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Lesson Plans


RE:What to do with lazy M.S. students/time for the next project!

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Rob Morey (raboo)
Sun, 7 Mar 1999 11:30:12 -0800


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I have that same problem with high school students. I found two ways =
that work for me. First I have a 6 point rubric that I give on a daily =
basis. This rubric is based mostly upon effort. I feel that it gives =
the student who has less experience with art or less ability, a fighting =
chance to get a decent grade. My feeling is that if a student makes an =
effort, then it will show. It also keeps the more "talented" students =
from slacking off and motivates them to improve. My second strategy is =
that I put a due date on every project. I try to make this date as =
reasonable as possible so I don't have to change it. If a student has =
not finished, but has made a good effort I give that work a "D" grade. =
The more effort, the higher within the scale of "D" it is. If however, =
the student has not put much effort into the work by playing around and =
seldom on task, the work receives a low "D" or a high "F". I then give =
the work back to the student, telling them that if they want a better =
grade on the project, then finish it and turn it back in later. What I =
have found is that the students who don't try, seldom turn work in =
later. The students who do try, will almost always turn the work in =
later, and the wait is usually worth it. It is no great suprise that =
the rubric is almost always on target. I created an Excel file for each =
class and all I have to do is type in the daily grades, which my T.A. =
can do, and the "end of semester crunch" to get grades in, is a snap. =
Good luck and I hope this helps you out.
Rob Morey, San Diego

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I have that same problem with high = school=20 students.  I found two ways that work for me.  First I have a = 6 point=20 rubric that I give on a daily basis.  This rubric is based mostly = upon=20 effort.  I feel that it gives the student who has less experience = with art=20 or less ability, a fighting chance to get a decent grade.  My = feeling is=20 that if a student makes an effort, then it will show.  It also = keeps the=20 more "talented" students from slacking off and motivates them = to=20 improve.  My second strategy is that I put a due date on every=20 project.  I try to make this date as reasonable as possible so I = don't have=20 to change it.  If a student has not finished, but has made a good = effort I=20 give that work a "D" grade.  The more effort, the higher = within=20 the scale of "D" it is. If however, the student has not put = much=20 effort into the work by playing around and seldom on task, the work = receives a=20 low "D" or a high "F".  I then give the work = back to=20 the student, telling them that if they want a better grade on the = project, then=20 finish it and turn it back in later.  What I have found is that the = students who don't try, seldom turn work in later.  The students = who do=20 try, will almost always turn the work in later, and the wait is usually = worth=20 it.  It is no great suprise that the rubric is almost always on=20 target.  I created an Excel file for each class and all I have to = do is=20 type in the daily grades, which my T.A. can do, and the "end of = semester=20 crunch" to get grades in, is a snap.  Good luck and = I hope this helps you out.
Rob Morey, San = Diego
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