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Marcia, "choices" techniques

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From: Sara (sarawren_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Tue Mar 30 2004 - 20:41:18 PST


Marcia

Please share 5 or more "choices" techniques that work for you.

Sara

An excellent book about getting kids to do what you want is "Setting Limits in the Classroom." After using these "choices" techniques, I've had very few problems getting kids to do their work. Marcia

  ----- Original Message -----
  From: marcia lavery
  To: ArtsEdNet Talk
  Sent: Tuesday, March 30, 2004 6:56 PM
  Subject: Re: Alternate project as a consequence for misbehavior

  I tell them on the first day that every day past the due date is 5 points off the grade. (other teachers only give 1/2 credit, so mine is very generous.. I figure some people take longer to finish art projects). I teach middle school also. After two missing assignments in a class, students at our school receive a "minor" which is part of a documented procedure including a call home to the parents. After two "minors" total in any class they will recieve a "major" which is a call from the dean and an assigned detention. In addition, they will lose "privaleges", like going to assemblies, field trips and sports/clubs for one week. Even if we didn't have this system, I would still just give them an "F" if not turned in, and they can get a lower grade. Any kid with a grade lower than a "D" average in art class I would call home to the parents. If they refuse to do any work in class, I've sent kids to the principal's office. They H! AVE to cooperate. They have to do the work. They don't have a choice to not do the work. If the student is not doing work, I will isolate them, have them work at a table or in the hall by themselves for a while, and earn their way back to working at a table with other kids. Phrase it like a choice though: "This sculpture unit is required. You have a choice. You can work on it where you're sitting, or you may work on it over there by yourself. Which would you like to choose?" Sometimes I choose for them. A few times I've offered alternate assignments to kids who are refusing to do the work. (for ex: "I can see you really don't want to do this sculpture project. Another way to learn about sculpture is to read about it. You may do a research project instead.") I've only had one student actually take me up on the offer (and she did a nice poster about Picasso). Most! students would much rather do the artmaking activity. Now I would only allow that once in the quarter.. the art processes are important too! An excellent book about getting kids to do what you want is "Setting Limits in the Classroom." After using these "choices" techniques, I've had very few problems getting kids to do their work. Marcia

  Smjahnle@aol.com wrote:
    What is it with 8th graders this week? An artist investigation project is due Thursday (this was assigned several weeks ago) and I know several students will not have completed the project by the due date. Like Karen, I am also looking for suggestions for this (possible) misbehavior! Sandy J ---

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