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reflective thinking in art

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From: Patricia Knott (pknott_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Fri Mar 18 2005 - 14:10:27 PST


Stacy says;
> My principle asked me the other day if I would give a talk on
> reflective thinking at our next staff meeting.

Instead of a "talk" get some of your best students to simulate a
critique. Show them how we train kids to articulate the why how and
what of their decisions and choices in art making and how we give them
the language to do that.
I have been to too many workshops and grad classes where it is all
'talk." There is nothing more powerful than seeing it in action. I'll
never forget, in one of my first years of teaching, being observed
during a critique. The administrator wrote... "Wow, I've never seen
such a thing."
If you ask your students to write artist statements, bring some of
those.

You can talk until doomsday about the research and what others say. I
think art advocacy gets bogged in the words of "what we do." Show
them what we do. What could be more effective than having a bunch of
kids go before a group of teachers and talk about their own art or
someone else's. The other teachers will be amazed at how they can
critically think.

Or do a token/response activity with the teachers. Chose a work of art.
have the teachers respond to it then tell them how our kids do it
better than they. Show them how we go through the process of
description, interpretation and evaluation. Put it on them to see how
much we use critical thinking.

I recently was part of a team that gave a workshop to administrators
and supervisors on using Paideia Seminar technique in the classroom. I
use the Paideia in my art and photo classes for critical thinking and
aesthetic issues. This workshop was a big success because we asked the
administrators to participate in a seminar process. I got so many notes
of thanks. Thanks that they actually got to do something and not sit
through yet another PP presentation.

Stacy. You have been given a best opportunity for advocacy. Make your
presentation words from kids and not some research quotes that are only
words.

Patty

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