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Lesson Plans


to be a good art teacher

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Jerry Vilenski (jvilensk)
Tue, 10 Mar 1998 10:02:40 -0800


artsednet-digest wrote:
>
> artsednet-digest Tuesday, March 10 1998 Volume 02 : Number 641
>
> This edition includes :
> New York
> (no subject)
> Re: new york art and Tar Beach
> Re: noisy classes
> Check out these Illustrations
> Re: Fran's misinterpretation re.-dif. philosophy
> Re: Music Teachers Association Web Site
> Re: artsednet-digest V2 #640
> Re: New York
> To be a good art educator does one have to be an artist.
> Re: (no subject)
> Second World War.
> Re: Mellisa Chaney Art Work/Prints
> Re: Mellisa Chaney Art Work/Prints
> Re: (no subject)
> Re: Seventh Grade Ceramics
> Re: Seventh Grade Ceramics
> Re: (no subject)
> Stubby / Asian brush painting
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 09 Mar 1998 18:44:59 -0500
> From: "John M. Barrick" <astroboy>
> Subject: New York
>
> Stacy,
> Hi,I immediatly thought of Red Grooms a fabulous New York
> Artist. While I was living there years ago he had a wonderful
> installation in the city called"Ruckus Manhattan". If you can look at
> the book. In short he made several environments you could walk through.
> The themes varied, one was a subway,another was Stock exchange and of
> course he did the Statue of liberty. He makes scaled down sculptures
> which you can walk through. I've worked for years with preschool through
> 8th and especially younger kids have a great learning experience as
> well as having fun making large pieces which they can feel,touch and
> work as a group doing. Perhaps dividing the kids into groups of 4 or 5
> and making giant paper mache sculptures of skyscrapers,people,Taxi's
> The Statue of Liberty. I don't know what your time frame is but it would
> be a great cooperative project.
>
> Have fun,
> Sandra
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 09 Mar 1998 19:13:56 -0500
> From: ricki fromkin <fromkinr>
> Subject: (no subject)
>
> To be a good art educator does one have to be an artist?
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 09 Mar 1998 19:28:10 -0800
> From: susan reynolds <reynolds>
> Subject: Re: new york art and Tar Beach
>
> I recently observed a class of 1st graders, where the teacher used "Tar
> Beach". She read the story to the class. She then had them close their
> eyes and take a "flight" of imagination of their own, and with precut
> squares of brightly colored wrapping paper they created an quilt on the
> outside of a large piece of paper with glue, and in the center they drew
> a picture of the "place they owned" after their flight of imagination.
> As they were finishing up, they were given a bonus question for the day
> for each "table" to discuss and answer as a group. The questions were
> related to the book. They thoroughly enjoyed this exercise, the
> drawings were very imaginative, and every student was able to accomplish
> a finished product in one class period, Special Ed kids and regular
> kids. This class was half and half.
>
> susan
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 09 Mar 1998 19:15:14 -0600
> From: Kimberly Anne Herbert <kimberly>
> Subject: Re: noisy classes
>
> With elementary students during tours, we have a problem because 1/4 of
> the class is on the tour and 3/4 are working hands-on art projects. If
> they get to loud, I get their attention (or the teacher's) and as them
> to use their inside voices or 6" voices. Generally they are very
> excited, but we try and keep them down to a dull roar. You might find
> out what "terms" the other teacher's working with that grade level use.
> The three most popular in our district are inside voices, 6" voices, or
> "if you can hear me clap once" (some children clap) "if you can hear me
> clap twice (children clap). I find with primary elementary children some
> don't respond if you use a term they don't understand (please be quiet
> they don't understand their quiet can be hears in the restraunt on the
> second floor).
>
> Kimberly Herbert
> CAM Administrator
> kimberly
>
> BOL7060 wrote:
> >
> > to Diane and interested parties-
> > Something that works great for me is "Silent Art" When the volume gets too
> > high, everyone loses their PRIVILEGE to talk. Sometimes it"s just for 5min.
> > to adjust volume and some days it needs to be done for the whole class time.
> > I have some classes where I've never needed "silent art" time and others where
> > it helped me keep my sanity. Kids get a lot more done and are better focused
> > if talking doesn't take over. Good-luck
> > Artfully,
> > Peri
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 09 Mar 1998 19:23:26 -0600
> From: Kimberly Anne Herbert <kimberly>
> Subject: Check out these Illustrations
>
> We purchased _Rumpelstiltskin's Daughter_ by Diane Stanley for the
> Picture Book Libary. I love it (the miller's Daughter marries
> Rumpelstltskin and their Daughter changes the kingdomn). It was the
> third or fourth time I look through the book, that I noticed the
> paintings in the illustrations. In the illustrations of the Castle there
> are copies of famous paintings on the walls. The Piccasso is the most
> obvious. It would be a great find the hidden picture type activity for
> younger children. For older children (elementary 4-6 maybe) might use
> this as a starting point for research (see how many they can id). Or if
> your going to work with a folktale theme, this would be an excellent
> book.
>
> Kimberly Herbert
> CAM Administrator
> kimberly
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 9 Mar 1998 20:24:35 -0500 (EST)
> From: Fran Marze <fmaiu+@pitt.edu>
> Subject: Re: Fran's misinterpretation re.-dif. philosophy
>
> Actually, the social studies teacher asked me if I would help out. We are
> doing the work on our end. She is having a presentation and we will
> display the work. Community members will be there, too.
>
> Also, this teacher with colleagues organized a dress up day for teachers
> to come as favorite person in history and students in various history
> classes had to try and figure out the characters for a prize at the end of
> the day. I put together a Georgia Okeefe outfit, painted a papier mache
> deer head that someone left in our room white and carried it around,
> saying, Hey Al quit taking my picture. Some of the kids got it. I also
> slapped together a red poppy knock off. It was fun. Now I Have to come up
> with a good one for this year. I have to be comfortable so it has to be
> something that can be put together from regular stuff.
>
> One year a teacher of creative writing and I tried to put together a
> poem/calligraphy project. it worked ok. Maybe we'll try it again.
>
> Fran
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 9 Mar 1998 17:38:47 -0800 (PST)
> From: thekellys4
> Subject: Re: Music Teachers Association Web Site
>
> I am working with a foundation in urban Minneapolis to establish an arts academy for at-risk kids. I am interested in knowing if MTNA is aware of any model schools that I can learn about. Teresa Kelly
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 9 Mar 1998 18:45:00 -0700
> From: "ALPHAME" <ALPHAME>
> Subject: Re: artsednet-digest V2 #640
>
> New York art Why not have them make the biggest apple they
> can.........I'm not an art teacher but it could probably be done in
> different mediums.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 09 Mar 1998 19:51:27 -0600
> From: Kimberly Anne Herbert <kimberly>
> Subject: Re: New York
>
> I think that _Tar Beach_ which was reconmended in a previous post has a
> picture of the Brooklyn Bridge. Can you make a sculpture of the bridge?
> You might be able to intergrate with science or Social Studies. It has
> an interesting history. The workers (and engineer) suffered from the
> "bends", when they working on the foundation of the bridge. No one knew
> what was causing the pain the workers and engineer suffered from. The
> engineer was injured so baddly that he couldn't walk, see, and could
> barely talk. His wife took over the day to day supervision of the
> building of the bridge. He was feature in our "Child and the Hero"
> exhibit, but I can't recall his name. (I'm recovering from an allergic
> reaction and not thinking to clearlly)
> Kimberly Herbert
> CAM Administrator
> kimberly
>
> John M. Barrick wrote:
> >
> > Stacy,
> > Hi,I immediatly thought of Red Grooms a fabulous New York
> > Artist. While I was living there years ago he had a wonderful
> > installation in the city called"Ruckus Manhattan". If you can look at
> > the book. In short he made several environments you could walk through.
> > The themes varied, one was a subway,another was Stock exchange and of
> > course he did the Statue of liberty. He makes scaled down sculptures
> > which you can walk through. I've worked for years with preschool through
> > 8th and especially younger kids have a great learning experience as
> > well as having fun making large pieces which they can feel,touch and
> > work as a group doing. Perhaps dividing the kids into groups of 4 or 5
> > and making giant paper mache sculptures of skyscrapers,people,Taxi's
> > The Statue of Liberty. I don't know what your time frame is but it would
> > be a great cooperative project.
> >
> > Have fun,
> > Sandra
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 09 Mar 1998 20:49:49 -0800
> From: susan reynolds <reynolds>
> Subject: To be a good art educator does one have to be an artist.
>
> Hmmmmm.. Well from an artist's viewpoint who is not yet an art
> educator, I can't comment on this one. But I'm personally praying it
> doesn't hurt and that it might help.
>
> susan
>
> - --
>
> "The chief cause of failure and unhappiness is trading what we want most
> for what we want in the moment."
>
> *******************************************************************
>
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>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 9 Mar 1998 20:51:47 EST
> From: Pygment <Pygment>
> Subject: Re: (no subject)
>
> In a message dated 98-03-09 20:10:33 EST, fromkinr writes:
>
> << To be a good art educator does one have to be an artist >>
>
> Personally, I don't know of any art educators who aren't artists. When
> I was working on my art education certification at Buffalo State College,
> about one-third of my class already had a degree in the Studio Art, and were
> now adding the education courses onto it.
> I would say that in most cases (for there is always the exception),
> yes, one should be an artist. Not only does it come in handy when a student
> needs some guidance in rendering something, or you are teaching a particular
> technique, but it also helps set the tone of the class. What better example
> and inspiration could there be, than an artist who practices what they preach,
> and does so in full view of the students.
>
> Deb Meier-Sprague
> Batavia City Schools
> Batavia, NY
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 10 Mar 1998 12:52:46 +1000
> From: Bob Greaves <Robert.Greaves.au>
> Subject: Second World War.
>
> There is an illustrated children's book by JULIE VIVAS
> called "Let the Celebration Begin"
> It is about children in a concentration camp.
> It is about innocent children's play during horrific experiences.
> The illustrations are wonderful and rag dolls are the main theme.
> Julie Vivas is well known in Australain children's literature circles
> for the illustrations for Mim Fox's "Pussum Magic".
> Any good bookstore worth its salt should be able to get copies.
> I think Puffin are the publishers. Her illustration method is worth
> while studying too.
> Bob Greaves.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 09 Mar 1998 20:44:33 -0600
> From: Chaney <lchaney>
> Subject: Re: Mellisa Chaney Art Work/Prints
>
> Thank you! 100 times thank you.
>
> Melissa Chaney
>
> John M. Barrick wrote:
>
> > Mellisa,
> > In response to Art Prints. A local source for Northlight Books
> > Would be Coldsnow's Art supplies in KCMO. I worked there 7 years ago
> > we carried Northlight Books as well as several others. Also if you are
> > in KC drop by the Art Institute. Just a few blocks from Coldsnows
> > and across from the Art Gallery there are several people who could help
> > you there.
> > Bye,
> > Sandra
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 09 Mar 1998 20:58:13 -0600
> From: Chaney <lchaney>
> Subject: Re: Mellisa Chaney Art Work/Prints
>
> Chaney wrote:
>
> > Thank you! 100 times thank you.
> >
> > Melissa Chaney
> >
> > John M. Barrick wrote:
> >
> > > Mellisa,
> > > In response to Art Prints. A local source for Northlight Books
> > > Would be Coldsnow's Art supplies in KCMO. I worked there 7 years ago
> > > we carried Northlight Books as well as several others. Also if you are
> > > in KC drop by the Art Institute. Just a few blocks from Coldsnows
> > > and across from the Art Gallery there are several people who could help
> > > you there.
> > > Bye,
> > > Sandra
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 9 Mar 1998 22:02:22 EST
> From: RWilk85411 <RWilk85411>
> Subject: Re: (no subject)
>
> I don't think that it is absolutely necessary. But I question the
> effectiveness of someone who only knows about art and how it is made trying to
> teach students how to make good art. I think that art is an area where the
> teacher needs to be a doer. Of course there will always be the exception.
> That's what so wonderful about art.
> Reatha
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 9 Mar 1998 22:28:23 -0500
> From: "Mike Delaney" <edelaney>
> Subject: Re: Seventh Grade Ceramics
>
> Have you tied clay postcards? I used to do this project. They broke up
> into groups and they had to list who a person receives post card from.
> They then had to make a list of the type of pictures on a postcard. Some
> of the students had never received a postcard.
>
> They then had to design on paper 5X7 a postcard.
> This ended up being a relief tile made out of clay. You would have to
> demonstrade applique of two pieces of clay. we dry the clay with a hair
> dryer or fan. They then go back with a pencil and clean up the tile. If
> they get finidhed early they can turn it over on the back and write a note
> like a real postcard. I usually did this project one day, covvered in
> plastic. I put the whole classes on top of each other or in small stacks
> and covered with plastic. The next class setting they cleaned up the
> piece, wrote their note and then started on a small coil form. When they
> were finished to let dry I lined them up vertical in a deep art tray. The
> pieces dried without warping. I kep turning them and checking. I fired
> them standing on end so they wouldn't break or warp. I leaned one against
> the other. They an be glazed or they can be stained with watered down
> acrylics. what I do is water the acrylic paint myself and put in plastic
> peanut butter jars . This keeps all semster.
> Another project is to do a rock form. Small, handfull of clay. work with
> applying textures, adding bits of clay etc. Then on top of the rock they
> sculpt an animal and attach.. The next class stting they cut this rock into
> , follow a texture wave or something. Take popscycle sticks and have them
> tape wire to the end and carve out the inside. There you have a covered
> container. I fire these to stoneware and they stain with watered down
> acrylic or watercolor. They look wonderfyl.. We do sketches from zoo
> books borrowed from school library before starting. They have to draw the
> views of the ani,als feet, the head and back view, etc.
>
> Yet another one that turned outr real good. I found a coloring book on
> Kachina dolls. I ran those off. we then looked at Kachinas and they did a
> report from xerox copies I handed out. We devided into groups and each
> group made a poster for a different aspect of Kachinsa/ Like ceremony, what
> are kachinas, etc. Whatever I found information on. The students then
> worked in groups and made a poster and presented to the class. We then
> makde a Kacina by lining a yogurt cup with clay coils. I sprayed pam in
> first. The cclay came right out. Theyu smoothed the coile. We then made
> a small newpaper roll and wrapped clay around that and made a small
> cylinder.
> The upside clay yogurt cup or paper cup form sat on top of the cylinder
> form.. They then added arms that hugged the body, added a skirt around the
> middle, added long nose, hair, etc. They turn out neat too. After fired,
> you can paint and add old jewelry, feathers, leather and beads.
>
> enola from Indiana
>
> - ----------
> > From: Linda Stauffer <artistlps>
> > To: Arts Ed <artsednet.edu>
> > Subject: Seventh Grade Ceramics
> > Date: Monday, March 09, 1998 4:45 PM
> >
> > I am looking for a new project for seventh grade ceramics. The classes
> > are 40 min long every day. There are 30 kids in a class with 28 seats.
> > Classes are of mixed ability. Projects cannot be too large- storage
> > space is at a minimum. Any suggestions?
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 9 Mar 1998 22:31:09 EST
> From: Mcracker <Mcracker>
> Subject: Re: Seventh Grade Ceramics
>
> Linda-
> I have had good success this year with having seventh graders make clay hands
> following several sessions drawing their hands in various poses. So far they
> have all had success, although the construction is a bit tricky. We have used
> slab construction for the arm and wrist and the palm, which we made like a
> folded over pocket. I demonstrate a technique that has worked for me, but
> allow for innovative approaches. One boy made the arm using coils and it
> worked very well. I especially loke the expressive quality of the finished
> hands. We've been using white clay and have left them unglazed. This project
> has been complex enough to challenge, but do-able for all! In the past, we've
> made shoes following a drawing sequence also. My sixth graders are making clay
> masks, which does not require as much storage or as complicated a construction
> process. Tied in with a study of Africa....Good luck.
> Marcia
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 10 Mar 1998 00:28:14 -0500 (EST)
> From: Wade Cox <wc21808>
> Subject: Re: (no subject)
>
> I would have to say that an art educator does not have to be an artist
> at all... but then I question that persons motivation for teaching. If
> I'm not interested in Math whatsoever, I am most likely not going to
> teach it. If a teacher is not interested in what they are teaching, then
> the quality and effectiveness of the teaching will suffer, and so will
> the students. SO.....I sure hope that aret educators will be artists as
> well, in some form or fashion......
>
> Wade Cox
> wc21808
> www.appstate.edu/~wc21808
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 09 Mar 1998 21:13:30 -0500
> From: "Diane L." <mselle>
> Subject: Stubby / Asian brush painting
>
> One way to teach asian brush painting on the elementary level is to have
> supplies ready, bamboo brushes, liquid sumi-e ink, and non-absorbant
> (shinny rice paper) the absorbant paper is too difficult for new comers)
> Students should have a peice of newsprint paper under rice paper to absorb
> and excess water from brush. hand out very small amts of ink ( a couple of
> drops in a small container) hand out small containers of water, 1/4cup.
> tack up a piece of paper on black board or bulletin in front of class.
> Assuming you know how to handle ink and brush, Demonstrate the following:
> >From the Four Gentlemen ( the four seasons)
> Bamboo - summer
> Orchid - spring
> Chrysanthmum -fall
> plum blossom - winter
>
> do one per lesson. first demonstrate. have them watch.
> then have them paint with you. As you do the stroke they do it. Sort of
> like painting with Bob Ross. explain that the compostion is simple and off
> center in Asian art. When they are finished tell them to bring the work up
> to you forming a line. When you get the work you write their name
> vertically at an approprate spot in the compostion, in fine black marker
> giving it an Asian appearance of calligraphy. ( if you have a red stamp
> such as a small insect, you can pretend it is a seal, or chop (Asian
> signature stamp) and stamp near their name.) upon returning to their seats,
> while waiting for you to finish up with the rest of the students, they
> are permitted to do free painting in Asian manner using the newspring or
> other available paper. You need to do this because they might destroy the
> painting if they put their own name on it rice paper is fragile, and if
> they don't have a name on it you and probably them also won't be able to
> tell them apart. When class is over, mount them on black construcion
> paper, precut, one inch border is fine. You can use staples. pardon the
> spelling and grammer in a hurry. Sincerely, Diane L.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of artsednet-digest V2 #641
> *******************************
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This is in response to the query "to be a good art educator does one
have to be an artist". I am an elementary art teacher who teaches with
3 other art teachers K-12 who are not practicing artists. I have always
maintained a professional level art career on the side, as well as being
a founder and president of a local arts council, and a member of state,
national and regional arts groups. None of my collegues have picked up
a brush since they were in college, over 25 years ago in most instances.
None of them belong to thier state or national associations or attend
conferences relating to thier profession. Two of them are art minors,
which may explain thier lack of interest in such things, but in my
opinion, it weakens thier programs as a result. My belief is that
without maintaining an interest in art and the process of making art,
one cannot empathize with or have a feeling for the nuance of
creativity. Art, unlike math or science, has a dual responsibility for
those who teach it. The passion you want to foster in kids to learn and
love art is directly related to the passion you as a teacher have for
art. Walk the talk, and you will have not only instant credibility with
your students, but you will be a better teacher to boot! Jerry

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