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Re: [teacherartexchange] Reflection and thanks:art shows

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twoducks_at_TeacherArtExchange
Date: Fri Mar 31 2006 - 05:47:14 PST


-----Original Message-----
From: staciemich@aol.com

 
<<. I'm now about to embark on planning an end-of-the year show. I'm
getting a group of students together to help me with it. It's going to
be a night of art, music and poetry. I'm tryign to think of the best
way to do it...how to hang the work, how to judge the work, where to
get ribbons or certificates and prizes. I was thinking of haning up
some work on clotheslines and having the kids decorate the clothes
pins. I'd also like to include "artist statements" with the work...>>

Staci: shows are great fun--the more the kids can do to create it the
more likely they are to bring their parents to see it. Artists plan
their shows! Elliot Eisner at NAEA stressed that all of our shows need
to be "contextual" ie., annotated by both teacher and students (artist
statements) for the "what's the point" piece. so do that. Parent
volunteer interviews with students is a real plus, as the kids can
probably speak better than they can write at this point. I am curious
as to why you think you need to judge the work? That really opens the
can of worms: what are the criteria? How many prizes? Who to judge?
What will this teach your students besides that most are not as good as
one? I realize that competition is part of the adult art world, but as
you have so often pointed out these children are just beginning to
actually make art. You need to consider very carefully where they are
as artists, what your role is (TEACHER) and what the show will teach
them. Everything that happens in school is a lesson whether we intend
it or not. Our students receive a ribbon and/or certificate as a
participant in the town arts council show and they are very pleased.
The knowledgeloom.org/tab website has a lengthy article with to-do
lists for creating a contextual art exhibit when you have large
populations and not much time. Check it out: it is under the Assessment
Practice. For my students the art show is a very cool final exam:
showing the community what we learned.
regards,
kathy douglas
in massachusetts

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