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[teacherartexchange] TAB

---------

From: Karen Carbutt (KCarbutt_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Fri Mar 03 2006 - 07:44:34 PST


This concept of choice in the classroom is so exciting to me. It's what I
know in my heart I should be doing but how do you keep it organized and
constant. Does it create more work for us and more clean-up? And how do
you organize it all into the art show? I love what Clyde Gaw is describing
but I need a jumping off place.
Karen in PA
----- Original Message -----
From: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest"
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
To: "teacherartexchange digest recipients"
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Sent: Friday, March 03, 2006 2:00 AM
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: March 01, 2006

> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Wednesday, March 01, 2006.
>
> 1. Re: teacherartexchange digest: February 28, 2006
> 2. Re: troubled 5th grade class
> 3. Re: troubled 5th grade class -CHOICE works
> 4. Home Stretch
> 5. Re: troubled 5th grade class -CHOICE works
> 6. Re: What's TAB Choice?
> 7. Tough Question-Curriculum? Know how to answer (TAB Choice Philosophy)
> 8. Re: troubled 5th grade class
> 9. Re: TAB Choice generates IDEAS
> 10. Movie about FRIDA that I can show in my classroom???????
> 11. Re: Movie about FRIDA that I can show in my classroom???????
> 12. Re:teacherartexchange digest: February 28, 2006
> 13. Re: Movie about FRIDA that I can show in my classroom???????
> 14. Re: troubled 5th grade class
> 15. Re: Movie about FRIDA that I can show in my classroom???????
> 16. Re: Movie about FRIDA that I can show in my classroom???????
> 17. Re: Movie about FRIDA that I can show in my classroom???????
> 18. Too all who want a KIDS' "Frida Kahlo" video
> 19. Re: Too all who want a KIDS' "Frida Kahlo" video
> 20. Chicago-bound?!
> 21. Re: Home Stretch
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: February 28, 2006
> From: subha de <desubhade@yahoo.co.in>
> Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2006 10:13:02 +0000 (GMT)
> X-Message-Number: 1
>
> I have been reading your mails everyday and also
> thinking a lot about how to weave these excellent
> ideas in the curriculum. Since the last one and half
> year that I have taken charge of the art program ,
> there has been changes in many areas . Art has become
> a compulsory subject till 8th grade and then they can
> opt for optional.The students have been extremely
> supportive and hard working. Now they also realise
> that it is not a GOOD FUN class but they will have to
> think and work.
> Now when it comes to choice they are simply opting out
> as they donot want a thinking course.
> The authority donot then ,want to continue with the
> senior art academic program and would have art as
> once a week activity. This also would mean, mean and
> lean budget allocation, less space more of other
> duties etc.
>
> This is a private residential school in India.Do you
> have such problems? How would you deal with this ?Is
> this a right forum to talk about this ?
> Subha De
>
> --- TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
> <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu> wrote:
>
> > TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Tuesday, February 28,
> > 2006.
> >
> > 1. Re: cool new twist on still life???
> > 2. Re: cool new twist on still life???
> > 3. An artist worth repeating - Julian Beever
> > (pavement painting, murals, painting)
> > 4. Teaching Strategies to Meet Multiple Needs
> > 5. still life twist
> > 6. Re: cool new twist on still life???
> > 7. Any suggestions on using different glazes or
> > slips for ceramics for grades 1-5. I usually use a
> > basi
> > 8. HS teenaged boys
> > 9. Re: HS teenaged boys
> > 10. books for kids
> > 11. Re: HS teenaged boys
> > 12. Re: HS teenaged boys
> > 13. What's TAB Choice?
> > 14. Looking for good books, websites or guides
> > 15. Re: What's TAB Choice?
> > 16. RE: books for kids
> > 17. Also looking for a glassfusing book, guide or
> > website
> > 18. Re: TAB Choice -Teaching for Artistic Behavior
> > 19. Oscar Martinez - inspirational art -"mysteries
> > of the mind"
> > 20. Re: What's TAB Choice?
> > 21. Pysanky eggs
> > 22. troubled 5th grade class
> > 23. Re: troubled 5th grade class
> > 24. RE: troubled 5th grade class
> > 25. RE: Pysanky eggs
> > 26. RE: Any suggestions on using different glazes or
> > slips for ceramics for grades 1-5. I usually use a
> > basi
> > 27. RE: Who needed images for NAEA Convention PP
> >
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >
> > Subject: Re: cool new twist on still life???
> > From: Maggie Tucker <arttucker@earthlink.net>
> > Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2006 05:06:35 -0600
> > X-Message-Number: 1
> >
> > I agree. Before my middle school students proceed
> > with still life ideas, we
> > look at Wayne Thiebauds, Paul Cezannes, David
> > Hockney's, Vincent Van
> > Gogh's, and some others. We list strategies the
> > artists use to be visually
> > expressive. I remind them that while photographic
> > realism was valued at
> > one stage of our history, it's now used as a
> > jumping-off point. Still life
> > strategies include:
> > transformation of an object, a la surrealism;
> > placing objects where they
> > don't belong; enlarging a portion of one object and
> > using it as background
> > for the rest; finding a pattern (basketweaving,
> > cloth) in the still life
> > and using it as "wallpaper", as well as the
> > expressive use of line, color,
> > and shape. Before mine started with their drawings,
> > they had to think of a
> > theme (which is different than their subject). So
> > one group thought "brute
> > force" and they are using sports equipment. It will
> > be interesting to see
> > if they use short, choppy strokes with their oil
> > pastels!
> >
> >
> > Maggie Tucker
> >
> > arttucker@earthlink.net
> >
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >
> > Subject: Re: cool new twist on still life???
> > From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
> > Date: Wed, 1 Mar 2006 06:41:47 -0500
> > X-Message-Number: 2
> >
> > Adding on to what Maggie wrote.....
> >
> > I have posted this before... Use your still life
> > arrangements - then
> > make the final composition Surreal - See Salvador
> > Dali's still life
> > and Rene Magritte. Have students find images to add
> > to their still
> > life that will make them "Surreal" - Sketch the
> > still life - find the
> > images and place them into the sketch. Then transfer
> > all to the good
> > paper - change scale of found objects - and still
> > life objects as
> > desired.
> >
> > I already told Wendy this idea... See work of
> > Clayton Pond. Tina
> > Grimes sent me a lesson that I will work on getting
> > on IAD. Make the
> > Still Life 3-D with corrugated cardboard cut-outs.
> >
> > Regards,
> >
> > Judy Decker
> > Incredible Art Department (IAD)
> >
> > On 3/1/06, Maggie Tucker wrote:
> > > transformation of an object, a la surrealism;
> > placing objects where they
> > > don't belong; enlarging a portion of one object
> > and using it as backgroun=
> > d
> > > for the rest; finding a pattern (basketweaving,
> > cloth) in the still life
> > > and using it as "wallpaper", as well as the
> > expressive use of line, color=
> > ,
> > > and shape.
> >
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >
> > Subject: An artist worth repeating - Julian Beever
> > (pavement painting, murals, painting)
> > From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
> > Date: Wed, 1 Mar 2006 07:53:35 -0500
> > X-Message-Number: 3
> >
> > Greetings Art Educators,
> >
> > Linda B. posted Julian Beever to Net Gold list. I
> > know we have looked
> > at his site before.... but now there are many new
> > members. Do take a
> > look.... See if you are inspired to do some sidewalk
> > "painting" in the
> > spring. This artist's pavement paintings have been
> > forwarded in
> > numerous emails.
> >
> > From Linda B:
> >
> > Julian Beever
> > http://users.skynet.be/J.Beever/
> >
> > Pavement drawings
> > Wall murals
> > Fine Art paintings
> >
> > Don't miss the pavement drawings. Marvelous!
> > -----------------------------
> > I have Julian's site linked on the Artists' page on
> > IAD.
> >
> > Regards,
> >
> > Judy Decker
> > Incredible Art Department
> > http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
> > Incredible Art Resources
> >
> http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/
> >
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >
> > Subject: Teaching Strategies to Meet Multiple Needs
> > From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
> > Date: Wed, 1 Mar 2006 08:03:54 -0500
> > X-Message-Number: 4
> >
> > Dear Art Educators,
> >
> > This article was shared in Riverdeep Newsletter
> > (posted here with permissio=
> > n).
> >
> > Teaching Strategies to Meet Multiple Needs:
> >
> http://www.inspiringteachers.com/articles/curriculum/multiple_needs.html
> > "Making the effort to meet your student's diverse
> > learning needs will
> > truly yield worthwhile results."
> >
> > Also see....
> > Tips to Meet Multiple Needs in the Classroom:
> >
> http://www.inspiringteachers.com/tips/curriculum/multiple_needs.html
> > "suggested tips and strategies to use to meet the
> > diverse needs of
> > your learners"
> >
> > While not specifically for the art classroom.... the
> > advice can be
> > applied. (Some of the links for resources on these
> > pages are broken...
> > but I think you can get the gist of it all.)
> >
> > Note: in a TAB Choice Classroom, "multiple needs"
> > are clearly met......
> >
> === message truncated ===
>
>
>
>
> __________________________________________________________
> Yahoo! India Matrimony: Find your partner now. Go to
http://yahoo.shaadi.com
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: troubled 5th grade class
> From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
> Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2006 07:33:35 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 2
>
> Hi Julie and All,
>
> My inclusion kids LOVED anything and everything 3-D.... I absolutely
> adored my inclusion kids. Often, the severe behavior kids would earn
> the privilege of coming to art class. It was a joy to have them.
>
> Take a look at Lotte Petricone's Head dresses lesson....
> http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/Lotte-Headdress.htm
>
> If I were you, I would work out a sample... see what works for you
> (either start with a cardboard template - or the newspaper hat
> approach). Once you have your hat made.. WEAR it in this class... When
> they ask about it (and yes they will laugh at first).... tell them
> what all it means to YOU... You will talk all about AFRICAN cultures
> and their adornment.
>
> If they don't seem interested, you will know not to try the lesson
> with them. If they are interested... Say... "Well.... this will be our
> next lesson... but I need everyone to participate and behave as this
> lesson is very special to me." You will then display your hat on a wig
> form as a constant reminder that they will do that next if they
> continue to behave. I used 3-D to hook all of my "mischievous" kids.
> Peer pressure helped to (elementary kids didn't do a lot of 3-D in my
> district - so ALL kids "thirsted" for it).
>
> Of course, if all they do is laugh... then you need to talk about how
> it is disrespectful to laugh at a culture when you do not understand
> them.... so the lesson will not be lost. It is a win-win. If you
> decide not to do the lesson, at least YOU had a lot of fun making your
> own personal hat. You could include all sorts of collage elements if
> you wish. Lotte just used construction paper, newspaper - scissors
> and glue.
>
> I OFTEN tested the interest in the 3-D project by showing what I made
first=
> .
> One sample was a bust with one group of students one year... but that
> same sample was a HUGE hit a different year when I turned it into a
> dance helmet. It was a large tiger head. I wish now I had saved it....
> just so I could show you. I could only bring so much home when I
> retired. My husband actually wrote the story to go along with my dance
> helmet. My students loved it!!! I acted out/danced the story as I read
> it to them... They all had to write a story and create a dance.
>
> Judy Decker
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: troubled 5th grade class -CHOICE works
> From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
> Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2006 07:46:29 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 3
>
> Hi Julie,
>
> I forgot to add this.....
>
> TAB Choice is WORKING for many teachers with difficult students. One
> student who has trouble with all other classes now gets to come to art
> twice (for one choice teacher). Other teachers have seen complete
> about face - disruptive students now love coming to art. You don't
> hear of discipline problems on the TAB Choice list. Something must be
> working.
>
> I understand that switching to choice is a HUGE step to take. You have
> to re-think your teaching... how you do things....your philosophy.
>
> Research shows that students perform better and behave better when
> given choice/ownership.
>
> You could try some "baby steps" ... start introducing some choices and
> see it that works for you and these students.
>
> Check in the list archives for TAB Choice:
> http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/TAB-CHOICE.htm
>
> EVERY kid should LOVE art at that age level... they don't all have to
> be talented in art... but they should love coming to art.
>
> Regards,
>
> Judy Decker
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Home Stretch
> From: staciemich@aol.com
> Date: Thu, 02 Mar 2006 08:08:17 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 4
>
> Hey guys,
> I'm happy to report that there are only two days left to this third
> nine weeks, and somehow I survived. It wasn't easy at all, and I never
> did get a handle on these kids...unfortunately. If I look for
> something positive in it, I can say that the experience has forced me
> to learn how to let some things go, and they did enjoy their final
> project. I had them create Frida Kahlo-inspired self-portraits, which
> they glued to the back of a cardboard frame. The frames were a pain
> for me to cut and assemble, but the kids enjoyed painting them, and I
> have to say that some came out really nicely. This group was so
> unmotivated that I never even had any quality work to hang up...until
> now, when it's too late.
>
> Anyway, I have this weekend to think about how to structure my last
> nine weeks. I have to believe that this next group of middle school
> will be better. They cannot be any worse! I'm thinking that I'm not
> going to even attempt teaching value or shading techniques. I'm also
> thinking that I might need to structure it more as a lecture based
> class. I know that it won't be as fun for them, but I just don't think
> that these kids can handle the freedom. Perhaps if my class is
> structured more like their other academic classes, with notetaking and
> frequent quizzes, they will treat it more like a real class? I was
> all about letting them jump in there and create projects, but it really
> didn't work well. The kids were absolutely wild. I need to tame them.
> I'd like to start off the class by talking about art and why it's
> important, etc...Perhaps I need to come up with a good powerpoint with
> pictures and examples...maybe starting from Cave art and moving through
> today...emphasizing that art is communication, a part of history. I
> don't know.
>
> I will have nine weeks to pack as much in as possible. The last
> assignment for the group I have now is a reflection on the class. I'm
> asking them about their favorite and least favorite projects, how the
> class could be better, and how they felt about the class in general.
> I've received a few papers already. Many enjoyed the last project.
> They all hated the Bearden-inspired collage project (go figure). Some
> liked the surreal project because they could kind of draw anything they
> liked. The only complaints I've received have mostly been about the
> behavior of the kids and how I need to find a better way to discipline
> because it was hard to learn with the class being so disruptive.
>
> I really want to end this year on a better note. I'm forcing myself to
> stay positive and have a good attitude about it. I really want to feel
> like I got something right by the end of the year. I'm trying not to
> get frustrated with myself for not "getting it" already. I figure that
> it will just take time.
>
> So, things I definitely want to keep in the next nine weeks: Picasso,
> surrealism, Frida Kahlo, the edible color wheel...and I really can't
> say that any of the other projects were overly successful. I haven't
> been able to get my students to create a good collage yet, and the
> still life drawing was a disaster. I'm thinking that I need some kind
> of theme to connect everything...communication? I just got a good
> video on Chuck Close and one of Keith Haring that I want to watch. I'd
> still like to include Bearden, but the kids really didn't enjoy the
> collage project...so I need a new angle.
>
> Any ideas? Thanks guys :)
>
> Stacie
>
> Stacie D.
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: troubled 5th grade class -CHOICE works
> From: "Rebecca Burch" <mamallama@gmail.com>
> Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2006 08:20:19 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 5
>
> Ah... THAT'S the info I needed, too!
> Gratzi. :)
>
> Becky
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: What's TAB Choice?
> From: Sheri Fried <sfried68@yahoo.com>
> Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2006 05:45:20 -0800 (PST)
> X-Message-Number: 6
>
> Kathy and Judy--
> Thank you very much for your quick and thorough
> response to my inquiry about TAB Choice Art education.
> I plan to explore this method much more. I often
> sense a desire within my elem. students to branch off
> and explore materials and ideas on their own, after my
> unit introductions are given. It does seem a bit
> "cookie cutter" and stifling that I have them all do
> the same projects!
> I'm sure there's info about this question, but what
> about the unmotivated kids or those who want to work,
> but can't think of ideas for themselves?
> Again-
> thanks for all the great links.
> Sheri
>
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
> http://mail.yahoo.com
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Tough Question-Curriculum? Know how to answer (TAB Choice
Philosophy)
> From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
> Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2006 08:46:47 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 7
>
> Dear Art Educators,
>
> How might a Tab Choice Teacher answer the questions on Curriculum?
> The other day, a Getty member posted a question she received about
> "curriculum" - I brought it to ALL lists... It is so important to know
> exactly what "curriculum" means. Patty K. shared some good points on
> Art Education list (which I sent to Jeanette).
>
> Here is a very thorough answer from Clyde Gaw (posted here with
permission)
>
> Curriculum as we know it are the activities one employs for
> whatever it is you expect your students to learn. For the choice based art
> teacher, learning to think like an artist is our goal here and there are
tw=
> o
> curriculums going on simultaneously. One is the teacher centered
curriculum=
> , one
> in which a series of lessons or activities that tie into state standards
or
> essential learning. The other is the student-centered curriculum, which
can=
> be
> negotiated between student and teacher or facilitated by the teacher for
th=
> e
> student. In between these two curricula is a third unwritten curriculum,
th=
> e one
> in which experimentation is afforded, risks are taken, discoveries are
made=
> and
> new-found knowledge segues into deep, profound personally meaningful
learni=
> ng
> experiences.
>
> When curriculum activities are centrally prescribed, planned
sequent=
> ially
> and outcomes already determined, surprise and discovery are marginalized.
T=
> he
> main thing that attracted me to choice was the amount of diversity within
t=
> his
> three-pronged approach to curriculum. There is a dynamic within the art
> curriculum now that I never had before. The kids know it, I know it and
eve=
> ryone
> else knows it. This is why the art room experience today is more important
=
> to
> the kids than it ever was before.
>
> Then Clyde came back later with more:
>
> ....here is another response:
>
> I think the applicants would do themselves well, if they could
> describe how "curriculum" would look, as it might be employed inside
> of an actual class. So let's take the "painting curriculum" for
> example as it might apply to a choice art program. Again, I am
> expecting to have three forms of curriculum going on simultaneously
> for this subject area and I am describing what goes on in the choice
> art room for this interviewer. (Actually, today, there are usually
> committees doing the interviewing so let's imagine I am in the "hot
> seat" and I am speaking to a group of distinguished parents and
> educators) "After describing to the group the way curriculum might
> work in a choice art room, I would give them a description of a
> class with a lesson from the painting curriculum and would describe
> my room, complete with all of my "art centers." Then begin my
> narrative;
>
> "After students enter the art room, I invite them to the
> demonstration table for the daily lesson. I have 29 2nd graders. I
> know their attention span is only about a minute or two, so I have
> to be good and fast with this demo. I have a copy of the "Starry
> Night" in front of me at my table. "Boys and girls, this is
> the 'Starry Night' by Vincent Van Gogh! Notice how Van Gogh was
> inspired to paint the night sky! With swirls of color and
> movement! `Why the sky looks ALIVE!' Look at the combination of
> lines colors and brush strokes! Today, one of your choices is to
> paint your version of a landscape like the Starry Night! Let's look
> at the way Van Gogh divides his painting into parts and creates one
> of the worlds most famous paintings!" Now I get my paper and paint
> out and show them how to dip two colors of liquid tempera paint onto
> the end of one brush using blue and red. I begin to draw the horizon
> line, and work in the background, middle ground and
> foreground. "What is happening here?" "What happened to my two
> colors?" The children all tell me it turned purple inside the
> painted lines. "What would happen if I use other combinations of
> color?" At this time the kids are ready to bust out=85.They are primed
> and ready to go. In previous lessons they have learned how to
> acquire materials from the paint center and several students who are
> ready to work in this medium are suiting up into their smocks. I ask
> the students, "Ok. Are you ready to go to work on your art now?"
> They answer with a resounding "yes!"
>
> Ten boys, who had already formulated plans earlier, go directly to
> the cardboard construction center. They begin constructing space
> ships, aircraft and other "inventions" with pre-cut cardboard, glue
> and tape. Eight girls and four boys go to the paint center and begin
> acquiring painting materials. Of the painters, five paint their
> versions of "Van Gogh" landscapes. The other nine explore the
> sensory qualities of the paint and experiment with the brush
> technique I demonstrated earlier working in abstract compositions.
> Four girls, who have been working with stick puppets from earlier
> classes, go to the cardboard construction center, gather paper,
> cardboard, yarn and textile materials and begin creating puppet
> characters and formulate a play about a little girl, her friends and
> a lost puppy. At the same time, two other boys begin working from
> the block center and construct a "city." After the students have
> gotten into "flow," I get out my digital camera, and begin to take
> pictures of them "in action" because some of the artworks are
> transitory, and will be de-constructed from the next class. Later,
> after the work has been created, two two-minute puppet plays
> performed, clean up and art work put into storage or prepared to be
> taken home, the end of class is almost at hand and we look at the
> digital pictures we have taken on my teacher computer screen (It
> would be great if it was hooked up to a larger monitor.) This is a
> time for self-reflection, discussion and feedback. Many of the
> students eagerly share their discoveries and stories about their
> experiences in today's art class.
>
> Here is what happened within the curricula. Not everyone was
> interested in painting Van Gogh landscapes. That is ok. They weren't
> buying what I was selling and I accept that. They were still apart
> of the experience and listened to my introduction of Van Gogh and my
> analysis of landscape composition. Those who chose not to paint "van
> goghs" had formulated their own plans just like real artists do. As
> you know, artists work from MEMORY, IMAGINATION, OBSERVATION,
> EXPLORATION and FEELINGS and EMOTION. This is the core of the
> student-centered curriculum. When we weave the two curriculums
> together the dynamic third part of the whole curricula shifts into
> gear.
>
> The puppeteers did a play near the end of class and the cardboard
> spaceship inventors who were inspired by them, went to the puppet
> stage afterward and turned their sculptures into spaceship puppets
> and reenacted a scene from "Star Wars." The painters, who started
> to experiment with paint and color, took cardboard from the
> construction center and began to draw into their paintings with
> cardboard sticks. Then they began to pull mono-prints off of their
> paintings. So the third curriculum kicks in and this is important
> because discovery learning happening here and is the most potent
> form of learning known to cognitive scientists. It is conceiving of
> ones own learning from one's own mind and going beyond the given
> information and this is how real artists operate and imaginative
> thinking capabilities cultivated.
>
> I was talking to a friend of mine who is an engineer, and he
> said, "All engineers prefer to work with STATIC elements because you
> can control them. They don't want to work with DYNAMIC elements,
> because you can't control them." Well, I thought, that's great, but
> if you are an educator, you want to exploit the dynamic because we
> are working with dynamic individuals all the time. So the curriculum
> should be flexible to account for individual differences, because we
> are all different, with different structures of mind.
>
> ...this has gotten longer than I had planned, but it
> would be good for a prospective art teacher to describe how one goes
> about implementing curriculum during an interview so the word
> curriculum does not become an undefined, abstract word.
> -------------------------------
> Clyde - if you see this on Art Education list... know that you have
> helped at least one teacher out there.... and probably many more.
> Never apologize for the long answers (grin).
>
> Judy Decker
> Incredible Art Department
> http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
> Incredible Art Resources
> http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: troubled 5th grade class
> From: Sheri Fried <sfried68@yahoo.com>
> Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2006 05:53:08 -0800 (PST)
> X-Message-Number: 8
>
> I also had a tough 5th grade class last year. They
> complained with every project, immediately gave up,
> then acted up. I decided to choose only projects that
> produced immediate positive results. I even began
> using my 2nd and 3rd grade projects with them. My
> units for 5th grade usually last 5-6 weeks, meeting
> once per week. With this class, their attention
> barely lasted 1-2 classes. So, I shortened my
> projects so they would get quicker satisfaction and
> less frustration and monotony.
> I did feel that my curriculum goals for that class
> were not being met. However, the students began to
> feel successful and confident,a nd their behavior
> changed, for the most part!
> Good luck, Sheri
>
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
> http://mail.yahoo.com
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: TAB Choice generates IDEAS
> From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
> Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2006 09:29:32 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 9
>
> Hi Sheri and all,
>
> > but what about the unmotivated kids or those who want to work,
> > but can't think of ideas for themselves?
>
> This is where you merge TAB Choice with DBAE.... but just know that
> they won't all be doing the same artist or style... Kids develop their
> own style and use their own inspirations. You can still provide them
> with images to inspire. I was always inspired by an image I saw... all
> of my best work began with an image somewhere. I will be honest with
> you... I was an "idea factory" with my kids (I helped them brainstorm)
> .... I tossed out ideas all the time - with a wink - hoping that those
> who were stumped would latch on to some/one of them and take
> ownership. Be aware that some of their ideas may not please you....
> you can try to get them to stretch their ideas.... but never call
> their ideas "pond scum" (grin - have chuckle if you see this Larry S).
>
> Here is a page about generating IDEAS:
> http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/Files/ideas.htm
>
> Check out some of the resources listed too - especially those posted
> by Marvin Bartel. He sees what is good in Choice - knows what is good
> in DBAE - and can merge the best of both. Marvin is opposed to the
> image flooding so many of us DBAE-ers do.... He feels the art making
> should come first - then the historical connections after - showing
> comparisons between what the kids have done and what the masters have
> done.
>
> You also wrote:
>
> >>>I did feel that my curriculum goals for that class were not being met.
>
> I feel that the real goals were being met - the most important goals
(smile=
> ).
> If this is what you feel/felt - then the curriculum needs to be
> examined more closely.
>
> Thanks Sheri for bringing this discussion to Getty list.
>
> Judy Decker
>
> On 3/2/06, Sheri Fried wrote:
> > but what
> > about the unmotivated kids or those who want to work,
> > but can't think of ideas for themselves?
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Movie about FRIDA that I can show in my classroom???????
> From: "leah rachlis" <leah@pcisys.net>
> Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2006 08:11:23 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 10
>
> Hi All,
>
> Does anyone know of a movie about FRIDA, that I can actually show to 4th
> graders?
>
> I brought yet another movie home from the library last night, and there is
> NO way, I can show it to my kids, but they are having a great time with my
> famous artist unit.
>
> Any suggestions, my only plan now is to copy the video and cut out all the
> "adult" themes, which would leave very little to show.
>
> -Leah in Colorado
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Movie about FRIDA that I can show in my classroom???????
> From: "Rebecca Burch" <mamallama@gmail.com>
> Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2006 10:25:19 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 11
>
> I actually use that movie -- I just edited a few segments onto a
> different videotape. It's kind of disjointed, but it actually worked
> pretty well. :) (I told the kids I had to edit it down for time --
> they don't have to know there are dirty parts.)
>
>
> Becky
> Charleston WV
>
>
> On 3/2/06, leah rachlis <leah@pcisys.net> wrote:
> > Hi All,
> >
> > Does anyone know of a movie about FRIDA, that I can actually show to 4th
> > graders?
> >
> > I brought yet another movie home from the library last night, and there
i=
> s
> > NO way, I can show it to my kids, but they are having a great time with
m=
> y
> > famous artist unit.
> >
> > Any suggestions, my only plan now is to copy the video and cut out all
th=
> e
> > "adult" themes, which would leave very little to show.
> >
> > -Leah in Colorado
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re:teacherartexchange digest: February 28, 2006
> From: "BHARAT KUMAR SHARMA" <bksharma_artist_in@hotmail.com>
> Date: Thu, 02 Mar 2006 21:38:52 +0530
> X-Message-Number: 12
>
> dear sobha,
> i was just going through my mail and some where your mail i found in
teacher
> art exchange, how nice to say that i am working as art teacher in navodaya
> vidyalaya since 1989
> the problem we face as art teacher i am now convinced that other art
teacher
> also face the same problem, there is only one way i found help yourself to
> create your own environment in the school you have work hard with your
> children without thinking for reward from your administrator
> i was in santiniketan and specilized with m fine painting, we can exchange
> thoughts afterall
> we are in the same boat ,
> none otherthan a artist can understand the pain we are keeping inside
> what do you feel is it not true ?
> take care and reply
> sincerely
> bksharma
>
>
> >From: subha de <desubhade@yahoo.co.in>
> >Reply-To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
> ><teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> >To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
> ><teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> >Subject: Re:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: February 28,
> >2006
> >Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2006 10:13:02 +0000 (GMT)
> >
> > I have been reading your mails everyday and also
> >thinking a lot about how to weave these excellent
> >ideas in the curriculum. Since the last one and half
> >year that I have taken charge of the art program ,
> >there has been changes in many areas . Art has become
> >a compulsory subject till 8th grade and then they can
> >opt for optional.The students have been extremely
> >supportive and hard working. Now they also realise
> >that it is not a GOOD FUN class but they will have to
> >think and work.
> >Now when it comes to choice they are simply opting out
> >as they donot want a thinking course.
> >The authority donot then ,want to continue with the
> >senior art academic program and would have art as
> >once a week activity. This also would mean, mean and
> >lean budget allocation, less space more of other
> >duties etc.
> >
> >This is a private residential school in India.Do you
> >have such problems? How would you deal with this ?Is
> >this a right forum to talk about this ?
> >Subha De
> >
> >--- TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
> ><teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu> wrote:
> >
> > > TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Tuesday, February 28,
> > > 2006.
> > >
> > > 1. Re: cool new twist on still life???
> > > 2. Re: cool new twist on still life???
> > > 3. An artist worth repeating - Julian Beever
> > > (pavement painting, murals, painting)
> > > 4. Teaching Strategies to Meet Multiple Needs
> > > 5. still life twist
> > > 6. Re: cool new twist on still life???
> > > 7. Any suggestions on using different glazes or
> > > slips for ceramics for grades 1-5. I usually use a
> > > basi
> > > 8. HS teenaged boys
> > > 9. Re: HS teenaged boys
> > > 10. books for kids
> > > 11. Re: HS teenaged boys
> > > 12. Re: HS teenaged boys
> > > 13. What's TAB Choice?
> > > 14. Looking for good books, websites or guides
> > > 15. Re: What's TAB Choice?
> > > 16. RE: books for kids
> > > 17. Also looking for a glassfusing book, guide or
> > > website
> > > 18. Re: TAB Choice -Teaching for Artistic Behavior
> > > 19. Oscar Martinez - inspirational art -"mysteries
> > > of the mind"
> > > 20. Re: What's TAB Choice?
> > > 21. Pysanky eggs
> > > 22. troubled 5th grade class
> > > 23. Re: troubled 5th grade class
> > > 24. RE: troubled 5th grade class
> > > 25. RE: Pysanky eggs
> > > 26. RE: Any suggestions on using different glazes or
> > > slips for ceramics for grades 1-5. I usually use a
> > > basi
> > > 27. RE: Who needed images for NAEA Convention PP
> > >
> > >
> >----------------------------------------------------------------------
> > >
> > > Subject: Re: cool new twist on still life???
> > > From: Maggie Tucker <arttucker@earthlink.net>
> > > Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2006 05:06:35 -0600
> > > X-Message-Number: 1
> > >
> > > I agree. Before my middle school students proceed
> > > with still life ideas, we
> > > look at Wayne Thiebauds, Paul Cezannes, David
> > > Hockney's, Vincent Van
> > > Gogh's, and some others. We list strategies the
> > > artists use to be visually
> > > expressive. I remind them that while photographic
> > > realism was valued at
> > > one stage of our history, it's now used as a
> > > jumping-off point. Still life
> > > strategies include:
> > > transformation of an object, a la surrealism;
> > > placing objects where they
> > > don't belong; enlarging a portion of one object and
> > > using it as background
> > > for the rest; finding a pattern (basketweaving,
> > > cloth) in the still life
> > > and using it as "wallpaper", as well as the
> > > expressive use of line, color,
> > > and shape. Before mine started with their drawings,
> > > they had to think of a
> > > theme (which is different than their subject). So
> > > one group thought "brute
> > > force" and they are using sports equipment. It will
> > > be interesting to see
> > > if they use short, choppy strokes with their oil
> > > pastels!
> > >
> > >
> > > Maggie Tucker
> > >
> > > arttucker@earthlink.net
> > >
> > >
> >----------------------------------------------------------------------
> > >
> > > Subject: Re: cool new twist on still life???
> > > From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
> > > Date: Wed, 1 Mar 2006 06:41:47 -0500
> > > X-Message-Number: 2
> > >
> > > Adding on to what Maggie wrote.....
> > >
> > > I have posted this before... Use your still life
> > > arrangements - then
> > > make the final composition Surreal - See Salvador
> > > Dali's still life
> > > and Rene Magritte. Have students find images to add
> > > to their still
> > > life that will make them "Surreal" - Sketch the
> > > still life - find the
> > > images and place them into the sketch. Then transfer
> > > all to the good
> > > paper - change scale of found objects - and still
> > > life objects as
> > > desired.
> > >
> > > I already told Wendy this idea... See work of
> > > Clayton Pond. Tina
> > > Grimes sent me a lesson that I will work on getting
> > > on IAD. Make the
> > > Still Life 3-D with corrugated cardboard cut-outs.
> > >
> > > Regards,
> > >
> > > Judy Decker
> > > Incredible Art Department (IAD)
> > >
> > > On 3/1/06, Maggie Tucker wrote:
> > > > transformation of an object, a la surrealism;
> > > placing objects where they
> > > > don't belong; enlarging a portion of one object
> > > and using it as backgroun=
> > > d
> > > > for the rest; finding a pattern (basketweaving,
> > > cloth) in the still life
> > > > and using it as "wallpaper", as well as the
> > > expressive use of line, color=
> > > ,
> > > > and shape.
> > >
> > >
> >----------------------------------------------------------------------
> > >
> > > Subject: An artist worth repeating - Julian Beever
> > > (pavement painting, murals, painting)
> > > From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
> > > Date: Wed, 1 Mar 2006 07:53:35 -0500
> > > X-Message-Number: 3
> > >
> > > Greetings Art Educators,
> > >
> > > Linda B. posted Julian Beever to Net Gold list. I
> > > know we have looked
> > > at his site before.... but now there are many new
> > > members. Do take a
> > > look.... See if you are inspired to do some sidewalk
> > > "painting" in the
> > > spring. This artist's pavement paintings have been
> > > forwarded in
> > > numerous emails.
> > >
> > > From Linda B:
> > >
> > > Julian Beever
> > > http://users.skynet.be/J.Beever/
> > >
> > > Pavement drawings
> > > Wall murals
> > > Fine Art paintings
> > >
> > > Don't miss the pavement drawings. Marvelous!
> > > -----------------------------
> > > I have Julian's site linked on the Artists' page on
> > > IAD.
> > >
> > > Regards,
> > >
> > > Judy Decker
> > > Incredible Art Department
> > > http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
> > > Incredible Art Resources
> > >
> >http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/
> > >
> > >
> >----------------------------------------------------------------------
> > >
> > > Subject: Teaching Strategies to Meet Multiple Needs
> > > From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
> > > Date: Wed, 1 Mar 2006 08:03:54 -0500
> > > X-Message-Number: 4
> > >
> > > Dear Art Educators,
> > >
> > > This article was shared in Riverdeep Newsletter
> > > (posted here with permissio=
> > > n).
> > >
> > > Teaching Strategies to Meet Multiple Needs:
> > >
> >http://www.inspiringteachers.com/articles/curriculum/multiple_needs.html
> > > "Making the effort to meet your student's diverse
> > > learning needs will
> > > truly yield worthwhile results."
> > >
> > > Also see....
> > > Tips to Meet Multiple Needs in the Classroom:
> > >
> >http://www.inspiringteachers.com/tips/curriculum/multiple_needs.html
> > > "suggested tips and strategies to use to meet the
> > > diverse needs of
> > > your learners"
> > >
> > > While not specifically for the art classroom.... the
> > > advice can be
> > > applied. (Some of the links for resources on these
> > > pages are broken...
> > > but I think you can get the gist of it all.)
> > >
> > > Note: in a TAB Choice Classroom, "multiple needs"
> > > are clearly met......
> > >
> >=== message truncated ===
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >__________________________________________________________
> >Yahoo! India Matrimony: Find your partner now. Go to
> >http://yahoo.shaadi.com
> >
> >---
> >To unsubscribe go to
> >http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Movie about FRIDA that I can show in my classroom???????
> From: Sheri Fried <sfried68@yahoo.com>
> Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2006 09:16:00 -0800 (PST)
> X-Message-Number: 13
>
> I don't know of a video about Frida Kahlo, but I do
> know of a website with an interactive game about her.
> Visit www.albrightknox.org Click on Education,
> then on Artgames. Visit the Games Gallery and click
> on her painting. My students love all the games on
> this site!
> Have fun, Sheri
>
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
> http://mail.yahoo.com
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: troubled 5th grade class
> From: Maggie White <mwhiteaz@cybertrails.com>
> Date: Thu, 02 Mar 2006 13:20:55 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 14
>
> I was about to reply when I read Sheri's message; I agree that you
> probably need to shorten your assignments so they can feel successful
> really quickly. Also, find out what you can about your predecessor,
> from both staff and students. Was s/he a perfectionist who expected too
> much? Or who gave them pre-digested lessons that required little effort
> or thought (you know, the kind where everything's precut/colored and all
> they do is paste it or color it or something), and now you're asking
> them to do both? Ask some of your more thoughtful students if there was
> something about last year's art class they didn't like. They may have
> had such a bad experience that art now leaves a bad taste in their
mouths.
>
> Having grown up in the South, I know that Yankees are still looked upon
> with suspicion, especially in the smaller towns. If you're talking
> loud and fast in a funny accent you might as well be from another
> planet. A college friend (one of those steel magnolias) who worked in
> movie production had some pretty funny stories about her stereotypical
> Noo Yawk boss when they were filming in the South; she pretty much had
> to follow after him and smoothe all the feathers of the locals that he
> ruffled. Having taught for many years on a reservation, I learned that
> as an outsider, I had to dampen my enthusiasm a bit, back off somewhat,
> and let them come around to me. If you can handle it, ask your mentor
> or other local if you come across too strong.
>
> Maggie
>
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Movie about FRIDA that I can show in my classroom???????
> From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
> Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2006 16:22:18 -0600
> X-Message-Number: 15
>
> I agree! I found "Frida" to be one of the best videos I have watched in
> terms of explaining the thought processes behind the artworks. I also
> remember watching it and being annoyed that a movie as thought provoking
as
> this one cannot be shown in a classroom because of the adult themes. While
I
> understand that the purpose of this video was for entertainment purposes,
if
> the producers had focused on the long-term educational value I would have
> been thrilled. Too bad they didn't ask me!!! :-)
> ~Michal
> K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
> http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
>
> > Does anyone know of a movie about FRIDA, that I can actually show to 4th
> > graders?
> >
> > Any suggestions, my only plan now is to copy the video and cut out all
the
> > "adult" themes, which would leave very little to show.
> >
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Movie about FRIDA that I can show in my classroom???????
> From: "Rebecca Burch" <mamallama@gmail.com>
> Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2006 20:31:02 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 16
>
> You can edit those scenes out, though. The movie still works without
them.
>
> Becky
>
>
>
> On 3/2/06, M. Austin <whest177@wheatstate.com> wrote:
> > I agree! I found "Frida" to be one of the best videos I have watched in
> > terms of explaining the thought processes behind the artworks. I also
> > remember watching it and being annoyed that a movie as thought provoking
=
> as
> > this one cannot be shown in a classroom because of the adult themes.
Whil=
> e I
> > understand that the purpose of this video was for entertainment
purposes,=
> if
> > the producers had focused on the long-term educational value I would
have
> > been thrilled. Too bad they didn't ask me!!! :-)
> > ~Michal
> > K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
> > http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
> >
> > > Does anyone know of a movie about FRIDA, that I can actually show to
4t=
> h
> > > graders?
> > >
> > > Any suggestions, my only plan now is to copy the video and cut out all
=
> the
> > > "adult" themes, which would leave very little to show.
> > >
> >
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Movie about FRIDA that I can show in my classroom???????
> From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
> Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2006 20:02:51 -0600
> X-Message-Number: 17
>
> Not in my district - if it were known that I showed an "R" movie, even
> edited, I'd be called out on it. I might "win" in front of the board, but
> then I'd have to clear every video through them. I teach in a district
that
> pulled "Berenstain Bears First Date" in the primary building cause those
> darn bears KISSED! :-)
> ~Michal
> K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
> http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
>
>
>
> > You can edit those scenes out, though. The movie still works without
> > them.
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Too all who want a KIDS' "Frida Kahlo" video
> From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
> Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2006 22:26:25 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 18
>
> Greetings,
>
> I agree, much of Frida's work is too mature of a theme for the younger
> kids. Even a video that is promoted for students (an eleven minute
> video) has material that is not appropriate.
>
> Why don't all of you who are interested, write a nice short letter to
> Chrystal Productions? I think YOU were instrumental in getting an Andy
> Warhol "Dropping In" video done. There weren't any good KID videos for
> him either.
>
> Chrystal Productions will listen to you.... It will take time - but it
> may happen. I think it was February 2003 when I first suggested an
> Andy video.
>
> I'm with Michal on this one.... re-taping an R rated movie does not
> send a good message.....Remember, that video is copyrighted (smile).
>
> I don't recommend the 11 minute one either as it is mainly stills (not
> much more interesting than a slide show). You can make a more
> effective PowerPoint.
>
> Regards,
>
> Judy Decker
> Incredible Art Department
> http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
> Incredible Art Resources
> http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Too all who want a KIDS' "Frida Kahlo" video
> From: woodyduncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
> Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2006 20:58:43 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 19
>
>
> On Mar 2, 2006, at 8:26 PM, Judy Decker wrote:
> > I agree, much of Frida's work is too mature of a theme for the younger
> > kids. Even a video that is promoted for students (an eleven minute
> > video) has material that is not appropriate.
>
> I agree with Michal that it is a great movie, one of my favorites.
> Not proper for most of my Middle School students. Yet when it
> first came out there was a 15 minute preview of the movie on TV.
> I used the preview in my classroom with no problems. Of course
> I was in a different part of Kansas (urban area). We did a
> vocabulary lesson around Frida. It was a silhouette of Frida's head
> filled with vocabulary terms we learned. It was a good lesson even
> if Bi-Sexual showed up in several posters. I still displayed them.
> Good or bad, I seldom had any complaints or input from parents.
> I suggested that students consult their parents if they wished to
> see the movie. Years before, I remember taking our two boys to
> Cabaret when it first came out. It was rated R as well, but very
> educational.
> Woody
>
> Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
> 35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
> in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
> http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
> Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
> Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703
>
> =93The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
> is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
> of your artwork that soars.=94 from: =93Art & Fear=94
>
> Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
> http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
> Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
> http://www.taospaint.com/DancePics/Triplets.html
> My newest watercolors:
> http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Recent.html
>
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Chicago-bound?!
> From: "Amy Broady" <AmyBroady@alumni.duke.edu>
> Date: Fri, 3 Mar 2006 00:13:08 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 20
>
> Well, it is about to happen for me, I think!!!
>
> After weeks of pondering, wondering, doubt, indecision and uncertainty, it
> looks like I will be spending the later part of my spring break up in
> Chicago!
>
> I didn't think I'd be able to--housing being a huge problem. I had no one
to
> room with, and I was not enthused about staying off-site and having to
> navigate (and pay for!) transportation to and from the Hilton.
>
> Well, about 2 weeks ago I attended a county-wide art teacher inserice
> meeting, and found out that one of the teachers had an extra space in her
> room.
>
> Of course, less then 24 hours later, I was on a flight out of town for a
> week, and was unable to follow up with plans. Upon my return the beginning
> of this week, I was swamped with getting back into routine while battling
a
> cold that has become a sinus infection. (Lucky me--not!)
>
> But yesterday I made time to research flight options and today I lined up
my
> childcare with my DMIL. I need to confirm with that teacher that she still
> has room for a 4th. And hope that my preferred flight times and rate are
> still available.
>
> Wish me luck! I am hoping and praying it will all work out. This will be
my
> first time at the NAEA Conference. I am so excited!!! And of course I
would
> want to meet you all, those who are going, at the breakfast. :-)
>
> It has been a rough few weeks, getting the sub plans and room ready for
> someone else to take over for a week, getting my grades in for report
cards,
> packing myself and my kids for a week out of town, coming back to work
> feeling yucky (this is at least the 3rd week of not feeling healthy; I had
a
> cold before we left town, and had it the whole time I was gone) and having
> to adjust back to a 2-hour time change.
>
> All this is why I have been so quiet the past few weeks. I am VERY behind
on
> reading the posts. I hope that someday I will get caught up; I hate to
think
> if what I have missed.
>
> But I will be making a dr. appointment tomorrow to get treated for this
> thing, and I plan to be 100% healthy for Chicago, and rearing to go get
> inspired and energized for the rest of the school year.
>
> I hope to see you there!
> Amy 2 (the one who joined late in 2005)
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Home Stretch
> From: "Amy Broady" <AmyBroady@alumni.duke.edu>
> Date: Fri, 3 Mar 2006 00:47:55 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 21
>
> Stacey, I'm relieved for you that you are about to take all you have been
> able to learn from this challenging group and start with a fresh group,
and
> that you still have your resilient, progress-seeking attitude. And I was
> thrilled to hear that your Frida project went over well. Congratulations!
>
> You asked for ideas Bearden...I can't really be too specific, as I have
not
> taught him yet, but might I suggest using his connection to music as a
> focus? Your project would not have to be a collage. Just an immediate
> thought I had upon reading your post. I am sure you will get many more
great
> responses from our internet colleagues here.
>
> Best wishes for the home stretch!
> Amy2
>
>
>
>
>
> ---
>
> END OF DIGEST
>
> ---
kcarbutt@fox.mpfs.org
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