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Lesson Plans


Re: artsednet-digest V2 #1301

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Scurfield (scurfield)
Sat, 13 Mar 1999 09:49:32 -0600


artsednet-digest wrote:
>
> artsednet-digest Saturday, March 13 1999 Volume 02 : Number 1301
>
> This edition includes :
> Interdisciplinary lesson plans
> Re: Elementary parents
> Re: simulated etching
> Oil Painting
> Re: Oil Painting
> Re: Oil Painting
> Thank you
> Cornell
> RE: Building curriculum bridges -long - maybe too long?
> Multicultural skin tone colors
> Washington Convention
> National, State and Local Standards
> Re: Re: Wanted: Native American ideas
> [Fwd: PUPT: A broader query on plastic wood]long post on paper mache
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 12 Mar 1999 17:33:44 -0600
> From: "dana" <dacuncius>
> Subject: Interdisciplinary lesson plans
>
> The following web site has the most wonderful collection of lesson plans
> that are art and core subject interdisciplinary ready!!
> http://artsedge.kennedy-center.org
> Dana
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 12 Mar 1999 19:46:15 -0500
> From: lindacharlie <lindacharlie>
> Subject: Re: Elementary parents
>
> Stephanie Ignazio wrote:
>
> > interesting grade 6 ideas?
> > I have NO preference. I just want to keep them busy till JUNE!!!
>
> My three 6th grades are currently involved in drawing Egyptian style
> figures according to the conventional 18 1/2 units tall. I showed them a
> poster I got from the Detroit Inst. of Arts of an Egyptian wall painting
> which clearly shows the grid used by the ancient artists and gave them a
> handout of an Egyptian figure blocked out on the grid. They have a
> choice of working in groups of 2 or 3 on an almost life size painting or
> individually on a small section of what will become a scrolled "Book of
> the Dead." These works will be part of our Egyptian "Valley of the
> Kings" for the art show in April. They are really into it. If you'd like
> more details about this stuff, just ask :)
> Linda 4" deep in Michigan spring
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 12 Mar 1999 20:22:12 -0500
> From: "Donna Janeczko" <redhen>
> Subject: Re: simulated etching
>
> 'Don't know if this will be any help at all, but once when I wanted college
> students to understand the concept of intaglio printing, we used Styrofoam
> tray material. Line designs were impressed on the Styrofoam with pens and
> pencils. Ink was applied heavily with a brayer, making sure that some got
> down into the impressed lines. The surface ink was then wiped off, leaving
> only the ink in the impressed lines.
>
> When it came time to print the plate, because Styrofoam "gives" more than
> hard plastic, pressure applied with a press or with a brayer on the back of
> the printing paper generally yielded a high percentage of successful prints.
>
> Art Ed. Materials Garage Sale at:
> http://members.tripod.com/~LittleRed_2/
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 12 Mar 1999 22:01:39 -0500
> From: Double Bubble <doros>
> Subject: Oil Painting
>
> How does one get around the smell of using oil paints, turpentine and
> lineseed oil in senior high school art classes. I have just started
> using oil paints with my senior grades and have started to receive
> complaints from a few people in the school. One of them from the other
> art teacher who also uses my room following my class. I have to admit
> that the odour is unavoidable and coming into the room from another part
> of the school it strikes you immediately. The room is well ventilated
> and windows are open when students are painting even in the middle of
> winter when my room almost turns into an icebox. I don't know which is
> worse the scent of turps or having to freeze. None of my students in my
> class have complained but the other teacher says some of her students
> are getting headaches and not feeling well ( could also be the flu
> season).
> I realize that there are some health and safety concerns but everything
> as far as ventilation is provided within the class. I am also using a
> low odour turpentine. I feel that oil paints should be experience by
> all senior students and do not want to deprive them of this.
> Any suggestions from teacher who work with oils would be greatly
> appreciated.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 12 Mar 1999 21:12:28 -0500
> From: John & Sandra Barrick <astroboy>
> Subject: Re: Oil Painting
>
> It's a wonderful smell- but some people cannot tolerate it. It's
> also one of my oldest "Scent" memories. You could use alkyds, which
> are water based oil paints (don't ask). You could and should use
> ventilation. Are these annoyances coming from art students or people
> in the halls. After awhile people get used to the smell. I am amazed
> that it is offending the other art teacher. Since you are sharing
> space- maybe next time switch to alkyds. Have the students cover
> their paintings with a tarp or cloth. make sure they clean brushes
> and have a drum to put old linseed oil and other thinners/etc. Wrap
> the palettes to protect the smell some.
> Good luck!
> S
>
> Double Bubble wrote:
> >
> > How does one get around the smell of using oil paints, turpentine and
> > lineseed oil in senior high school art classes. I have just started
> > using oil paints with my senior grades and have started to receive
> > complaints from a few people in the school. One of them from the other
> > art teacher who also uses my room following my class.
> > Any suggestions from teacher who work with oils would be greatly
> > appreciated.
>
> Sandra Barrick
> http://home.fuse.net/astroboy/Sandra.html
>
> astroboy
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 12 Mar 1999 23:47:02 EST
> From: AbeleSmith
> Subject: Re: Oil Painting
>
> The fumes are toxic and can be hazardous to one's health. Just because the
> turp has no scent doesn't mean it's not in the air for the children to
> breathe. Let them paint with oils in college when they can make better
> choices.
>
> Terry in Garland, TX
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 12 Mar 1999 21:46:26 -0800
> From: "Rob Morey" <raboo>
> Subject: Thank you
>
> This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
>
> - ------=_NextPart_000_006D_01BE6CD1.C7CE3FE0
> Content-Type: text/plain;
> charset="iso-8859-1"
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>
> Sharon:
>
> Thank you so much for sharing your story. You are a special teacher and =
> the member of an elite group. Teachers are a dime a dozen, but good =
> teachers, the ones who are there to put forth all of their energy for =
> all of the right reasons, are priceless. I really feel sorry for the =
> teachers who have been so stressed out over the problems that they are =
> having with their co-workers and their associates, (that can be so =
> incredibly draining.) However, I don't feel sorry for them because of =
> the problems that they have been describing, but because I think they =
> have their priorities all mixed up, even though they have the very best =
> of intentions. If a teacher walked into my class, interrupting my =
> lesson to ask for something stupid so stupid and selfish as a foam-core =
> guitar or a birthday card for their grand-child, ( and they have,) the =
> answer is a plain and simple NO, with a following of, "Please don't =
> interrupt my class again." If they get upset, well, to bad. If they are =
> such light weights about that kind of stuff, then I sure don't what them =
> on my team. I need to have strong, committed people on my side. Why do =
> we put up with the long hours and the less than adequate pay and the =
> public criticism? We do it for the kids, period. If we are there for =
> any other reason, then we are there for all of the wrong reasons. We =
> are not decorators of hallways and bulletin boards and such. We are =
> educators and if we don't demand respect from our peers, then they =
> aren't going to give it to us. It may seem unfair, but that is life. =
> Frankly, the day that I start stressing out over anything else other =
> than my job as a teacher and how well I teach, that is the day that I =
> will quit teaching, because I will have become ineffective. =20
> Keep up the wonderful work.=20
> Rob
>
> - ------=_NextPart_000_006D_01BE6CD1.C7CE3FE0
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>
> <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN">
> <HTML>
> <HEAD>
>
> <META content=3Dtext/html;charset=3Diso-8859-1 =
> http-equiv=3DContent-Type>
> <META content=3D'"MSHTML 4.72.3110.7"' name=3DGENERATOR>
> </HEAD>
> <BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>Sharon:</FONT></DIV>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>Thank you so much for sharing your =
> story. You=20
> are a special teacher and the member of an elite group. Teachers are a =
> dime a=20
> dozen, but good teachers, the ones who are there to put forth all of =
> their=20
> energy for all of the right reasons, are priceless.&nbsp; I really feel =
> sorry=20
> for the teachers who have been so stressed out over the problems that =
> they are=20
> having with their co-workers and their associates, (that can be so =
> incredibly=20
> draining.)&nbsp; However, I don't feel sorry for them because of the =
> problems=20
> that they have been describing, but because I think they have their =
> priorities=20
> all mixed up, even though they have the very best of intentions.&nbsp; =
> If a=20
> teacher walked into my class, interrupting my lesson to ask for =
> something stupid=20
> so stupid and selfish as a foam-core guitar or a birthday card for their =
>
> grand-child, ( and they have,) the answer is a plain and simple NO, with =
> a=20
> following of, &quot;Please don't interrupt my class again.&quot;&nbsp; =
> If they=20
> get upset, well, to bad. If they are such light weights about that kind =
> of=20
> stuff, then I sure don't what them on my team. I need to have strong, =
> committed=20
> people on my side.&nbsp; Why do we put up with the long hours and the =
> less than=20
> adequate pay and the public criticism?&nbsp; We do it for the kids,=20
> period.&nbsp; If we are there for any other reason, then we are there =
> for all of=20
> the wrong reasons.&nbsp; We are not decorators of hallways and bulletin =
> boards=20
> and such.&nbsp; We are educators and if we don't demand respect from our =
> peers,=20
> then they aren't going to give it to us.&nbsp; It may seem unfair, but =
> that is=20
> life.&nbsp; Frankly, the day that I start stressing out over anything =
> else other=20
> than my job as a teacher and how well I teach, that is the day that I =
> will quit=20
> teaching, because I will have become ineffective.&nbsp; </FONT></DIV>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>Keep up the wonderful work. =
> </FONT></DIV>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>Rob</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>
>
> - ------=_NextPart_000_006D_01BE6CD1.C7CE3FE0--
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 13 Mar 1999 07:48:04 -0700
> From: "Henry Taylor" <taylorh>
> Subject: Cornell
>
> Anyone out there done a Cornell unit recently? I want to put together a
> middle school lesson plan. I'd really like to see some different takes on
> the subject.
>
> thanks
> - -henry
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 13 Mar 1999 12:52:14 -0500
> From: "Sears, Ellen" <ESears.us>
> Subject: RE: Building curriculum bridges -long - maybe too long?
>
> Rob - thanks for your support.
>
> We have a pretty small school, and most of our MS teachers are strong in
> other areas (Language Arts has a science minor, math's is music, music is
> science... and on and on.) As a group of teachers, they are very
> supportive, but I am looking for something more formal, permanent.
>
> The fine line I am encountering lately is balancing between getting art 'out
> there' and doing my job. Do I turn down the science teacher that is doing
> simple machines when we can work together on kinetic sculptures and motion
> machines? What about when he starts light and reflection and comes to me
> for info on kaleidoscopes? Do I let him walk out the door, or do I welcome
> his questions and grab stuff together during my planning? (and kaleidoscope
> poetry for the LA teacher... ) What about the math teacher that invites me
> into a 7th grade room to do a lesson on perspective drawing and dilation
> (proportion and enlargements)? they don't know what they don't know -
> unless I tell them - HAHAHAHAH!!! I've really got to sell myself (read
> 'art') - but it gets to be too much - I can either laugh about it, and
> explain or explode. If I'm going to explode, I close the door. The other
> day I told one teacher they were the 12 in my room in a matter of 3 hours.
> They know. So what's the plus side? If I have a class, I only stop to help
> if they are working on something, it's only a couple of minutes - but I get
> to tell them how art relates to what Mr. M. is working on in his class, or
> Mrs. P. - I take it as a teachable moment. Good PR.
>
> I sent a post before about creative scheduling and inclusion of the arts
> teacher into 'common planning time'. I didn't get any responses that I
> could use with my principal. He is aware of what I would like to see -
> total integration - but he doesn't know how to do it. He did offer to let
> me teach with the Language Arts and Social Studies teacher as a team -
> because they are loosey goosey subjects - Arghhhhh! The funny thing is, I
> am a math teacher and very interested in the sciences. (I used to teach
> Language Arts too... but not Social Studies - I have never been associated
> with Social Studies, I have never bonded with Social Studies - get the
> idea?)
> so I am working on a new plan...
>
> Just this year we have gained 3 new teachers that have changed the dynamics
> of some of the grades. Several teachers have been meeting as a study group
> - - researching constructivism. We are looking into vertical teaming as
> opposed to grade group teaming. Now I am going for being a member of a team
> that has common methods/practices.
>
> My principal's answer is that the PE teacher gets along fine just being in
> the gym - he doesn't feel the need to share - nor does the music teacher and
> so on. In other words - he is very sympathetic and open to my suggestions,
> but he doesn't know what to do about it.
>
> My husband teacher a K-1 class here. He is a Presidential Award winner in
> science... and we do a lot together (for school!) - people get to see how we
> incorporate the two subjects - and we have come up with many art based
> performance assessments. You know how juvenile teachers can be - if someone
> else has it/does it etc - they want to too. So anyone that is trying to do
> the same, maybe start with one teacher and work from there.
>
> And as far as 'borrowing' supplies - HAHA - borrowing consumables - that's
> an oxymoron, right? I offered to order a classroom set of markers etc, for
> MS and they can pass it around. I put extra on the student supply list and
> collect it at the beginning of the year, I help go through the bid list with
> interested teachers and point out the supplies they need in their room (the
> biggest help) - but I can spare some paper - I'm funny about paint - I have
> cheaper brushes to loan out - it has gotten much better.
>
> But most of all, it's not us and them (math can be fun and creative, and so
> can science), and we really don't teach art - or kids - we value sharing
> knowledge - art, music, math - okay even social studies (smile) - with
> people of all ages. So I've got to make it work.
>
> so Rob - I continue to battle in the name of art (okay that sounds a little
> like 'us and them' )- I take any and every chance I can get to connect it to
> other subjects. Where to draw the line? At personal favors (can you draw
> this?... Yes - and so can you, let me show you.), book report covers and
> science fair lettering.
>
> Ellen
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 13 Mar 1999 00:30:47 -0600
> From: Scurfield <scurfield>
> Subject: Multicultural skin tone colors
>
> I am going to be ordering some sets of tempera paints, markers,
> construction paper, etc. in multicultural skin tones. The only brands I
> am at all familiar with are Crayola (markers and paints) and Pacon
> (construction paper). Does anyone have any imput on which brands you
> think have the best (i.e.true-to-life) colors?
> Marcia Scurfield
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 13 Mar 1999 13:57:01 EST
> From: Brie29
> Subject: Washington Convention
>
> Anyone going to Washington need a room mate??? I'm thinking of going from the
> 24th to the 26th or 27 but the rooms are spendy! Anyone need a room mate to
> cut expenses? Gabrielle NBCT in Minnesota,
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 13 Mar 1999 14:01:27 EST
> From: Brie29
> Subject: National, State and Local Standards
>
> Hey all! This weekend I'm doing a paper on how the standards movement has
> impacted art education. Yes, I'm well aware of the standards and all of the
> prfessional material written about it. What I really need to know is how do
> they impact our daily teaching in art education? Do they impact your teaching?
> Do you just do what you have always done or what??? Anyone that has the time
> to answer this through Monday night, I would greatly appreciate any response
> at all- yay, nay etc. Thanks so much, Gabrielle NBCT in Minnesota with snow
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 13 Mar 1999 14:10:55 EST
> From: Brie29
> Subject: Re: Re: Wanted: Native American ideas
>
> Sandpainting always intrugues my students. I baught a book a couple of years
> ago
> on sandpainting and read about it so that I really knew the history. Now I but
> sand at a gardening supply store- about two dollars worth and color it in
> buckets with powdered tempera. (Use rubber gloves) Having already studied
> traditional Navajo work and symbols, I do a demonstration of how traditionally
> sandpainting was part of a healing ceremony and it sould also have singing and
> chanting with it. At the end of the ceremony the sand was always dispursed in
> the desert because the sand grains would contain the illness. As times have
> changed with the Europeanization of traditional Navajo culture, sandpainting
> has been changed from a sacred ceremony to a secular art that people can
> practice for money. The sacred symbols are NOT used and the sand is glued down
> so the paintings are permanent. Students then can work with personal symbols
> or use traditional (non sacred symbols) to create and glue down their own
> paintings our ofd sand. They love it.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 13 Mar 1999 16:57:52 -0500
> From: KP RS <KPRS>
> Subject: [Fwd: PUPT: A broader query on plastic wood]long post on paper mache
>
> This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
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>
> I am on another list--that of puppet makers/performers, and they are
> discussing paper mache methods...thought some of you might be interested
> as they are using common ingredients that would lend themselves to
> everything from puppets to sculpture in both the elementary level and
> highschool level.
>
> San D
>
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> Date: Sat, 13 Mar 1999 16:49:07 -0500
> To: puptcrit.edu
> From: Dave&Ann Yates <monet>
> Subject: Re: PUPT: A broader query on plastic wood
> Sender: owner-puptcrit.edu
> Precedence: bulk
> Reply-To: puptcrit.edu
>
> Amanda,
>
> For strengthening in -between papier mache layers- I use gauze dipped and
> wrung out in watered down Elmers- also cooked and strained flour glue works
> well. I also use a paint brush to mold it into detailed areas. You can buy
> assorted gauze mesh through theatre catalogues.
>
> Another use is to paint with glue-stretch and DRY the gauze layer onto wax
> paper. After it dries it can be painted and then let dry again. when it is
> dry shapes can be cut and then stitched onto exotic puppets.* Sews up like
> fabric and with aniline dyes it creates beautiful color effects. Saves
> purchasing expensive fabrics. It also can be rolled and twisted even
> knotted while wet - Great for scenic effects too. If you want
> "gauzier"effects-peel off the wax paper layer..
>
> Annie
>
> > Amanda:
> >
> >If you want a light hand puppet head with good detail and a reasonable
> >amount of durability to withstand a summer season of performances and have
> >limited funds available (I assume this since in past queries you rule out
> >Neoprene because of cost - too bad because it is a great material to work
> >in) I would suggest that you use a stronger version of paper mache using
> >straight elmers glue and brown paper grocery bags. Yes - you can get
> >wonderful definition of facial detail if you remember the following:
> >
> > When working with brown paper bags you have to 'prepare' it first.
> >Tear large pieces, 'work them' so that they are totally limp and floppy by
> >repeatedly crumpling them, rubbing them against each other etc. until they
> >are very floppy and this side of disintegrating. This now leaves the once
> >stiff paper very receptive to absorbing the glue. Put Elmers glue on both
> >sides, working it into the paper and let it sit for a couple of minutes so
> >that the paper has a chance to absorbed the glue. You will find it will
> >be a very, 'light leathery' consistency. Scrape off excess glue that does
> >not become absorbed - you don't want it 'gooey'. Start tearing off small
> >pieces and start working each individual piece over the clay
> >sculpture/carved styrofoam overlapping each piece. Cover the entire head
> >with a thin coating of glue and let it dry thoroughly. Do a second coat
> >putting a little coloring into the glue so that you know which coat is the
> >second and which is the first. Let dry thoroughly. Do a third coat. Let
> >dry thoroughly. To hurry the drying process along we have, on occasion,
> >used a hair dryer.
> >
> >When the head is thoroughly dry, and if it is paper over clay, cut a hole
> >in the back of the paper mache head, remove the paper mache 'cap' and
> >scoop out the clay. The reason I suggest using the 'cap' method instead
> >of cutting it in half is for strength. No side seams to cause weakness.
> >If it's a LARGE head then you will have to cut the paper mache head in
> >half, separate it, remove the clay and then glue and patch the seam. If
> >you've done it over styrofoam then leave it.
> >
> >Give a light sanding to the whole head, keep filling in the little
> >imperfections with plastic wood/dap (you won't need much) until the head
> >'is as smooth as a baby's butt'. This has now 'opened up' the mache for
> >dampness. To seal it give a couple of coats of a good wood sealer. The
> >head will 'drink in' the sealer which, when dry, will protect the paper
> >mache from the possibility of getting soft if it is exposed to dampness
> >which, doing an outside show, it will be. If it is a hand puppet I would
> >also suggest giving a couple of coats to the inside of the head before you
> >glue the cap on since a sweaty finger will also cause dampness to be
> >introduced into the head and possibly causing softening of the mache over
> >the summer. No need to sand the inside.
> >
> >We have used this method on several of our figures - NANA from our
> >production of Peter Pan has a mache head WITH a moving mouth - we have
> >never had any problems with them. They are light, strong and after
> >several years of touring and doing shows almost every day they show no
> >signs of breaking down.
> >
> >If you work the mache carefully over the clay/styrofoam you will get
> >lovely definition of features - not what is usually associated with 'mache
> >heads'. It's time consuming. Haven't found any short cut in preparing
> >the brown bags for the glue. Nice to do while listening to music or
> >watching TV. Extremely cost efficient and non-toxic.
> >
> >Does anyone else on the list have anything to add to this method?
> >
> >David Syrotiak (the elder)
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
> --- Personal replies to: Dave&Ann Yates <monet>
> --- List replies to: puptcrit.edu
> --- Admin commands to: majordomo.edu
>
> - --------------A00E897451FD0FBCC82F6820--
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of artsednet-digest V2 #1301
> ********************************
>
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San D--could you give us the URL for the puppet/ performers list?
Thanks! Marcia