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RE:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: March 08, 2012

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From: Barkatsas, Constantina C (barkatsas.constantina.c_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Fri Mar 09 2012 - 14:43:47 PST


the acropolis museum is amazing for all kind of information

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From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest [teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu]
Sent: Friday, 9 March 2012 7:00 PM
To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: March 08, 2012

TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Thursday, March 08, 2012.

1. Greek and Roman Architecture and Today
2. FW: Greek and Roman Architecture and Today
3. Re: Greek and Roman Architecture and Today
4. Re: Greek and Roman Architecture and Today
5. Re: Greek and Roman Architecture and Today
6. Re: Greek and Roman Architecture and Today

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Subject: Greek and Roman Architecture and Today
From: sarah k <sarah.kerns3@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 8 Mar 2012 07:31:37 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

My seventh grade students are currently studying Ancient Greece and
Rome. I would like to complete an architecture lesson focused on the
influence of the style on buildings in the U.S. I plan to take the
students through a "photo tour" of our city then ask them to design a
new building for the city that includes aspects of Greek and/or Roman
architecture.
Does anyone have suggestions for materials to complete this activity
(watercolor, pen and ink, pencil) or suggestions for resources for me
to check out before presenting the background information to the
students? I have never taught architecture or Greek or Roman art, but
both are a part of the curriculum at my new school.
Feel free to email me off the list.
Thank you!

Sarah Kerns
Quincy, MA

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Subject: FW: Greek and Roman Architecture and Today
From: San D Hasselman <shasselman@hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 8 Mar 2012 15:00:52 +0000
X-Message-Number: 2

 Hi Sarah
 I taught AP Art History which covers architecture. There are so many elements to teaching architecture that if I were you I would reduce it down to the main ones.

Greek
 Columns (3 types) plus carytids
 Pediments
 Frieze
 Portico
 Ampitheater

Roman
 Arches (including aquaducts, bridges, triumphal arches)
 Barrel vault, groin vault
 Colosseum
 Concrete (use of)
 Domes
 City planning in general

I would have my students bring their sketchbooks and thin line markers (so they can't get so fussy and spend time erasing all of the time, when they should be looking). Perhaps I would even have them use different color markers for different things. So for example if they did a quick sketch of the local bank facade (which might be neoclassical, with columns, etc), I would have them do the columns in one color and if it had a pediment (in another), and if the doorway was arched, in another.

San D

> Date: Thu, 8 Mar 2012 07:31:37 -0500
> Subject: [teacherartexchange] Greek and Roman Architecture and Today
> From: sarah.kerns3@gmail.com
> To: teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu
>
> My seventh grade students are currently studying Ancient Greece and
> Rome. I would like to complete an architecture lesson focused on the
> influence of the style on buildings in the U.S. I plan to take the
> students through a "photo tour" of our city then ask them to design a
> new building for the city that includes aspects of Greek and/or Roman
> architecture.
> Does anyone have suggestions for materials to complete this activity
> (watercolor, pen and ink, pencil) or suggestions for resources for me
> to check out before presenting the background information to the
> students? I have never taught architecture or Greek or Roman art, but
> both are a part of the curriculum at my new school.
> Feel free to email me off the list.
> Thank you!
>
> Sarah Kerns
> Quincy, MA
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Greek and Roman Architecture and Today
From: Peggy Woolsey <eoolspeg@nbnet.nb.ca>
Date: Thu, 8 Mar 2012 12:30:47 +0000
X-Message-Number: 3

Hi Sarah,
I always made architecture an important part of my high school
curriculum. I approached the unit in a building block sort of way. I
think the following could be adapted to middle school:
First, columns. There is so much history in the orders. I included
Minoan with Doric, Ionic, Corinthian, Caryatids, because Minoan
pillars (so called, inverted) are so distinctive and are so
mysterious. (Arthur Evans wrote that they were stand-ins for the the
Goddess). I had students look at images of the various types of
columns and draw them. There are some great youtube films on the
building of the Parthenon and so on. Next, the gable roof of Greek and
Roman temples and civic buildings can be found in the standard post
and beam wood houses of the recent past in N. America. The standard
Greek pattern is everywhere around us. Have students look in their own
homes and neighbourhoods for these elements. Following the gable roof
of the early Greeks, the Romans developed the arch (arguably invented
by the Etruscans) and architecture took off. The arch made possible
large buildings, bridges, aqueducts and so on--the basis of our
Western architectural heritage. I constructed a set of wedged blocks
for students to make a free standing arch--always fascinating how that
keystone keeps everything together. After enough explorations (gothic
cathedrals, skyscrapers, etc. etc. however long your time is), I
finished the unit by having students create a blueprint of a building
that incorporated a choice of elements, that should be structurally
sound (lots of playing with straws and newspapers), aesthetically
pleasing, and purposeful. They would write up the elements used and
for what reasons. Sky's the limit on the exciting world of
architecture. There are lots of resources on line now. Have a great
time.
Peggy, 2 years retired and missing it sometimes.

On 8-Mar-12, at 12:31 PM, sarah k wrote:

> My seventh grade students are currently studying Ancient Greece and
> Rome. I would like to complete an architecture lesson focused on the
> influence of the style on buildings in the U.S. I plan to take the
> students through a "photo tour" of our city then ask them to design a
> new building for the city that includes aspects of Greek and/or Roman
> architecture.
> Does anyone have suggestions for materials to complete this activity
> (watercolor, pen and ink, pencil) or suggestions for resources for me
> to check out before presenting the background information to the
> students? I have never taught architecture or Greek or Roman art, but
> both are a part of the curriculum at my new school.
> Feel free to email me off the list.
> Thank you!
>
> Sarah Kerns
> Quincy, MA
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html

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Subject: Re: Greek and Roman Architecture and Today
From: Marvin Bartel <marvinpb@goshen.edu>
Date: Thu, 8 Mar 2012 15:47:57 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

Sarah,

This is a great challenge. If I were coaching it, after showing the classical designs of older buildings in their city, I might explain and motivate with contemporary musical examples, but no contemporary visual examples. Music mashups can explain the concept of much postmodern design. They would more likely understand how postmodern design emerges as well as understand a creative process if they have to transpose from one art form to another. Then after they had completed their project, I would review by showing postmodern professional architecture.

Their project would be to compose (mashup) new ways to use classical building design. Ask them to make beautiful harmonious modern work that references the classic designs you show them from the older buildings in your city. Memorable means that the design is original enough that it sticks in your head like a song you can't get rid of. Today, the most famous architects all work hard to provide a unique and memorable identity for every major project. Often their unexpected scale relationships or juxtapositioning of classical elements is used to produce the memorable and original design.

What if you give each student a choice of any public building function, such as post office, court building, prison, library, school, park pavilion, museum, police station, fire station, city hall, etc.? They might be aided by developing descriptive word lists for the building they are working on. Teams could compete on forming descriptive word lists for buildings.

Consider having them make a series preliminary idea solutions in pencil that steal from classical motifs, but they would be asked to combine or apply the classical motifs in unexpected ways that still feel right to them. Some kind of collage technique might also work. Team reviews of the preliminary ideas can help generate feedback from the preliminaries in the way an actual architectural firm would approach the challenge. Teams would include at least one member playing the role of the client, and another that plays the role of senior partner in the firm. The role of the team is to use the preliminary ideas to help them make design discoveries that can be exploited in the final proposals.

The preliminaries might be pencil, with final proposal presentation piece done in ink and watercolor. I would ask for the preliminaries to be turned in with the final product so that they can explain how they developed their idea.

Let us know what you decide to do. Share your experiences with the group.

Marvin (retired)
bartelart.com

On Mar 8, 2012, at 7:31 AM, sarah k wrote:

> My seventh grade students are currently studying Ancient Greece and
> Rome. I would like to complete an architecture lesson focused on the
> influence of the style on buildings in the U.S. I plan to take the
> students through a "photo tour" of our city then ask them to design a
> new building for the city that includes aspects of Greek and/or Roman
> architecture.
> Does anyone have suggestions for materials to complete this activity
> (watercolor, pen and ink, pencil) or suggestions for resources for me
> to check out before presenting the background information to the
> students? I have never taught architecture or Greek or Roman art, but
> both are a part of the curriculum at my new school.
> Feel free to email me off the list.
> Thank you!
>
> Sarah Kerns
> Quincy, MA
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Greek and Roman Architecture and Today
From: Peggy Woolsey <eoolspeg@nbnet.nb.ca>
Date: Thu, 8 Mar 2012 17:36:19 +0000
X-Message-Number: 5

Another factor to consider in designing structures is environmental
concerns. Having students research green roofs, water use, earth-
friendly materials, etc. adds a lot of thinking to architecture.
Again, so much is now available on line under green architecture. I
once had a printmaking class design tree houses to print. They learned
a lot about trees as well as structures.
Peggy

On 8-Mar-12, at 12:31 PM, sarah k wrote:

> My seventh grade students are currently studying Ancient Greece and
> Rome. I would like to complete an architecture lesson focused on the
> influence of the style on buildings in the U.S. I plan to take the
> students through a "photo tour" of our city then ask them to design a
> new building for the city that includes aspects of Greek and/or Roman
> architecture.
> Does anyone have suggestions for materials to complete this activity
> (watercolor, pen and ink, pencil) or suggestions for resources for me
> to check out before presenting the background information to the
> students? I have never taught architecture or Greek or Roman art, but
> both are a part of the curriculum at my new school.
> Feel free to email me off the list.
> Thank you!
>
> Sarah Kerns
> Quincy, MA
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Greek and Roman Architecture and Today
From: Christina Papageorgiou <papageorgiouchristina@gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 9 Mar 2012 09:49:30 +0200
X-Message-Number: 6

Dear Sara,
I am very happy to hear that ancient Greek art and architecture is
part of your school's curriculum for the students of the 7th year. I a
Greek architect and sculptor and I hope I will be of some assistance
to your quest.

Very briefly some of the things we learn in the architecture school
regarding the influence of ancient Greece to USA architects is
connected to the so called Greek Revival:

"The Greek Revival dominated American architecture during the period
1818-1850. It was the first truly national style in the United States,
found in all regions of the country. The popularity of the style was
due to strong associations with classical tradition and democracy. The
Greek Revival was very adaptable, and permeated all levels of
building, from high to low"
- Digital Archive of American Architecture
http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/cas/fnart/fa267/greekrev.html
- Wikipedia for Greek Revival
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_Revival_architecture
- Neoclassicism and America 1750 -1900
http://www.neoclassicism.us/Content/WhatIsNeoclassicism

One of the buildings that we are being taught is the Chancery
Building, U.S. Embassy in Athens. Made by W. Gropius is often
discussed as the modern - abstract equivalent of Parthenon, as from
the outside the building presents similarities and an abstract
repetition of the form. Following I copy/pasted something I found at
the site of the Embassy but I am sure that if you look further you
will find more detailed and better material.

"History The Embassy Building

The Embassy Building, completed July 4, 1961, was two and one-half
years in construction, at a cost of $1,500,000. All of the wooden
furniture was made in Greece, from American designs, by the Sarides
Company of Athens, which has made furniture for Embassies of many
nations throughout the world. All the fabrics used in the upholstered
furniture were created in the United States. Nearly 350 Greek
engineers, craftsmen and workmen were employed during the construction
of the building.

Priority was given to the use of local materials. All the marble,
cement, tile and plastering materials are Greek products. Most of the
fabricated materials came from Western Europe. The items imported form
the United States were mainly machinery, such as the air-conditioning,
heating and ventilating equipment, pumps and transformers.

The building was designed by Walter Gropius and “The Architects
Collaborative Inc.” of Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. It was
constructed by the “Albertis-Demopoulos Construction Co.” of Athens.

The Chancery is in the shape of a perfect square with a center court,
enclosing a planted area and fountain. Exterior and interior columns,
of Greek inspiration, are utilized to support giant horizontal
crossbeams. The building is constructed of steel and reinforced
concrete and is air-conditioned. Specially designed steel hangers are
attached to these beams which suspend (hang) the second and third
floors of the three-story building. A kind of cradle effect is thus
achieved, ensuring “give” in the event of a seismic tremor.

The marble of the building is as classic as its architectural style.
Most of it is the famous white marble from Mt. Penteli. Black marble
from Saint Peter, Peloponnesus, gray marble from Marathon and other
native Greek marbles are used throughout the building. The beautifully
turned wooded stair railing were made with Greek pearwood by Greek
artisans"

Kind regards
Christina Papageorgiou

On Thu, Mar 8, 2012 at 2:31 PM, sarah k <sarah.kerns3@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> My seventh grade students are currently studying Ancient Greece and
> Rome. I would like to complete an architecture lesson focused on the
> influence of the style on buildings in the U.S. I plan to take the
> students through a "photo tour" of our city then ask them to design a
> new building for the city that includes aspects of Greek and/or Roman
> architecture.
> Does anyone have suggestions for materials to complete this activity
> (watercolor, pen and ink, pencil) or suggestions for resources for me
> to check out before presenting the background information to the
> students? I have never taught architecture or Greek or Roman art, but
> both are a part of the curriculum at my new school.
> Feel free to email me off the list.
> Thank you!
>
> Sarah Kerns
> Quincy, MA
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html

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Please remember your environmental responsibility:
Before printing this document, ask yourself if you really need a hard copy
CHRISTINA PAPAGEORGIOU
SCULPTOR / ARCHITECT
ATHENS
GREECE
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