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Lesson Plans


Re: Printmaking with innercity kids

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Ruth Voyles (RVoyles)
Mon, 29 Mar 1999 09:26:38 -0500


There are so many ways to do printmaking with children, without using linoleum and sharp tools. Some things that we have done:

glue prints (elmer's glue on a cardboard or matboard backing).

styrofoam meat trays (or styrofoam sheets specifically designed for printing from art supply catalogs)
These can be used for both relief and intaglio printing methods

nature prints: leaves, grasses, flowers, etc can be inked and printed.

stencil printing (along the same lines as screen printing)
lay stencil down on paper and run brayer over it.

screen printing: using inexspensive speedball kits, or you can make your own

string prints- glue string onto cardboard

collage prints-collage chipboard and other materials (textural materials like potato bags, plastic doilies, textured wallpaper samples, etc. I love to take the children on a texture hunt)

foam printing...if you have a recycled materials outlet (in Ann Arbor, Mich it is called the Scrap Box). They handle recycleables from industry. I purchase foam there that has an adhesive backing. It is easy to print, and takes ink very well. We also use it for "marker prints." Which give the children a way to do polychrome printing.

plasticene clay can be rolled flat and "carved" and printed, or you can use the clay in an additive process to create a printing plate...

I really love doing printmaking with children, there are just so many ways you can do it.

Hope this helps


************************************
Ruth Voyles
Family Center and
Early Childhood Education Supervisor
Toledo Museum of Art
P.O. Box 1013
Toledo, Ohio 43697
Phone: (419)255-8000 X236
Fax: (419)255-5638
E-mail:
rvoyles
rvoyles
************************************

>>> <AbeleSmith> 03/26 7:10 PM >>>

Unless you have teeny tiny elementary classes, I'd stay away from lino cuts
and equipment. I'd do collographs, using poster board or innertubes, or cut
up rubber balls, or found flat objects. I'll be eager to hear what other
people recommend....

Terry in Garland, Texas