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Lesson Plans


Re: artsednet-digest V2 #627

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
John M. Barrick (astroboy)
Wed, 04 Mar 1998 15:59:32 -0500


artsednet-digest wrote:
>Reply to Katherine JOHN BIGGERS
This is my first reply on this discussion group.
I just completed a year and a half as an Art literacy coordinator,
I am a painter and a past muralist. One of my favorite artists is
Diego Rivera which was one of the Artist in Art Lit. If you are
unfamiliar with this program it will help in your problem. Since you are
already in the Getty page look up DBEA lesson plans. This is a program
which has been put together to Educate children in school on the Arts
The lesson plans are broken up into different catagories. Aesthetic,
production, etc. Basically it is a way to go into any classroom and
educate children on an Artist or culture. You start with the history of
the Artist, then discussion, Slide show and finally the project.
Look up a lesson plan and it will show you how a lesson has been put
together. Try to find a mural lesson plan and incorporate it to your
Artist. I know the Diego Rivera Lesson involves a class Mural project or
even a whole school project. Also look up what is published on DBAE
because there are books under 20$ which will show you how to do several
projects. Hope this helps. I grew up in PA in Yardley (Bucks County).
Sorry about the rambling We just bought this computer and I am totally
illiterate about them.
> artsednet-digest Wednesday, March 4 1998 Volume 02 : Number 627
>
> This edition includes :
> Re: dummy parts/mannequins
> re: "The Story Nobody Knows"
> Re: life drawing classes/ secondary level
> Get another paper
> Re: racist comment
> Re: "The Story Nobody Knows"
> Re: Murals
> taking them out of art class
> Re: "The Story Nobody Knows"
> Re: kids that destroy their work
> Re: Portfolio Reviews
> Re: life drawing classes/ secondary level
> Re: kids that destroy their work
> Re: kids that destroy their work
> kids that destroy their work
> JOHN BIGGERS
> Artists Arrested
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 3 Mar 1998 19:55:28 -0800 (PST)
> From: Sidnie Miller <sidmill.us>
> Subject: Re: dummy parts/mannequins
>
> Dear Marc, you could call up department store in your area and see
> if they have any broken mannequins that they are going to discard. In
> almost any area they are sought after--thrift stores want them too. I
> have talked to our local museum which has several old Penney's mannequins
> that are a little outdated. They let me borrow them, but it's kind of
> scary--they're heavy and a natural target for kids to mess with. The
> great looking, realistic ones are unbelievably expensive.
>
> ###########################
> # Sidnie Miller #
> # Elko Junior High School #
> # 777 Country Club Drive #
> # Elko, NV 89801 #
> # 702-738-7236 #
> ###########################
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 3 Mar 1998 23:08:25 -0500
> From: (Mark Alexander) mamjam
> Subject: re: "The Story Nobody Knows"
>
> At 10:16 PM 3/3/98, Mark Alexander wrote:
> > I use other artist's works to illustrate concepts- so why not illustators?
>
> Okay, everyone!
>
> I hope you all understand that I did NOT mean to imply that illustrators
> were not artists! I just read this last post and realized it didn't sound
> as I had intended. Some of my best friends are illustrators! Sorry! This
> email sure is an immediate medium! I'll take a bath for this one, I'm
> sure!
>
> Mark
>
> SWIMMING IN DENIAL
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 3 Mar 1998 20:08:37 -0800 (PST)
> From: Sidnie Miller <sidmill.us>
> Subject: Re: life drawing classes/ secondary level
>
> Boy--you couldn't do that here. Check first with your admin.--then
> each parent of each student. Then figure out how you can protect
> your models from gawkers, office aides, janitors etc. Sounds like
> it would be a better plan to set up an evening class outside of
> school to which your seniors can be invited--and pay for life drawing.
>
> ###########################
> # Sidnie Miller #
> # Elko Junior High School #
> # 777 Country Club Drive #
> # Elko, NV 89801 #
> # 702-738-7236 #
> ###########################
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 04 Mar 1998 20:17:34 -0800
> From: Lynda Brothers Matthew <brosart>
> Subject: Get another paper
>
> Thank you Kevin
>
> I agree about the extra paper, and paper is cheap compared to other
> supplies. I guess the issue is more, "I made this line (first line of the
> drawing) and it doesn't go where I want it to go, so I want to start over
> again" syndrome. There is the creativity of taking that first line and
> making it into something else. But it's also training to think before
> doing. I don't care if a child has decided that the drawing doesn't work!
> That is just as, or more valuable than deciding that the piece is a
> masterpice! I try to tell all of my students that it's all an exercise,
> like trying to learn to ride a bike. The more you practice the better you
> get. But when students throw away a paper after putting down only one or
> two lines, it's like giving the bike to someone else and saying "forget
> it!" But the worst to me, and how this whole thread started, was that a
> student would spend a whole hour on a great creative piece and then
> sabotage it. I realize I have a group that has problems. I just want them
> to start to value their time input, and see it as something to grow on, not
> throw away at a whim. So I will try to keep portfolios this next 8 week
> session. Yes!
>
> And do I keep what I draw all of the time? Not on your life. Plus I
> wouldn't want someone to see my scribblings, so I make sure they aren't
> left around are hidden from view as I also teach adults in my studio, but I
> do assess the ones that are visual thoughts to something else and save
> those. I guess students should be left a sense of value as well, as to what
> they want to save, and what was not a good use of time or mind.
>
> Do I have conflicting values here? Yep!
>
> Can we teach young students to think like older artists? Save things, work
> and rework thoughts, come back to drawings three years hence, improve, grow
> the thought, add maturity, insight, different media? Nothing is difinitive?
> No artwork is really finished, even if on exhibit in a gallery, it's still
> a work in progress. Those ideals are what art is all about to me.
>
> As a case in point, my son and I were recently going through stuff I kept
> of his when he was in elementary school. He couldn't remember any of it,
> but one piece caught his eye (he is now 17) and he took that thought and
> created a whole new beautiful artwork.
>
> I think we need to be honest with our art students, and let them know what
> it's like to be an artist. The trials, tests, mis-adventures are all part
> of the developement, as are the lack of funds for more paper, pastels,
> markers, watercolors. It's all part of the life and times. If I won the
> lottery tomorrow, my students would have a sink in the room (we don't, and
> I change rooms every 8 weeks) great reproductions all around, field trips
> to the Getty and elsewhere, videos galore, and lots and lots of supplies.
> What would someone else add?
>
> Sorry for the rant and venting,
> Lynda
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 3 Mar 1998 20:17:45 -0800 (PST)
> From: Sidnie Miller <sidmill.us>
> Subject: Re: racist comment
>
> I see a lot of "you're just picking on me cuz I'm brown" around here.
> It's almost impossible to deal with because you can't prove that you
> are or are not prejudiced. One year I said "oh yeah--well you're just
> giving me a hard time cuz I'm an old white lady". I thought it was
> pretty funny--everyone enjoyed it, but in the end--it just escalated
> things. I think the best plan is to consistently act like a teacher--
> say I'm picking on you because you're acting like a jerk--I pick on
> anyone who does so. Stop and analyze yourself--make sure that you
> aren't favoring any one group--it's really easy for me to favor and
> give more attention to the boys because the squeeky wheel gets the
> grease. There have been years when I've been intimidated by some
> of the Mexican kids who were particularly "gang-like" and I was
> staying away from them. You get a reputation eventually and it's
> passed down. I told some of the native american kids that my husband
> is part Indian--and it's amazing how much my status has improved.
>
> ###########################
> # Sidnie Miller #
> # Elko Junior High School #
> # 777 Country Club Drive #
> # Elko, NV 89801 #
> # 702-738-7236 #
> ###########################
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 03 Mar 1998 20:42:03 -0800
> From: "Griswold, Charlotte" <griswald>
> Subject: Re: "The Story Nobody Knows"
>
> Mark, keep your head up, that ole Nile can be cruel to the unwary!
> Charlotte
> - --
> Denial is ok, as long as you know you're in it!
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 4 Mar 1998 08:49:13 -0500
> From: rojul (Rosa Juliusdottir)
> Subject: Re: Murals
>
> Ciao Marilyn. What a great thing the Mural work you did with your kids
> sounds. Great idea! I cannot wait to see it whenever I get down your way.
> I have done murals on paper with my kids. Quite large ones two mtr. high
> and three og more wide. I devide the kids in groups and some begin painting
> the background while others do the images that are two be on the background
> on different pieces of paper. Then we cut the images out and build the
> picture together, everyone has to agree where everything goes. The images
> are pasted on the background. We always work from a theme we have studied
> before like; the ocean or an enchanted forest etc. It is fun and the
> "Murals" have been wonderful.
> Best regards from the far north, Rosa
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 3 Mar 1998 23:25:25 -1000
> From: David Zimmerman <fastedy>
> Subject: taking them out of art class
>
> We had a problem for a while at my high school with the counselors taking
> kids out for conferences during art class. They had a mandate from the
> principal to interface with every student after every report card and they
> decided art was the least likely to impact their academic achievement. I
> complained a lot but in a constructive way. I finally got the counseling
> staff and administration to agree to a rotation. Counselors had to
> document which classes the kids had been taken from in their file and it
> was up to the counselors to never duplicate a class the entire year.
>
> Eventually few students were taken from my classes and the counselors
> agreed to limit all appointments to five minutes. If there was something
> to be discussed, they would make appointments for lunch or after school.
>
> Deb Rosenbaum
>
> Always take time to stop and smell the roses... and sooner or later,
> you'll inhale a bee.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 4 Mar 1998 05:35:04 EST
> From: RWilk85411 <RWilk85411>
> Subject: Re: "The Story Nobody Knows"
>
> Why don't you write a story of your own. Just a thought.
> Reatha
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 4 Mar 1998 05:42:26 EST
> From: RWilk85411 <RWilk85411>
> Subject: Re: kids that destroy their work
>
> You made an excellent point that I overlooked in my comments. I know that
> supplies are dear and more than dear in a lot of situations. I know that
> students need to learn to use the eraser. But I think that one sheet of paper
> is all you get is somewhat disheartening. I am fortunate in that I have a
> generous budget. I also get paper from a local publisher. I try very hard to
> make my students to understand the virtue of the eraser. But at some point in
> time it is necessary to throw the darn thing away. Or in my case put it in the
> portfolio for consideration along with the finished piece. Of course I do have
> my biggest problem with the students who come from teachers who tell them that
> real artists do not use erasers!
> Reatha
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 4 Mar 1998 05:51:34 EST
> From: RWilk85411 <RWilk85411>
> Subject: Re: Portfolio Reviews
>
> What a coincidence portfolios are really on my mind lately. In April I am
> hosting our first annual portfolio review for all high school students in our
> county and two others. I have representatives from several colleges and
> universities and local art oriented businesses ( ad agencies, galleries, a
> billboard company) coming to give a presentation on the importance of a well
> designed portfolio and how to achieve that. After the presentation they will
> meet with students in a one-on-one setting to go over whatever they have
> brought as a portfolio. Each student will leave with a checklist of sorts that
> will list their strengths, weaknesses, and suggested improvements. They will
> know how to use their portfolio to get into school, get a scholarship and get
> a job. I am hoping that this will become an annual event.
> Reatha
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 4 Mar 1998 05:54:58 EST
> From: RWilk85411 <RWilk85411>
> Subject: Re: life drawing classes/ secondary level
>
> Got to agree with Sid on this one. I would be selling pencils on the street
> corner within hours.
> Reatha
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 04 Mar 1998 07:06:57 -0400
> From: Wendy Manning <wmanning>
> Subject: Re: kids that destroy their work
>
> KChamb28 wrote:
> >
> > Some of these replies on this subject are really discouraging. Has no one here
> > gotten discouraged eith a drawing and thrown it away and started over, painted
> > over a canvas and begun again, thrown a bad pot and squashed and begun again?
> > Why are children being treated so differently. If this is happening again and
> > again, might you ask yourself "Am I doing something wrong in theenviornment
> > I'm creating here? Is there something going on in this kid's life that's
> > coming out here?"
> > Anyway, rigid rules on paper and putting it where kid's can't get it sounds
> > bizzare to me.
> > Sign me .. Go ahead,get another piece of paper & try again, Kevin
>
> Yes, if they're genuinely discouraged. I tell them, "You can start
> over but don't throw this out yet. Keep it in the file and write on the
> back (this is if working on the back is not a option) that you're
> starting another one. That way I know you've been working."
> Sometimes they end up finishing the first one after all, or finishing
> both.Don't you ever find that if you put a work away for a while the
> solution to the problem pops up after you've had a break from it?
> If they're repeatedly throwing throwing away perfectly good work in
> progress we need to help them have faith in themselves ,give them extra
> positive reinforcement. Allowing them to continue destroying their work
> won't help.
> But having "rigid" rules on paper isn't so bizarre if there's a finite
> amount of paper and a limited budget. I found that many of my students
> would take 3 or 4 sheets of good paper and no scrap paper for planning,
> scribble on the good paper and then throw it out. I asked them to do
> some math: "Ok, if all 270 grade sevens wasted 2 sheets of paper, how
> much paper is used up ? Can you see that I'll be out of paper by April?"
> I got tired of saying that but it helped a lot because they weren't
> really aware of the consequences of their actions.
> Sign me...Getting low on paper, Wendy
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 4 Mar 1998 09:30:56 -0500 (EST)
> From: Fran Marze <fmaiu+@pitt.edu>
> Subject: Re: kids that destroy their work
>
> I had to stay home today since my husband was really ill last night and I
> was so tired by midnight. aNyway I'm taking a break from laundry and
> cathing up on cleaning and income tax prep to answer email. I think we
> have to make a good compromise between one line on a paper and a kid
> throwing it away and teaching them how to conserve without stiffling them.
> I have them save old drawings, etc. that they don;t like at the time for a
> future collage project. We do thumbnails, use erasers, gesso over canvas,
> use block out white for areas on acrylics, etc. etc. but sometimes,
> starting over is the only viable alternative. I took a community college
> course from a young man who is a professional portrait artist and he said
> a lot of "startovers" are important in portrait drawing. Sometimes we can
> belabor a work and it gets just too worked over and a fresh start. is
> important. I say learning takes place in the mistakes, too. Let's have a
> happy medium between waste and lock step pressures. i think we can work
> within that parameter. franWhat is this? Real artists don't use erasers.
> help me on this one!
>
> On Wed, 4 Mar 1998, RWilk85411 wrote:
>
> > You made an excellent point that I overlooked in my comments. I know that
> > supplies are dear and more than dear in a lot of situations. I know that
> > students need to learn to use the eraser. But I think that one sheet of paper
> > is all you get is somewhat disheartening. I am fortunate in that I have a
> > generous budget. I also get paper from a local publisher. I try very hard to
> > make my students to understand the virtue of the eraser. But at some point in
> > time it is necessary to throw the darn thing away. Or in my case put it in the
> > portfolio for consideration along with the finished piece. Of course I do have
> > my biggest problem with the students who come from teachers who tell them that
> > real artists do not use erasers!
> > Reatha
> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 04 Mar 1998 07:29:12 -0400
> From: Wendy Manning <wmanning>
> Subject: kids that destroy their work
>
> > KChamb28 wrote:
> > >
> > > Some of these replies on this subject are really discouraging. Has no one here
> > > gotten discouraged eith a drawing and thrown it away and started over, painted
> > > over a canvas and begun again, thrown a bad pot and squashed and begun again?
> > > Why are children being treated so differently. If this is happening again and
> > > again, might you ask yourself "Am I doing something wrong in theenviornment
> > > I'm creating here? Is there something going on in this kid's life that's
> > > coming out here?"
> > > Anyway, rigid rules on paper and putting it where kid's can't get it sounds
> > > bizzare to me.
> > > Sign me .. Go ahead,get another piece of paper & try again, Kevin
>
> Yes, if they're genuinely discouraged. I tell them, "You can start
> over but don't throw this out yet. Keep it in the file and write on the
> back (this is if working on the back is not a option) that you're
> starting another one. That way I know you've been working."
> Sometimes they end up finishing the first one after all, or finishing
> both.Don't you ever find that if you put a work away for a while the
> solution to the problem pops up after you've had a break from it?
> If they're repeatedly throwing throwing away perfectly good work in
> progress we need to help them have faith in themselves ,give them extra
> positive reinforcement. Allowing them to continue destroying their work
> won't help.
>
> But having "rigid" rules on paper isn't so bizarre if there's a
> finite
> amount of paper and a limited budget. I found that many of my students
> would take 3 or 4 sheets of good paper and no scrap paper for planning,
> scribble on the good paper and then throw it out. I asked them to do
> some math: "Ok, if all 270 grade sevens wasted 2 sheets of paper, how
> much paper is used up ? Can you see that I'll be out of paper by
> April?"
> I got tired of saying that but it helped a lot because they weren't
> really aware of the consequences of their actions.
> Sign me...Getting low on paper, Wendy
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 04 Mar 1998 10:09:48 -0500
> From: Kathryn <klm231>
> Subject: JOHN BIGGERS
>
> Hello everyone, I am a student at Penn State and I am currently taking an
> art education course. We are creating a lesson plan to present to our class
> based on a work of an artist. I chose to use John Biggers because he had
> attended Penn State and we have a few of his murals displayed on campus. I
> am focusing on his murals "Day of the Harvest" and "Night of the Poor,"
> which are at Penn State and I was wondering if anyone could give me ideas on
> lessons or possible directions I could move in approaching his work and tie
> in other disciplines. Or if anyone can offer information on this wonderful
> man or help me in locating sources for my reasearch it would be a tremendous
> help. Is there a way I could contact John Biggers himself, even? Thank you
> very much for your help and support.......Kathryn
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 4 Mar 1998 10:47:23 EST
> From: Sheridanpa <Sheridanpa>
> Subject: Artists Arrested
>
> FOR YOUR INFORMATION:
>
> Artists Arrested During Protest Outside
> Metropolitan Museum Of Art
>
> More than fifty police officers from numerous Manhattan
> Precincts and a large contingent of Parks Enforcement officers
> were called into action yesterday as the Parks Department
> attempted day one of enforcing an artist permit system in front
> of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Members of A.R.T.I.S.T.
> (Artists’ Response To Illegal State Tactics) set up their art
> displays in defiance of a block long police barrier and began a
> protest that lasted from eight A.M. until six P.M.
>
> By nine A.M. the police had begun confiscating original art,
> stuffing it into black plastic garbage bags and issuing
> summonses ranging from two hundred to one thousand dollars
> to the artists. More than 100 works of art were confiscated from the sixteen
> artists who received summonses. Works of art were ripped out of artists’ hands
> and torn out of closed portfolios and displays by Parks Enforcement officers
> and uniformed police.
> The police arrived on the scene in N.Y.P.D. vans at least one of which bore
> the logo, Donated by The Central Park Conservancy.
> The confiscations and summonses arbitrarily stopped as soon as
> two television news crews and four newspaper reporters arrived
> on the scene at 10 A.M.
>
> The artists, many of whom are immigrants and political refugees
> from China, the former Soviet Union and various Latin
> American dictatorships, made speeches in their native languages
> about freedom of expression, describing it as the main reason
> they came to America. The police were verbally confronted by
> numerous local residents and visitors to the museum including a
> German tourist who likened the police action to those of the
> Gestapo in Nazi Germany.
>
> A.R.T.I.S.T. President Robert Lederman was arrested after he
> used a piece of chalk to write, Giuliani=Police State and God
> Bless America on the sidewalk in front of the police barricades.
> As the police attempted to drag Lederman across Fifth Avenue
> to a waiting police car approximately 100 artists surged over the
> barricades and swarmed around the police. As Lederman, 47
> was handcuffed and forced into the car artists surrounded the
> police car and began chanting, let him go. Other artists laid
> down in front of the car and prevented it from leaving. After a
> few minutes the police unhandcuffed Lederman on the condition
> that he calm the angry crowd. Lederman then asked the artists if they were
> willing to give up their rights to which they loudly responded no. Lederman
> led the artists back across Fifth Avenue and into the barricades where they
> began chanting Artist Power. Four police and Parks Enforcement officers then
> re-arrested Lederman and charged him with inciting a riot,
> unlawful assembly and disorderly conduct. One other protester,
> Antonio La Russia 27, an employee of the museum, was
> charged along with Lederman with defacement of property with
> chalk. Two artists, Mitchell Balmuth, 51 and Aki Davis were
> charged with disorderly conduct and inciting a riot.
>
> Lederman says the Parks Department is acting in contempt of
> court, referring to a 1996 Federal Court ruling which said that
> based on the First Amendment’s protection of speech, artists
> need no license or permit to create, display or sell paintings,
> photographs, limited edition prints or sculptures on public
> property. The Parks Department was a named defendant in the
> case along with Mayor Giuliani and the N.Y.P.D.
>
> Parks Department Commissioner Henry Stern is quoted in a
> 2/26/98 Newsday article as saying that, “These are extremely
> valuable spaces, and people who sell hot dogs there pay
> $150,000 a year for the privilege and may not like having to set up next to an
> artist who is there for free.” Lederman calls that the main issue. “It’s a
> matter of $150,000 to sell hot dogs vs.free speech.”
>
> The Metropolitan Museum’s President, William Leurs and
> Director, Phillipe de Montebello issued a joint statement last
> Friday distancing themselves from the Parks Departments’
> policy while declining to take any action to prevent what they
> described as the planned arrests and confiscations of art. On
> Friday police officers went into the museum for twenty minutes
> and then arrested Lederman for writing Stop Harassing Artists
> with chalk on the sidewalk in front of the museum.
>
> On Sunday, as soon as the art confiscations began, artists began handing out
> leaflets with a penny taped to it, advising museum goers that the Met didn’t
> care about artists and that to support their protest visitors should pay only
> one cent admission. The Met receives City funds and is located on City
> property, making their suggested eight dollar admission voluntary, and
> admission possible for as little as one cent.
>
> More than 5,000 of the leaflets
> were distributed on Sunday in what the artists promise to be an
> ongoing protest. The Metropolitan Museum was the only major
> New York City art museum that refused to support the artists in
> their lawsuit. According to Lederman the museum has so far
> also refused to issue a statement supporting artists’ First
> Amendment rights on public property or the decision in their
> Federal lawsuit, granting them full First Amendment protection.
>
> For information contact:Robert Lederman, President of
> A.R.T.I.S.T. (Artists: Response To Illegal State Tactics)
> (718) 369-2111
> E-Mail: ARTISTpres
> Read the 2nd circuit ruling at our web site:
> http://www.openair.org/alerts/artist/nyc.html
> Parks Commissioner Henry J. Stern (212) 360-1305, Thomas
> Rozinski, General Counsel Parks Department (212) 360-1314
> William Leurs, President Metropolitan Museum of Art (212)
> 570-3900, Ashton Hawkins, Legal Counsel Metropolitan
> Museum of Art (212) 570-3936, Central Park Conservancy
> (212) 315-0385
>
> Also see NY Times 3/2/98 Metro section B1; Newsday 3/2/98
> pg.A7; Village Voice 2/24/98 pg. 57
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of artsednet-digest V2 #627
> *******************************
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