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Re: [teacherartexchange] cave art, camera obscura

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From: Dulcius (dulcius_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Sun Mar 05 2006 - 17:28:36 PST


Speaking of Paleolithic art, I recently finished a unit on it with my art
history hs classes; I rounded up some flat shells (pallets), soft ochre,
white, and reddish stones and charcoal (pigments), bamboo skewers (brushes),
and some old slate roof shingles (which I broke into smaller, less regular
shaped pieces). The students used some smooth, broken shell chunks as
"morters", and had SO MUCH fun grinding the pigments, mixing with binder (we
used water and elmer's glue, since authentic Paleo. binders were pretty
gross), and painting on the slate with broken or chewed on sticks! I teach
at an inner-city school, and my classes are often not choices for my
students, but I had 100% participation on this project, and so many of them
remember the info I shared with them on this topic. It was really fun!
-Lydia in Toledo
ps if you want to see some of the finished stone paintings, go to
http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?project=41378
----- Original Message -----
From: "ceastman" <ceastman@twmi.rr.com>
To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Sent: Sunday, March 05, 2006 8:13 PM
Subject: [teacherartexchange] cave art, camera obscura

>i was thinking about the upside down/right side up question... if this is
>truly how early man was first exposed to the 2 dimensional image, they may
>have first traced the images onto tent walls or the cave walls closest to
>the opening. then once they got the hang of drawing, they could move deeper
>into the caves, applying what they had learned to drawing without the
>camera. it would make sense that the drawings done on the stones where the
>proportions are not realistic could have been copied deep inside the
>lascaux cave. i think Gatton's idea is very plausible! fun to think about
>the start of art!
>
> linda in michigan
>
>
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