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Lesson Plans


Re: artsednet-digest V2 #1312

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
chandra grace cousins (chandra)
Sat, 20 Mar 1999 16:45:12 -0500 (EST)


If you're getting too much mail, why don't you just get the digest version,
and then you don't have to read the stuff you don't want. Pesonally I like
to know what's going on at all levels, often the high school stuff is
adaptable for the secondary grades.

At 05:13 AM 3/20/99 -0800, you wrote:
>
>artsednet-digest Saturday, March 20 1999 Volume 02 : Number 1312
>
>
>
>This edition includes :
>Elementary Art
>Re: Tolstoy and Public Art
>Re: Meaning
>Re: Re: Deb and Mother Nature
>Re:Time travel
>NAEA presentation you won't want to miss!
>Re: Elementary Art
>Re: Elementary Art
>Re: time travel 2
>Re: Re: Elementary Art
>RE: Elementary Art
>Re: Meaning and Artist's Intention
>Re: Elementary Art
>Re: Meaning
>Re: Elementary Art
>Re: Elementary Art
>Re: Elementary Art
>Music and Art
>size/meaning/intention
>Thank you
>Re: Elementary Art
>Painting
>Re: elementary art
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Date: Fri, 19 Mar 99 16:29:26 -0500
>From: Art <t35839.us>
>Subject: Elementary Art
>
>I saw a list a few weeks ago, asking about Elem. only list serves. Could
>we not ask the Getty folks to set up two different serves - one for elem.
>and one for secondary? Does anyone know who to contact? Personally,
>I've got about 60 messages I've not been able to read this week, and some
>don't pertaint to my kids on the elem. level. It would cut down on all
>of our mail bags if we split it. Let me, and I guess Getty, know what
>you think.
>
>Artfully yours,
>A. Zincone
>McGee's Xroads Elem.
>Johnston Co. NC
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 12:37:18 -0800 (PST)
>From: "R. Moore" <ronmoore>
>Subject: Re: Tolstoy and Public Art
>
>I found Brenda Jones's remarks about her experience with Freshmen and
>with upperclassmen regarding the accessibility (or intelligibility) of
>public artworks fascinating! These two groups of students really had
>quite different takes on the role of public artworks in relation the
>viewing public. Tolstoy was, of course, a notorious populist. You may
>recall his concluding remark in WAR AND PEACE that "everything truly great
>is truly simple." He believed deeply that the mission of art was to reach
>everyone and draw us all together in a collective experience. But, not
>everyone agrees with this notion of art's objective today. It is very
>interesting that a large number of Brenda's younger students DO think it
>is important for art to connect with a broad base of understanding and
>appreciation, while a large number of his older students disagree. I
>would like to know whether these differences regarding our perceptions of
>public art's purposes (public responsibilities, mission, etc.) are to be
>found at various K-12 stages as well. What to very young kids think about
>public art? What to eighth graders think about "hard" or "challenging"
>works like Serra's "Tilted Arc"?
>Ron
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 13:37:02 -0800 (PST)
>From: "R. Moore" <ronmoore>
>Subject: Re: Meaning
>
>Betty Bowen points out that artists sometimes do and sometimes don't know
>just where they are going with a work. Of course, that's right. Consider
>improvisatory jazz--some direction is taken, that suggests something else,
>and as the music evolves, certain moves seem right and fitting, others are
>excluded, so the planning is wrapped up in the execution. But, in
>architecture, almost all of the execution has to be forecast in the plans;
>the structural integrity of the building demands this.
> I think it would be worthwhile to ask students to compare the
>business of making a painting with the business of writing a book (a
>novel, say). Authors often comment on how, after starting a book with a
>plan in mind, the characters somehow "take over," and the plan changes as
>they take shape and develop. Isn't this very much the way a lot of
>painting happens? It would be good to hear what students have to say
>about the creative process in general!
>Ron
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 14:04:31 -0800 (PST)
>From: "R. Moore" <ronmoore>
>Subject: Re: Re: Deb and Mother Nature
>
>I hope many of the art teachers who read the messages in this list will be
>able to catch Debi's talk at NAEA. It sounds like it will be terrific,
>and right on the wave-length of our discussions. Mark your calendars!
>Ron
>
>On Sat, 6 Mar 1999 Debi13 wrote:
>
>> Ron said "Debi raises a very good point about getting students to catch the
>> drift of conceptual issues in art by doing some hands on art themselves."
>>
>> For those interested, I am presenting this on the last day of the NAEA
>> conference, it's called, "It's not nice to fool Mother Nature".
>> Debi
>>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 15:48:36 -0600
>From: "Betty Bowen" <bbowen.ok.us>
>Subject: Re:Time travel
>
>>My guess is that lots of art teachers and other teachers have had
>>useful experiences along these lines with your students--i.e., getting
>>them to imagine themselves into other times and other places in the >course
>of making sense of art. Anybody want to share experiences of >this kind
>with us?
>
>I think the classroom itself would make that very hard.
>
>I used to work in a museum that was frequented by "re-enactors". They are
>"real" cowboys, and also work as movie extras. One day they told me that
>during the filming of the Oklahoma Land Run in "Far and Away" they
>completely forgot, just for a moment, that it wasn't real. For that moment,
>they were their (our) great grandfathers, hungry, tired and running
>desperately for a plot of sorry farmland. They said it was just a flash, but
>changed how they saw everything. I'd had a similar experience when I was
>living in NC several years earlier, so I knew the feeling. I was walking
>down a path across a field to a tiny old Moravian church outside Winston
>Salem. It was autumn, early morning, I was wearing a longish skirt I was
>lifting up out of the wet grass with one hand and carrying a cast iron pot
>of stew in the other. From the church I could hear the unmistakable sound of
>sacred harp singing (why I was there). For a split second I'll never forget,
>there was no sense of "past" and "present". For just a moment, it could have
>been 1840. But like you wrote, my 20th century-ness crashed in instantly,
>but all the same, I'll never forget it. But those examples are Acting and
>Music, I don't know that I have any for visual art.
>
>Betty
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 16:09:57 -0600
>From: "Amy Lewis" <alewis>
>Subject: NAEA presentation you won't want to miss!
>
>Participants of the National Art Education Association are invited to
>attend an interactive presentation highlighting
>innovative and meaningful methods for using warm-up and interpretative
>activities in classroom and museum settings.
>
>We invite you to Experience Art!
>
>Thursday, March 25th, 1999
>6:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.
>Conservatory Room, Hilton
>
>Based on excerpts from Experience Art: A Handbook for Teaching and Learning
>with Works of Art available though Crystal Productions.
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 17:18:42 -0500
>From: "menichino" <menichino>
>Subject: Re: Elementary Art
>
>Hi --
>Personally, I benefit from reading listings from all the levels, K thru
>college and beyond. Yes, it makes for lots of reading, but it beats TV!
>Liz in rural NY
>
>- ----------
>> From: Art <t35839.us>
>> To: artsednet.edu
>> Subject: Elementary Art
>> Date: Friday, March 19, 1999 4:29 PM
>>
>> I saw a list a few weeks ago, asking about Elem. only list serves. Could
>
>> we not ask the Getty folks to set up two different serves - one for elem.
>
>> and one for secondary? Does anyone know who to contact? Personally,
>> I've got about 60 messages I've not been able to read this week, and some
>
>> don't pertaint to my kids on the elem. level. It would cut down on all
>> of our mail bags if we split it. Let me, and I guess Getty, know what
>> you think.
>>
>> Artfully yours,
>> A. Zincone
>> McGee's Xroads Elem.
>> Johnston Co. NC
>>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 14:27:29 -0800
>From: Sue_Stewart (Sue Stewart)
>Subject: Re: Elementary Art
>
>I hope that Getty doesn't split the list - I benefit from all the
>levels of discussion, and students who have never had art - even if
>they are in 10th grade - are exactly at the point of a 3rd grader who
>has. I guess we need to talk about e mail guil- try to skim and scan
>and remember that the Getty is saving it all for you in the archives if
>you ever need it.
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 16:18:13 -0600
>From: "Betty Bowen" <bbowen.ok.us>
>Subject: Re: time travel 2
>
>>So, even though we really know our
>>silly, imperfect games of historical and geographical make-believe are
>>always destined to fall short of the mark, the very gesture they involve
>>is important and worthwhile.
>
>Exactly. But we don't have to go very far back (or away) to get a fresh
>perspective. I know I've mentioned the stack of 1960's - 70's "Horizon"
>magazines I got (68 of them for $6!) at my library booksale recently. To
>read the "latest" art & history scholarship from even that recent of an era
>is an eye-opener for me. Among other things, there are many articles
>celebrating the arts of cultures now even more distanced from us due to the
>current political climates (the Arab world in particular).
>
>Betty
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 17:37:10 EST
>From: Brie29
>Subject: Re: Re: Elementary Art
>
>Agreed- I'ts great to see what everyone is doing. Gabrielle
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 17:46:07 -0500
>From: "Sears, Ellen" <ESears.us>
>Subject: RE: Elementary Art
>
>I love reading all levels - there is too much I pass on to other teachers.
>I also like to know what some of my students might experience in high school
>(I teach 4-8) and most importantly - I think many of the things are
>applicable for many levels and that lots of the things listed can be
>adapted to many ages.
>Ellen
>
>> ----------
>> From: Art
>> Sent: Friday, March 19, 1999 5:29 PM
>> To: artsednet.edu
>> Subject: Elementary Art
>>
>> I saw a list a few weeks ago, asking about Elem. only list serves. Could
>> we not ask the Getty folks to set up two different serves - one for elem.
>> and one for secondary? Does anyone know who to contact? Personally,
>> I've got about 60 messages I've not been able to read this week, and some
>> don't pertaint to my kids on the elem. level. It would cut down on all
>> of our mail bags if we split it. Let me, and I guess Getty, know what
>> you think.
>>
>> Artfully yours,
>> A. Zincone
>> McGee's Xroads Elem.
>> Johnston Co. NC
>>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 17:39:08 -0600
>From: gregjuli
>Subject: Re: Meaning and Artist's Intention
>
>> Ron,
>
>I've taken art history courses were the instructor ended the course with a
>meal from an artist's time period. We had a Van Gogh dinner once and a
>Toulose dinner another time. It was very interesting and fun even if I didn't
>care for all the food. Imagine what fun that could be for students, but this
>was a class for teachers and the meals were prepared by restaurants. It often
>comes down to time and money.
>MaryB
>
>>
>> My guess is that lots of art teachers and other teachers have had
>> useful experiences along these lines with your students--i.e., getting
>> them to imagine themselves into other times and other places in the course
>> of making sense of art. Anybody want to share experiences of this kind
>> with us?
>>
>> Ron
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 18:43:42 EST
>From: DeDeRuss
>Subject: Re: Elementary Art
>
>I enjoy reading the posts on all levels as well, even tho' I teach pre-k--8th.
>I have taught highschool in the past and it is very interesting to see what
>secondary teachers are doing. I have even adapted lessons on design that my
>daughter had as a freshman college student to my 8th graders---and also
>several lessons she had in highschool in an advanced ceramic class for my 5th
>grade. (As a matter of fact "School Arts" will be publishing the ceramic
>lesson I adapted for my 5th grade this year.) I just adjust the lessons for
>the levels I teach, and all lessons at every grade level have been very
>valuable to me as a teacher. I enjoy what others have to say about art and
>life in general and would continue to read all the posts. Keep up the great
>comments.....Happy Spring!!
>DeDe from NJ (where daffodils are rearing their little yellow heads)
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 17:49:47 -0600
>From: gregjuli
>Subject: Re: Meaning
>
>Would this be similar to "creative license"? Sometimes in an assignment, for
>example clay, a student will ask if they can deviate from their sketch when
>building their piece. I always say
>"of course", artists often change their minds. It makes students more
>creative if they know they aren't locked into their original idea. But I
>think it is good to at least ( as far as students go) that they have some sort
>of plan or sketch in mind.
>We do compare a comparison to builders in class how they have their blueprints
>and we have our sketches. They are some circumstances were no sketch probably
>will work, but in middle school I have found they seem to need a starting
>point and then take off in other directions if necessary.
>I love the comparsion to jazz music. I 'll tie that one in also when we talk
>about artists changing their minds.
>MaryB
>
>"R. Moore" wrote:
>
>> Betty Bowen points out that artists sometimes do and sometimes don't know
>> just where they are going with a work. Of course, that's right. Consider
>> improvisatory jazz--some direction is taken, that suggests something else,
>> and as the music evolves, certain moves seem right and fitting, others are
>> excluded, so the planning is wrapped up in the execution. But, in
>> architecture, almost all of the execution has to be forecast in the plans;
>> the structural integrity of the building demands this.
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 18:54:22 EST
>From: AbeleSmith
>Subject: Re: Elementary Art
>
>I also benefit from reading about all levels of art education. One never
>knows when one might be teaching another level!
>
>Terry
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 18:22:29 -0600
>From: gregjuli
>Subject: Re: Elementary Art
>
>NO split please! I benefit from hearing about art from all areas. If you
>don't want to read something - just delete.
>MaryB
>
>Art wrote:
>
>> I saw a list a few weeks ago, asking about Elem. only list serves. Could
>> we not ask the Getty folks to set up two different serves - one for elem.
>> and one for secondary? Does anyone know who to contact? Personally,
>> I've got about 60 messages I've not been able to read this week, and some
>> don't pertaint to my kids on the elem. level. It would cut down on all
>> of our mail bags if we split it. Let me, and I guess Getty, know what
>> you think.
>>
>> Artfully yours,
>> A. Zincone
>> McGee's Xroads Elem.
>> Johnston Co. NC
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 16:19:10 -0800
>From: Charlotte Griswold <griswald>
>Subject: Re: Elementary Art
>
>Please don't split the list...it is great as is.
>- --
>Charlotte Griswold
>OakHill Middle School
>ClearLake CA. 95457
>griswald
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 20:36:21 EST
>From: GBWOLF
>Subject: Music and Art
>
>I teach my kindergarteners to paint using Bert Kaempfert's CD "The Very Best
>of Bert Kaempfert" I love the song "That Happy Feeling". It gets them bee
>bopping while painting. It's kind of like musical chairs. We can paint when
>the music's on, stop and change tables when it's off. I have various colors
>in open jars on each of 5 tables. Two brushes per jar. They go to a table
>for about 4 minutes worth of music, then switch. At the end they've been to
>all the tables and used every color.
>I loosen the routine up after a while, once I think they can handle it. By
>the end of our tempera painting unit they can go at their own speed, to any
>table they want.
>Back to Kaempfert...I use the CD when other grades paint too. It's all
>instrumental. The music teacher does a unit on him too (at my
>request)...which integrates our two curriculums nicely. The kids are familiar
>with his style and sound by the time we've painted to it a few times. It's so
>upbeat!
>- -Becca
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 02:27:16 -0500
>From: marcia m eaton <marciameaton>
>Subject: size/meaning/intention
>
>The recent discussion about how small things can be powerful suggest an
>intereting distinction---one that I think it is important to keep in mind
>when we think about meaning and interpretation: Just as it is possible for
>a painting to be red without being about redness or to be small without be
>about smallness, so it is possible for a painting to be powerful without
>being about power. This is why I think it is hard for small things to be
>about power although they are, of course, often very powerful. Trajan
>intended that his Forum be powerful as well as being about power. I think
>getting your students to think about this distinction might be a good
>exercise. Here are some suggested questions:
>1. When can a work have a property P without it being about P?
>That is, might a work be red without being about redness?
>Might a work be small without being about smallness?
>2. When can a work be about P without having the property P?
>That is, can a work be about redness without having any red in it?
>Can a work be about smallness without itself being small?
>Can a ceramic work be about oil painting?
>3. Can a work have a property P about be about not-P?
>That is, might a work be small and be about bigness?
>The general question here, of course, is how properties of the media
>artists use work to generate meaning.
>Let me know what examples they come up with. Best, Marcia
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 03:46:34 EST
>From: JUYOUNKI
>Subject: Thank you
>
>Hi, I'm Inja again.
>I really appreciate all your truthful advices.
>
>In fact, my daughter has no art teacher at school, that's why I'm frustrated.
>But now I have your great advices. First of all, I'll take her art museum
>tomorrow, then I'll try community center. Fortunately, it's spring break.
>
>Thank all, peace with you. Inja
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 09:55:51 -0500
>From: rojul (Rosa Juliusdottir)
>Subject: Re: Elementary Art
>
>I totally agree with those who say DONīT SPLIT THE LIST. It gives a broader
>view of Art Education this way.
>Best regards from the far north,
>Rosa
>
>Rosa Juliusdottir
>Akureyri School of Visual Arts
>Akureyri 600
>Iceland
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 08:28:17 +0000
>From: "Lisa R. Harman" <lharman>
>Subject: Painting
>
>> THE OIL PAINTING
>> - Submitted by Rubin
>> ------------------------------------
>> An elderly woman decided to have her portrait painted.
>> She told the the artist....
>>
>> ....."Paint me with diamond earrings, a diamond necklace,
>> emerald bracelets, a ruby broach, and gold Rolex. "
>>
>> "But you are not wearing any of those things."
>>
>> "I know," she said. "It's in case I should die before my husband.
>> I'm sure he will remarry right away, and I want his new wife
>> to go crazy looking for the jewelry.
>
>Good one!!!!!
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 08:19:30 EST
>From: RWilk85411
>Subject: Re: elementary art
>
>I think it would be terrible to split the list. I enjoy reading the posts from
>everyone at every level. I have never taught elementary level but I enjoy
>reading posts from people who are diligently trying to teach art not just
>provide activities for them. I know I benefit from students who have had art
>and not activities at the elementary level. I agree with the person who said
>that a high school student who has had no art is equivalent to a third grader
>(approximately) who has. Sometimes it is not even that good. Sometimes I gain
>insight on how to deal with the student who has had no art. I too sometimes
>have too much on my plate. If I don't have time to read the entire list, I
>just scan and delete. But I have learned to at least read the first sentence
>in the post. Otherwise I miss important issues. Please let us not split the
>list.
>Reatha
>
>------------------------------
>
>End of artsednet-digest V2 #1312
>********************************
>
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