Note: To protect the privacy of our members, e-mail addresses have been removed from the archived messages. As a result, some links may be broken.

Lesson Plans


Re: Teaching Art

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
henry (taylorh)
Sun, 03 Mar 1996 20:13:49 -0700 (MST)


On Wed, 28 Feb 1996, Bob Greaves wrote:

> The problem is that generally, most people want young children to
> produce symbols that are adult directed which can lead later to the
> "I can't draw" syndrome and the "that is why I don't like doing art".

Good point Bob! It is amazing how early kids "know" they can't draw or
don't like art. I've had them in 1st and 2nd grade art classes.
Considering how driven even the pre-K kids can be when it comes to art I
have to think that the desire and interest have been stolen away before
they came into my class (or else I'm incredibly boring from the very start
and the problem myself) I do think you nail it when you say "produce
symbols that are adult directed" Some of these kids are well aware that
they can't produce the disney quality images of the coloring books they
are dealt and are willing to assume that if they can't draw like that
from the start they aren't cut out to be artists. Some of them have just
been helped and "corrected" into their lack of enthusiasm.

Considering the extent that child art has influenced the modernists it is
amazing that our curriculum has so frequently avoided (yes sometimes we
do do sessions on Klee, Miro and Chagall) that _spirit_of_abandon_ that
adults must find to attempt such art. I've seen kids in Miro units
carefully trying to replicate the "Miro" line! Not with too much artistic
enthusiasm in their eyes either.

The analytical and cognative components of the arts often come before or
after but not during the act of production. How do we as teachers share
this with the children? How do we loosen them up access and engage the
intuitive engine that moves a studious piece of draftsmanship into a
fluid and alive work of art?

In the mood tonight As I clean out the mail box...
henry