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Lesson Plans


Re: Questions to Sandy skoglund

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Sandy Skoglund (MMurdock)
Thu, 21 Mar 1996 11:04:30 -0800


Below is a transcription of Sandy Skoglund's responses to your
questions:

Where do you get the animals and 3-D objects you use in your pieces?

I make the animals myself. Most of the animals that are in my work are
handmade. There are many found objects in my work that I get from the
Salvation Army or department stores.

Are these only installations or are they considered a sculpture?

The work is an installation which is a three-dimensional room sized
environment. The sculptures of the animals which I make and that go into
the installation, I also consider to be sculpture. When I'm making a
sculpture that's going to go into an installation I look at it as I am making a
sculpture and not props. I think that's an important distinction that I do see
the individual pieces in themselves as works of art.

Do you photograph your pieces and then use the photographs as your
art?

I photograph the pieces and installations myself. I don't feel that since I
took the photographs means that everything else is meaningless and that
only the photograph is the work of art. I don't think the taking of a
photograph cancels out the meaning and impact of the thing that you
photographed. I end up with a hybrid existence where the photograph
represents the work in a certain way, and the installation represents the
work in a certain way.

How do you determine the number of animals, fish or images to be used?

The individual sculptures are often exhibited alone. The number of
animals or fish that's in the work is dependent upon the filling up of the
space. I'm thinking about the space as photographic space or as being a
rectangle that gets filled up by these shapes. In the end that gives me a
goal and I usually overreach the goal.

What do you want the viewer to get from observing your work?

I want the viewer to remember the work visually and carry away an
image in his or her mind's eye.

In "Fox Games," why is one fox gray?

In "Fox Games" the changing of one fox and painting it gray is meant to
allude to the idea of camouflage. We see certain things first and second,
based often on color. Camouflage also pertains to the issues of racism
and sexism where physical appearance either causes someone to blend
in with our consciousness or causes them to stand out in our
consciousness.

>>> Nathan Little <littlen@sun-link.com> 03/04/96 04:46pm >>>
Where do you get the animals and 3-d objects you use in your pieces?
Are these only installations or are they considered a sculpture?
Do you photograph your pieces and then use the photographs as your
art?
How do you determine the number of animals, fish or images to be
used?
What do you want the viewer to get from observing your work?
In Fox Games why is one fox gray?