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Lesson Plans


Cubism

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Claudia Waters (ceawaters)
Sat, 14 Mar 1998 10:34:49 -0800


Dear Rick and Cubist Contributors: I teach a 4/5 multi-age class and am
finishing up a unit on perimeter, area and volume. I used Picasso to
help the kids understand these concepts. We drew portraits as suggested
by someone in this "Getty Group" (sorry, I can't give credit as my hard
copy is at school) - drawing a line down the center of the paper (we
used black paper) and using geometric shapes to draw portraits using oil
pastels of their partners - front view on one side of the line and side
view on the other. The kids loved it. They had to measure the shapes,
listing perimeter and area for each.
Next we made 3 dimensional multi-colored paper sculptures of their
partners. Most did just the head, some did the whole body. They had to
create and chart each shape, list its dimensions and volume, then
measure how many cups of rice each shape could hold, before they could
put the pieces together to form the whole sculpture. Their "title
cards" list the name of the subject, the artist and the total volume of
the sculpture. This has been VERY successful. And, I know that the
students at last understand the difference between area and volume (this
was what they were having trouble with even after using Base 10 blocks
and Rainbow Cubes). This is a class of 10 and 11 year olds. 7 through
9 year olds probably would do well on just measuring the rice and
forgetting the cubic measurements. The rice turns into a lesson on
adding fractions. This is obviously all encompassing. I love tying the
arts to curriculum. If I had more time I would go on to the instruments
and I would like to hear more about them so I can do that next year.

I've been reading, printing and saving ideas from all of you for the
last few weeks. Thanks to you all. Claudia


  • Maybe reply: Lisa Allen: "Re: Cubism"