking the troops if they are needed?

I get disgusted sometimes.

Leslie in Framingham where they are the masters of throwaway important things.

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In a message dated 05/13/2002 7:36:04 AM Eastern Daylight Time, lindacharlie@wwnet.net writes:

right on, bunki. it is amazing what kinds of things are "out there" not

being used. i live in the detroit area and my district got a huge donation

of nearly new flat files from one of the auto companies and (gasp!!) turned

them down!!! this was before i had contacted the head of the warehouse to

inquire about them. as it turned out there were 2 in my building that were

full

Isn't it amazing how school districts throw things away and turn away donations before asking the troops if they are needed?

I get disgusted sometimes.

Leslie in Framingham where they are the masters of throwaway important things.

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Subject: NC teachers- please respond
From: "Michelle H. Harrell"
Date: Mon, 13 May 2002 10:39:03 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7

Aghhhhh! No sooner had I written the list to boost how "nothing could be
finer than doing national boards in North Carolina" than it was announced
that NC may lose it's national board support. We need as many teachers in
NC and national board supporters to write, call, and e-mail as soon as
possible. Because NC has led the nation in national board support, this
could have a ripple effect on every other state that was considering
offering support in the future. Michelle Harrell

PLEASE READ AND RESPOND!

Because of the budget crisis, the Education Appropriations Committees of the
NC House and Senate are looking at cutting the National Board line item.
This would mean that there would be no more money to pay for candidates. It
would also mean the end of the program as we know it in our state. We would
certainly no longer lead the nation in the number of NBCTs, and we would
know longer be able to provide our teachers with this phenomenal
professional development.

NOW IS THE TIME FOR YOU TO CALL YOUR LEGISLATORS. Please don't think that
someone else will do it or that you'll do it later or that you don't know
what to say. Tell them the difference the NBC process makes in improving
teaching. Tell them the difference it has made in your students' learning.
Tell them that it has kept you in teaching. Tell them the things you always
tell me about the difference it makes. You are much more powerful than I am
in telling these stories.

You may contact your legislators by calling 919-733-4111 or by writing to
The Honorable ______, NC General Assembly, Raleigh 27603. If you don't know
the name of your representative and senator, contact NCAE or AFT or another
professional organization or look on the General Assembly website.

Please share this message with candidates and other NBCTs. Please do not
discourage candidates from applying. The more applications we have, the
better. I believe that our friends in the General Assembly want to do all
they can to keep this program.

It is particulary important that you contact members of the leadership.
They are: Senators Basnight, Dalton, Lucas, Lee, Plyler, and Garrou, and
Representatives Easterling, Gene Rogers, Boyd-McIntire, Black, and Redwine.
Gov. Easley and Lt. Governor, who support this program, should also hear
from you. Handwritten letters are especially effective with legislators.
Please let me know what kind of response you get.

Thank you for all you do for our kids and our profession. Thank you, too,
for your leadership in this effort.

_________________________________________________________________
Chat with friends online, try MSN Messenger: http://messenger.msn.com

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Subject: Re: How many more days/weeks?
From: Maggie White
Date: Mon, 13 May 2002 08:19:28 -0700
X-Message-Number: 8

Thank you, Ken. Although I've been having a really bad year this year,
I still enjoy my teaching time; it's the one good part of life these
days. It was getting depressing reading those posts and I was deleting
most of them without reading them.

Maggie

Bicyclken@aol.com wrote:
>
> I know this will sound weird but we seem to look like people who don't
> like our profession. This reoccurring theme of I can't wait until
> it's over and I have only "X" days until the pain is gone is
> disturbing. I thought this list was full of dedicated teachers who
> liked teaching art and started the year with neat ideas and cool
> solutions to last years problems.

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Subject: Re: paper movies
From: Maggie White
Date: Mon, 13 May 2002 08:40:22 -0700
X-Message-Number: 9

"Sears, Ellen" wrote:
>
> I almost hate to say this because I keep sharing 'Martha' stuff and sound
> like a groupie - but in the recent issue of Martha Stewart Kids - there is
> a section on paper movies and 'how tos'... flip books, zoetropes,
> phenakistiscopes and thaumatropes...
> Ellen
>

These are great end-of-the-semester (or year) projects when you have to
keep them busy for a few days. Two books that are useful: Paper Movie
Machines by Budd Wentz, published by troubadour press (lower case); and
Making "Movies" Without a Camera by Lafe Locke, published by Betterway
Books. I gave a workshop at NAEA a few years ago where we made several
of these gadgets.

Maggie

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Subject: Art lessons for Autistic Students
From: "Sheri A. Woodard"
Date: Mon, 13 May 2002 12:40:20 -0500
X-Message-Number: 10

Hi all
This fall I will be teaching a couple of classes of young autistic students.
I was wondering if anyone had some ideas/resources for projects. These
students are K-2nd grade.
Thanks
Sheri

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Subject: Re: Art lessons for Autistic Students
From: Maggie White
Date: Mon, 13 May 2002 10:16:32 -0700
X-Message-Number: 11

Get ahold of the book Exceptional Children, Exceptiona Art by David
Henley, published by Davis. It has good info on autistic students and
will help you understand what sorts of activities are appropriate for
them. It is not a book of lesson plans, per se.

Maggie

"Sheri A. Woodard" wrote:
>
> Hi all
> This fall I will be teaching a couple of classes of young autistic students.
> I was wondering if anyone had some ideas/resources for projects. These
> students are K-2nd grade.
> Thanks

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Subject: Baking Architecture Recipies
From: Mark Alexander
Date: Mon, 13 May 2002 10:20:38 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 12

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Does anyone have any ideas combining architecture and baking?

My 8th graders need to complete an architecture unit, to meet the curriculum. I've introduced them to the three architecture orders of the golden age of Greece, and we've done a photo trip through our town looking at the Greek revival arcitecture, and we've discussed how the ancient Greek architecture has influenced our local architecture.

A large group of 8th graders wants to do a "Art Cooking" project (we have a full size kitchen range in the artroom, and a small fridge) I thought it might be fun to combine cooking with architecture.

Ideas I have not yet boiled down: architectural details in gingerbread, gingerbread houses, etc?

Any other ideas?

Any recipies?

Thanks in advance, Mark (who can cook, but isn't a baker)

---------------------------------
Do You Yahoo!?
LAUNCH - Your Yahoo! Music Experience
--0-655886930-1021310438=:93759
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Does anyone have any ideas combining architecture and baking?

My 8th graders need to complete an architecture unit, to meet the curriculum. I've introduced them to the three architecture orders of the golden age of Greece, and we've done a photo trip through our town looking at the Greek revival arcitecture, and we've discussed how the ancient Greek architecture has influenced our local architecture.

A large group of 8th graders wants to do a "Art Cooking" project (we have a full size kitchen range in the artroom, and a small fridge) I thought it might be fun to combine cooking with architecture.

Ideas I have not yet boiled down: architectural details in gingerbread, gingerbread houses, etc?

Any other ideas?

Any recipies?

Thanks in advance, Mark (who can cook, but isn't a baker)

 

---------------------------------
Do You Yahoo!?

LAUNCH - Your Yahoo! Music Experience
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Subject: Re: Art on a cart(longish post)
From: "Ann Carolan"
Date: Mon, 13 May 2002 13:14:32 -0400
X-Message-Number: 13

You could push 4 desks together for painting, much easier grouped than
individual. I use individual paint boxes, brushes, and those small cups
they use in restaurants for mayo, etc. for water which is poured from a
recycled gallon container. 3 students help pass things out.

I have sadly given up on ceramics because the teachers were always running
to the principal, with exaggerated stories about how messy the room was
and rather than constantly dealing with their hassles, I now do little in
the way of messy projects. They have won. They want me to have a room but
it seems to be a low priority on the Board.

acarolan@inland.k12.mi.us

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Subject: RE: Baking Architecture Recipies
From: Carrie Crawford
Date: Mon, 13 May 2002 12:24:55 -0500
X-Message-Number: 14

This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not understand
this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.

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What about something with dry spaghetti, creating a structure somehow and
watching what happens with the introduction of heat/water/steam?

Carrie Crawford-Dickerson
Tour Programs Assistant
The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
Kansas City, MO 64111
(816) 751-1330
ccrawford@nelson-atkins.org

-----Original Message-----
From: Mark Alexander [mailto:markcalexander@yahoo.com]
Sent: Monday, May 13, 2002 12:21 PM
To: ArtsEdNet Talk
Subject: Baking Architecture Recipies

Does anyone have any ideas combining architecture and baking?

My 8th graders need to complete an architecture unit, to meet the
curriculum. I've introduced them to the three architecture orders of the
golden age of Greece, and we've done a photo trip through our town looking
at the Greek revival arcitecture, and we've discussed how the ancient Greek
architecture has influenced our local architecture.

A large group of 8th graders wants to do a "Art Cooking" project (we have a
full size kitchen range in the artroom, and a small fridge) I thought it
might be fun to combine cooking with architecture.

Ideas I have not yet boiled down: architectural details in gingerbread,
gingerbread houses, etc?

Any other ideas?

Any recipies?

Thanks in advance, Mark (who can cook, but isn't a baker)

_____

Do You Yahoo!?
LAUNCH - Your Yahoo!
leave-artsednet-7600Y@lists.getty.edu

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